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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    3,591

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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    ^ Only in California...sigh. That means people will have to spend money to get a liner for their little trash cans and such. Sigh.


    I use brown paper sold for wrapping packages. Cheap and easily accessible at places like Staples.
    I was thinking about recycling, or rather, reducing the other day and about not buying the 13 gallon tall kitchen trash bags. I got this sort of alarmed thought, "OMG what would I do without buying plastic bags?? What would I do?! What would I do?!"

    Then I was laughing to myself, remembering that yes, it is possible to live without plastic bags. It's funny how we get used to something and can't imagine life without it.

    When I was young, there were no plastic bags. There was no plastic. Tupperware was a new amazing thing, and really the only plastic kitchen product available. We fed the leftovers to the dog and flushed any wet garbage down the toilet, like leftover sauces or soft food. The remaining organic stuff was thrown into a compost heap or wrapped in a piece of newspaper and thrown away. Cans, bottles, and jars were rinsed before disposal and all the garbage went directly into the trash can without a liner. Milk bottles were returned to the vendor for recycling. My mom would wash the trash cans weekly. They didn't really get as dirty as you might think, but some people's outdoor trash cans were pretty nasty.

    There wasn't nearly as much garbage because foods didn't come prepared and packaged they way they do now. Of course, there were no disposable diapers, so no stinky poop in the trash. People who lived in the country (probably still do this) would separate paper products for burning.

    After living with plastic products for so many years it is hard to imagine life without them, but it is possible, and really not the hardship one might think. Am I ready to give up my garbage liners and zip-loc baggies? No, but if I had to, it wouldn't have a major impact on my life.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    3,591

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    I have been putting a glob of wet epsom salts directly onto the hoof and also the diaper and then quickly fastening and taping everything. I haven't heard of using a piece of paper. Could someone explain how you do it? Do you cut the paper to a piece larger than the hoof, put poultice on, wrap it up around the hoof and tape it, or do you use a smaller piece with poultice, slap it on and quickly put the diaper over it? Do you use paper only for goopy stuff like ichthamol, or for grainy stuff like wet epsom paste?

    My method could use improvement.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,268

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    buy a roll of unwaxed butcher paper. Most office supply stores have it. Sam's has it also. Comes in white or brown.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,873

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    I have been putting a glob of wet epsom salts directly onto the hoof and also the diaper and then quickly fastening and taping everything. I haven't heard of using a piece of paper. Could someone explain how you do it? Do you cut the paper to a piece larger than the hoof, put poultice on, wrap it up around the hoof and tape it, or do you use a smaller piece with poultice, slap it on and quickly put the diaper over it? Do you use paper only for goopy stuff like ichthamol, or for grainy stuff like wet epsom paste?

    My method could use improvement.
    The paper is for poulticing legs with the clay type poultice you buy premade-- you slather it on and cover it with wet paper and then put a standing wrap over the paper.

    There is no good way to poultice a hoof



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,300

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    I just wanted to add to the posters who recommended blue shop towels-they are the best!!!

    You can buy them in WalMart(often in the auto section), they are perforated and are the perfect size for the average horses legs, are easy to wet and also easy to remove.

    No muss, no fuss!!



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2009
    Posts
    249

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    when i worked at the track we used old race programs to poultice! actually i still do the odd time i actually poulitce



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,846

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    PeteyPie... if you're still looking for an answer: do as you're doing. The diaper approach is the simplest way to handle goo and hooves. Using paper means just another layer between the ground and the medication, really, but it isn't a simpler way to wrap hooves. If I'm understanding your question...

    And loved your post on people who knew how to live unwastefully instead of today's suburbanite who has NO idea about their food, their waste, and are totally unaware of how they are fouling everyone else's nest.

    F'rock: we used to use pages from a race-track booklet when we packed hooves. Can't remember what the booklet was...



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    13,811

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    and flushed any wet garbage down the toilet, like leftover sauces or soft food.
    Septic system probably did not appreciate that at all. And I can guarantee that the waste water treatment plant does not like that. They do not like garbage disposals at all so I can promise they do not like people who use their toilet as trash disposal.


    Sorry, but when I walk my dog I am not going to pick up and carry his piles in a paper bag.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,202

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
    And those using newsprint - be careful with your gray horses - you could end up with the ink bleeding through the poultice
    This was a concern of mine... horse in question has 4 tall socks, and I poultice a lot after long days at horse shows. I wasn't going to ask and instead just try it myself and see if it does leech, so thanks for answering the question for me!

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    It seems like most stores that sell natural foods or organic stuff like Trader Joe's and Sprouts use paper bags. If they have produce that you like, you could try buying some stuff at those stores for the paper bags.
    Unfortunately I'm in Louisiana where "organic" and "natural" are still dirty words. Rumor has it a Whole Foods or something equivalent has just been built somewhere within a 50 mile radius of me, but I have yet to see/visit it. But a good idea. I have forgotten about those places since I moved here.



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