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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,354

    Default Doggie Dentals

    A question for the future, since the vet has OK'd the dogs' teeth for now.

    First option is the taditional cleaning at the vet's office. Blood panels, full sedation.

    Second option is a "Doggie Dentist" who does non-sedation cleaning. Know one dog owner who uses her. Claims seem reasonable - states that it is matenance only, not for dogs with serious dental issues.

    Vet was concerned that groomers or non-vets who clean teeth seem to only scrape them. She felt that without polishing they leave ridges that actually encourage more bacteria and tartar.

    Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    I'd probably go with my vets opinion if I trusted him/her (and if I didn't, I'd be finding a new vet!)....I'm no expert and want to do what is best for my dog, but will be interested to see reactions on here.

    I am going to ask the vet when she goes in for shots in a few weeks, but how often should young dogs receive dental care? My girl is only 3 and had no problems with teeth as of her most recent physical.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    2,609

    Default

    The "Doggie Dentist" is cosmetic only. A friend of mine used them, until her dog (with pearly white teeth) turned up with three abscessed teeth that needed removal by the vet.

    Best thing you can do is brush your dog's teeth daily. You can even teach your dog to accept an electric toothbrush to make the job easier - I kid you not. My vet recommends a child's toothbrush to start and just train slowly, like you do for nail clipping. She has middle-aged Cavaliers that have never needed a full dental.
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,774

    Default

    From what I've read, the non-sedation approach is not really a cleaning but a brushing. Which makes sense to me. When I'm at the dentist for a cleaning, even though a cleaning isn't too intrusive, there are still a few moments where I'm uncomfortable or in pain (very slight, true, but still a bit of ouch). I can't imagine it's possible to do that to a dog safely, considering the location



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    986

    Default

    My Italian greyhound gets his teeth brushed almost daily (he LOVES the toothpaste, so he doesn't mind the brushing at all). That said, I kept missing the same spot or two, so he just had an anesthetized cleaning last week where they could clean under the gumline like they do for people (and what non-anesthesia "dentals" fail to do). The dr also showed me the spots I was missing and tips to help reach those spots when brushing.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    13,991

    Default

    I just cannot get around to cleaning my dogs' teeth - that is just one chore I will not do so I wait for the vet to do a proper job every so often. And I don't think I am a bad Mom!
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2000
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,354

    Default

    Thanks for the input.
    I do "brush" their teeth about once a week. Not sure how effective the brushing part is since they like the doggie toothpaste so much they try to chew on the brush. I just hope the enzymes do their thing. So far they are doing well at nearly 4 years old!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,326

    Default

    It depends if you just want a hand scaling, or a power scaling. NEVER do a power scaling without full anesthetic/intubation with a well inflated cuff. Any debris and water that gets flushed down the trachea can cause aspiration pnemonia and could lead to death.

    I have hand scaled under sedation (basically just cracking the calculus off and brushing) for older dogs, but if the teeth are particularly bad, need a polish or any extractions or you actually need a real dental exam - a full anesthetic with proper monitoring and preventive care is always required. I would never use a vet clinic who did power scaling/polishing under sedation only.



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