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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    587

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    I think she looks like a nice girl, and if you really like her then go for it! An older horse can really help you gain confidence. I would definitely have the vet go over her thoroughly, she looks like she's a bit stiff and may need a bit of maintenance but that's not the end of the world. I think 10k is a lot, but it depends on the market where you are.

    As for the dressage question, it depends if you're showing recognized or not. Training level at recognized shows puts you up against pros with their big moving 4 and 5 year olds. Stiffness is definitely penalized as it makes it hard for the horse to move correctly. Not as big a deal in little schooling shows. That said, with more fitness, correct training, and any required vet care, she may be fine at lower level dressage as well as jumping



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
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    6,998

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    Quote Originally Posted by teddygirl View Post
    That said, with more fitness, correct training, and any required vet care, she may be fine at lower level dressage as well as jumping

    It's about kindness to the horse.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,247

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    I say if you like her and are comfortable with her, make an offer you can live with. If its meant to be you will be her new owner!! None of us are going to be riding her, so its all about you and what you want!!
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,281

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    Have they accepted your offer of $5000 (pending PPE?)
    I guess I would start there.
    if you feel the horse is perfect for you, then go for it. To me that upside down muscle development would have me think twice (yes, it will be hard to correct especially on an older horse and yes, it is a sign the horse has been ridden incorrectly from a classical development standpoint, and yes the horse might object to a change of outline and become not so nice.)
    But then again if the horse is safe and a confidence builder for you, why not? Do keep in mind that Dressage might be difficult for her and lead to unpleasant experiences for both.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,890

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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    I'm with Bristol Bay on this one - there is no way that mare is going 1st Level ... Training Level sure, & you can ride her through the "steps" of a 1st Level test but she'll still be a TL horse.
    She could certainly improve with correct training/riding & likely would appear less stiff with appropriate vet support.

    My comments were generalized, not regarding this specific mare, as BB's comments were also generalized.

    After seeing the video do I think the horse could do low level dressage. Sure. Will she be super successful at it? Depends on the program, the rider, the shows attended...as it does with any horse.

    I still stand by my comment that low level dressage isn't any harder than low level jumping.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2009
    Posts
    605

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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    I still stand by my comment that low level dressage isn't any harder than low level jumping.
    Totally agree. It is quite easy to do either poorly and quite a bit more complicated to do either well.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2011
    Posts
    24

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    In my area this horse would be priced around $2500 to $3000. Some are even going for less than that or free. In my opinion $5000 is too high. I know of a absolutely, lovely packer with a great show record and more rideable and versatile than the horse being talked about where the seller is only asking $2500 and the horse has been for sale for awhile. Horse is also 17. I actually got my current horse for a steal because of his age (15) paid a lot less than $5000 and he has won the Adult Am's twice in his career.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    16

    Default trainer?

    You work for the trainer that owns her? That could complicate things. She's advertising the mare as 14 and able to do Hunters and Equitation with a child. She's asking 10K. When you tell her you know the mare is 17 and, well, you want to buy her and you'll offer her 5 thousand and a good home and keep the mare at the barn and in training and...are you going to need a raise to cover all this? How is this going to look to her?



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,460

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    Super-cute mare with a nice jumping style. Definitely all jumper but does not look like a difficult ride at all. If you can get her for $5k I think you'll be quite happy. She'll probably take a bit of maintenance but what horse her age would not? I bet you could have a lot of fun with this horse.

    Let us know if you figure out her breeding. She looks classy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,369

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    While a good rider can change the way of going of even an older horse I would not expect an average adult rider to do the same without much frustration. I also say, why bother? A packer is a packer and a bit of an underneck wouldn't stop me from buying a horse suitable for packing a beginner adult over fences. There is something about safe over fancy and a safe horse might not win ribbons but they can set the foundation for the next horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2000
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    913

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    Yes, you can insure a 17 year old horse at least for mortality/theft. My agency insures up to 20.

    The age has a impact on the asking price but I would bet the lack of papers wouldn't. She's a little old to breed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2011
    Posts
    86

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    Well I just thought I should share my sad ending to this story.

    I loved this horse, offered 5k, which BO agreed on. I talked my husband into selling his truck to pay for her and told BO that which she was cool with. I was to sign a contract about purchasing her and being responsible for all her fees associated. The BO was at an away show all week so I was just waiting for her to get back. I really thought it was a done deal and she even stated she wouldn't sell her out from under me on a text. I spent all week riding and bonding with the horse so excited for the day she officially would be mine.

    Well yesterday when she is back from a show she tells me someone who tried this horse several weeks ago wants her and will pay the full 10k pending vet exam. I am totally shocked even though I did think it was too good to be true. Money talks, yadda yadda. So now she is going to be sold to these people just because the offer is more. I wish she hasn't even approved my offer in the first place if technically she was still shopping around. I still work for this trainer and can't help but see this going sour. Everyone says there will be more horses, but hearing that makes me really angry. All horses are totally different from one another. I've never come across another horse as sweet and calm as her. I felt so safe on her and walked on some trail rides alone and she didn't react to a single thing. I'm totally heartbroken.



  13. #53
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,812

    Default Thumbs down BO/trainer

    Quote Originally Posted by horsietalk View Post
    Well I just thought I should share my sad ending to this story.

    I loved this horse, offered 5k, which BO agreed on. I talked my husband into selling his truck to pay for her and told BO that which she was cool with. I was to sign a contract about purchasing her and being responsible for all her fees associated. The BO was at an away show all week so I was just waiting for her to get back. I really thought it was a done deal and she even stated she wouldn't sell her out from under me on a text. I spent all week riding and bonding with the horse so excited for the day she officially would be mine.

    Well yesterday when she is back from a show she tells me someone who tried this horse several weeks ago wants her and will pay the full 10k pending vet exam. I am totally shocked even though I did think it was too good to be true. Money talks, yadda yadda. So now she is going to be sold to these people just because the offer is more. I wish she hasn't even approved my offer in the first place if technically she was still shopping around. I still work for this trainer and can't help but see this going sour. Everyone says there will be more horses, but hearing that makes me really angry. All horses are totally different from one another. I've never come across another horse as sweet and calm as her. I felt so safe on her and walked on some trail rides alone and she didn't react to a single thing. I'm totally heartbroken.
    At the risk of soundling like a 5 year old .... boo. While I can understand selling the horse to the highest offer, it stinks that you had your heart set on her. It sounds like the BO was not totally forthcoming or there was a misunderstanding. (sad face)

    My advice - don't raise your offer even if you can. Don't make any "deals". This *may* be a used car tactic "I had someone in today who REEEAAALLLY wants this car." It may be legit, who knows.

    I can see the employment going south only because I am certain you can't help but harbor some bad feelings on a low level.

    I'm sorry. But not to sound like a pollyanna, it may still work out.
    Good luck.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Too old to breed as a maiden wb mare, no? Why breed? There are plenty of young horses on the ground for way cheaper (and maybe nicer) than making your own.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    32,021

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    Actually the fates did you a favor here with something that's not meant to be and , possibly a big yellow blinking light about your relationship with this trainer you work for.

    The oldest sales techniques in the world involve the old "offer limited unless you call in the next hour so don't miss out".

    Wake up and smell the coffee here if you made an offer that seemed to be accepted but another suddenly offered full price pending PPE.

    Let your offer stand but DO NOT offer a penny more or be surprised many hints about full price officer ( hahaha, love auto spell check and guess the word) and continually postponed PPE are dropped.

    And don't confuse your employer with your BFF because your best interests are the farthest thing in the known universe from this trainers mind.

    If s/he was offering you an outstanding opportunity? They would not have taken your offer and suddenly claimed a full price trumped you...with a hint you could up the ante because this Unpapered 17 year old maiden mare is suddenly a hot commodity in this iffy market environment. I call BS on this one.

    This is not a sad thing but a wake up call for you. Leave your offer on the table but look elsewhere for a mentor and friend with your best interests at heart. Trainers never walk on water and this one is sinking fast in the respect department.

    But if there really was a better offer? It's business and how trainers eat. Next time you make an offer? Ask for acceptance within a set time, not let it ride in case something better comes along.
    Last edited by findeight; Apr. 16, 2013 at 09:06 PM. Reason: Correcting phone speak
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2011
    Posts
    96

    Default

    "So now she is going to be sold to these people just because the offer is more."

    Yes, that's how sales work.

    This also serves as a reminder that trainers aren't your friends or extended family. It can seem like it sometimes, but at the end of the day it's a business relationship.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,009

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Just saying, a horse must be more sound to do low level dressage than low jumps.
    Hmm... depends upon the 'issue.' Issue in front feet, maybe = perfectly fine for dressage. I know plenty more jumpers who are 'iffy' soundness wise, so I can understand the notion. But still it TOTALLY depends upon the individual issue.



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2000
    Posts
    1,983

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    A full price offer on an aged horse contingent on a ppe could really go either way.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

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    If these people do not buy her after the ppe I'd think twice before offering 5k again. I'm sure there's a reason they backed out.

    Also I know your pain. Fell in love with this horse. Was going to pay full price though pending ppe. Offered deposit, they said no need no one else looking. Set up ppe for 2 days later. Called day before(next day) just to confirm everything and they wouldn't answer my call all day. Was a little worried about what was going on. I called that evening again from my home phone, because I was home, and she answered. I have a feeling she answered because she hadn't seen my home number yet. Then proceeds to tell me that the student that rode him was really upset and cried to her mom and mom brought them a check so he was sold. I actually cried a bit myself because I really just felt something with this horse. In the end it worked out. I have an amazing and safe horse. Didn't have the training the other did but I've enjoyed our journey together and I couldnt now imagine me not having him. I know it hurts but in the end it's probably the right thing.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2012
    Posts
    1,958

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    Do you mean that you would have to sell the truck first to pay for her?
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!



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