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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    12,908

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Crone of Cottonmouth County View Post
    This happened to my sister. She was lounging under a tree at the local wildflower park, enjoying nature's vernal bounty, when suddenly a rough green snake plopped right onto her shoulder. To say that this event sent her completely over the edge would be to vastly understate the case.

    Rough greens are my favorites, though. Brilliant color, and despite having neither hands nor feet they are exquisite tree climbers.
    OH MY GOD~ I just was reading this and I wanted to run screaming!
    Someone would have found me sitting in a corner in a room whimpering.
    Aggghh~
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." Caffeinated.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Crone of Cottonmouth County View Post
    Just a side-note: I don't know where 2Dogs is posting from, but in the US there are no adders of any kind, puff or otherwise. Hog-nose snakes can flatten their "necks" to assume a cobra-like strike-pose, and some will actually hiss, but all species are non-venomous, and they are essentially wussies. They do roll onto their backs and play dead when you mess with'em. They eat only toads. I love those things!
    That is what I thought too, hence the link I posted.
    I have a lovely picture of a very large one who did his best a few years ago to really impress with his leaking tire imitation and look at me, I'm a cobra, I am not afraid of them at all on the ground. Luckily they do not climb trees.
    Still have the willies from even thinking about a snake dropping on me.
    The only bad thing about Eastern hognose, is they eat one of my favorite critters. Toads. Toads keep my snail population in the flower beds down,
    I told Mr. Hognose I would appreciate it if he would go after the Voles but I fear my Toad population has suffered and my hognose has risen due to all the babies I found last fall. If I can get the link to the pic to work I will post it.
    Okay let's see if this link works..
    http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x...7112LowRez.jpg
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." Caffeinated.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    460

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    I work for a dog trainer that does RAT training here in So. Cal., and have taken my own dog through it. It can be very very effective in protecting both the dog and owners.

    We start with snakes that are common to the area, here in So. Cal. it's Western Diamondback and Southern Pacific. The snakes are banded with tape around the head, then a muzzle is placed on and taped.

    We use multiple stations: actual snakes, shed skins, and recording of rattles.

    The shock collars are placed on the dog, and we use different kinds depending on the nature of the dog. The dog is lead along on a loose leash, and new dogs frequently don't pay attention, and they are zapped. It's not enough shock to hurt the average dog, but we did make a Papillion poop on itself once. Oops!

    The dogs are given plenty of time to see what they are dealing with, and make sense of it. At the end, the trainer keeps the dog on one side of a live snake, the owner on the other side. The dog is called by the owner, and by that point, no dog I've seen goes straight over the snake. They give it a wide birth.

    My concern with milking a snake, then placing it in a box with holes are that the snake could get a fang through a hole and potentially scratch a nose, paw, etc.

    DH and I camp in the desert, so I was very concerned about my hyperactive Lhasa mix pup. Went through the training, then camping a few months after. Pup was walking with me through campsite, and gave a very wide berth to a ground hole, arcing his body all the way around it with a low growl. I have never seen a snake in this campsite, but it didn't matter. My pup said he did!

    Good luck and please post an update!
    When people show you who they truly are, believe them. Maya Angelou



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    5,622

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    Awwww, I love me some hognose! Definitely not a pit viper, ROFL, although they will work very hard to convince you they are a DEADLY COBRA OF DEATH -- while I giggle. They will even strike when I am holding them, but they almost never open their mouth (it's all about scaring the big scary thing into dropping you) and I have to giggle even more watching tiny 6" snake trying to head-butt me to death.

    The rough greens are great too (ok, I can't think of a snake I DON'T like) -- they are quite docile and I can just pick them up out of a tree and they are so chill, like an instant pet.

    There ARE flying snakes, I believe in the Amazon basin; much like a flying squirrel, they flatten out their body and are able to glide from tree to tree. It's pretty awesome to think of an animal with no appendages not only CLIMBING a rainforest tree, but then FLYING to the next one. *biology geek-out*


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Crone of Cottonmouth County View Post
    Just a side-note: I don't know where 2Dogs is posting from, but in the US there are no adders of any kind, puff or otherwise. Hog-nose snakes can flatten their "necks" to assume a cobra-like strike-pose, and some will actually hiss, but all species are non-venomous, and they are essentially wussies. They do roll onto their backs and play dead when you mess with'em. They eat only toads. I love those things!
    Ditto. "2Dogs" needs to educate herself before getting all wonky about the snakes in her area. Good Lord - "a hog-nosed pit viper"??? Sorry dear - no such thing in the U.S. This is the kind of stuff that ends up with people whacking snakes left & right without even knowing if they're venonous or not. WAY too sad.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    Awwww, I love me some hognose! Definitely not a pit viper, ROFL, although they will work very hard to convince you they are a DEADLY COBRA OF DEATH -- while I giggle. They will even strike when I am holding them, but they almost never open their mouth (it's all about scaring the big scary thing into dropping you) and I have to giggle even more watching tiny 6" snake trying to head-butt me to death.

    The rough greens are great too (ok, I can't think of a snake I DON'T like) -- they are quite docile and I can just pick them up out of a tree and they are so chill, like an instant pet.

    There ARE flying snakes, I believe in the Amazon basin; much like a flying squirrel, they flatten out their body and are able to glide from tree to tree. It's pretty awesome to think of an animal with no appendages not only CLIMBING a rainforest tree, but then FLYING to the next one. *biology geek-out*
    I know isn't he cute! LOL
    Notice I named him "Guido" Guido the Toad Killer.
    Yup I am weird! LOL
    I think the babies are so cute.. Look at me big tough snake, gonna get you! LOL
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." Caffeinated.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    5,212

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    I, too, love me some hognose snakes. There's a good sized-one who lives on my farm - I didn't know they eat toads, but that would explain why the one on my farm is fat and happy (when he is not being the Ebil Cobra O Death *snicker*).

    In the western SC/NC mountains where I grew up, though, the older people call hognose snakes "puff adders." I think it might be because the old mountain folk came over from Scotland (way back in the day, like before we were even a colony), and in Scotland, I understand the only venomous snake is an adder. When you live so far from medical attention, I guess the safest thing to assume is that all snakes are venomous. Anyway - I know that adders are not pit vipers, but I think this "calling custom" might explain some of the confusion.
    I never rode a broke horse but then maybe I'm a sorry hand. - Ray Hunt

    Chase the trouble. - Buck Brannaman



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    IIRC, the hognose feeds exclusively on toads. They have rear fangs so that when the toad executes his trademark defense, (puff up and ooze venom slobber from their head -- why other snakes don't eat them) the snake punctures said toad balloon and swallows him down. Luckily for the snake, he has a natural immunity to toad venom and a mild venom of his own (no need to fear, he won't hurt you) so his deflated meal doesn't hop off on him.

    This is also why you should never put frogs and toads in a container together: the toads' secretions will kill the frogs, with their sensitive little absorby skin.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2006
    Location
    Overland, MO
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    1,487

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    If a snake fell out of a tree onto me, even your little rough greens you seem to like, I would be dead. Instantly. Of a heart attack of unprecedented severity. For some perverse reason, snakes seem to think that I am their god, and they appear out of thin air (thin ground???) just to wave to me --- and I freak. I was at Barnes and Noble once when a snake appeared --- ok, so a wildlife group had brought in some birds and a big ball python, I think --- I was about to go into heart failure. But surrounded by little kids, I could just die, so I made myself even TOUCH the evil creature. I survived, barely!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2007
    Location
    Heaven on Earth--Sonoma County, CA
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    1,853

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    Quote Originally Posted by ldaziens; I am a lot more terrified of poisonous spiders - our last place was black widow central, and in Japan, I lived in fear of the Mukade -
    [url
    http://thejapans.wordpress.com/2011/07/02/mukade-the-terrible-japanese-centipede/[/url]

    Seriously freaking creepy, the Mukade!!!
    Well thanks for that. I won't be sleeping tonight, nor will I ever travel to Japan. I would take a million snakes over that thing. Holy crap.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com


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