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  1. #21
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    Dec. 29, 2006
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    Davie, FL
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    It's so nice to see a positive thread about snakes! Keep us posted as the process continues...looking forward to many and colorful offspring .


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Wow, Lauruffian, VERY interesting! Thank you for the lesson/photos/diagram.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


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  3. #23
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,547

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    Thanks for the education.

    On the pictures: All good with the dark colored baby. The lighter one, snake=worms=fingers has been overdone in horror movies.

    And the internal snake balls. Notice that in the diagram they only have the intestines near them. Not a lot of other organs to generate heat.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  4. #24
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    Oct. 25, 2007
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    3,578

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    In st Germaine's pics, is that a rattlesnake? Scroll past the mating snakes, past the horses and it looks like rattler.

    I cannot believe I am finding this thread interesting. Did think the one baby sake was cute, but the multiple babies ...not so much. Sorry.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



  5. #25
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Must admit, found myself "awwww-ing" at the first "baby snake" pic. Interesting thread. I have always liked snakes. Just don't like being "surprised" by them.

    One of the coolest surgeries I was ever in was to remove a light bulb from a snake. Apparently, Mr. Snake (that was his actual name) thought the spare lightbulb looked like an edible egg. I used to show that radiograph to new clients when giving tours of the clinic. LOL
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


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  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    In st Germaine's pics, is that a rattlesnake? Scroll past the mating snakes, past the horses and it looks like rattler.

    I cannot believe I am finding this thread interesting. Did think the one baby sake was cute, but the multiple babies ...not so much. Sorry.
    Yes - those later pics do look like a rattler, & a large one at that!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
    Location
    Southern California
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    1,974

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    Ooh, now I had to go back and see the pics of St Germain's rattlesnake. COOL! ...in a keep-your-distance kind of way. Looks like a timber rattlesnake, but not sure because I don't know where you live. Are you in its habitat distribution area?

    We have Western diamondbacks out here, among others. Thankfully what we see out here 95% of the time is a gopher snake, a cousin of the corn snake.

    I was visiting a corn snake forum yesterday and learned our male carries two mutation genes--amelanistic/albino and motley. Motley has to do with the pattern--rather than individuals spots (called saddles, heh) his are all connected, and he also doesn't have the checkered belly corn snakes typically have. This is exciting because it means there are at least 4 genetic combinations possible in the clutch: normal, normal-motley, amelanistic, amelanistic-motley...but who knows what else is lurking in their DNA! Cleo came from a breeder who had all sorts of exotic color combinations, so she may have all sorts of other possibilities in her genes.

    To give you an idea of just how many color morphs there are for corn snakes, check out the list on the right side of this page. I don't know what half of those are. Page takes you to a description of my male's amelanistic motley color morph.

    I'm buying an incubator today. Seriously, so excited!

    Every now and then I see this through others' eyes--you COTHers help me, heh--and realize for most folks this is pretty, um, unusual. But not for me!

    Thanks for humoring me and sharing in my excitement!
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie



  8. #28
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post

    One of the coolest surgeries I was ever in was to remove a light bulb from a snake. Apparently, Mr. Snake (that was his actual name) thought the spare lightbulb looked like an edible egg.
    What? Did it stay intact inside him or break? You had a snake with a hollow lightbulb shaped hole in him? That's outta a cartoon!
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  9. #29
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Every animal sex thread I'm a part of has to get back to this question:

    Do the females have a clitoris that is ennervated right for the Big O?

    I ask because

    1) Females have to hold still while the guy gets the job done.

    2) In many species, too, the burden of getting the babies born and raised falls to the female. Yet she still contributes the same 50% of her genes. From an evolutionary standpoint, then, females are getting ripped off.

    3) So what accounts for a female consenting to sex? I'm not asking this from a species view point: Of course that group as a whole needs two consenting partners. But I'm asking how females got built to do their job in reproduction.

    4) When I asked this question about mares-- to a male anatomist and other people-- the answer was I Dunno. People! What kind of card-carrying academic discipline doesn't know if the ladies like it, and doesn't bother to ask?

    So I'm askin' about the Mrs. Snakes.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
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    I am going to NOPE my way right out of this thread.

    Didn't even open any pictures and I have the SUPER heebie jeebies.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2005
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    CO
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    I think snakes are awesome and am loving how much I'm learning on this thread! I won't ever keep them as pets, nor allow my son to, though. Personal taste.

    I'm anxious to see these babies! Lauruffian, this is cool, thanks!

    MVP, I don't know how or why so many female species get the carry/birth/raise stick with no male around, but I remember reading some academic articles some time back that stated pigs, dolphins (perhaps also whales), and a few other species that I'm blanking on right now absolutely enjoy sex and reach orgasm. I should see if I can find them again....
    "IT'S NOT THE MOUNTAIN WE CONQUER, BUT OURSELVES." SIR EDMUND HILLARYMember of the "Someone Special To Me Serves In The Military" Clique



  12. #32
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    3. And where do they keep their balls? Warmblooded animals keep 'em on the outside so as to lessen heat that would denature proteins involved with the semen. Snakes don't have to mess with that? Balls on the outside would certainly be un-aerodynamic (or whatever the word would be if you are sliding across the ground).
    I would guess everything is internal since sliding over gravel and being a well hung snake would be really painful, and probably ruin the mood.


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  13. #33
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    Dec. 20, 2000
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    Snakes are pretty cool but i never got into them because I wouldnt want to feed them mice (even already dead ones.)
    Dont you feel bad though keeping them so confined? Every time I see snakes in the wild, they appear to be pretty active creatures and all of the tames ones are just always curled up in aquariums



  14. #34
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    Mar. 4, 2010
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    In my pics, yes that's a rattler in my front yard, maybe 20' from the house. The dogs were barking and I went out to see what they were raising a ruckus about and the snake was there. I called the dogs in (fortunately, no one was struck, even though they were circled around the snake barking at it). I did call my neighbor to dispatch the snake, although usually I'm pretty much live and let live with the rattlesnakes around here (I'm in Middle Tennessee). I just couldn't risk my dogs' lives. It wasn't a very large snake, about 3' long. I've seen bigger on my property. I once saw one that was at least 5' long and as big around as my upper arm. That one struck one of my dogs on her face. Her whole neck and chest swelled up, but I called my vet and she told me to give the dog some penicillin and steroids and she pulled through.

    The same week as the snake in the front yard I rolled my tractor over on top of myself and had a gas leak in the house. I was doing my best to kill myself that week.

    StG



  15. #35
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    May. 20, 2008
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    I just saw the baby pics and they are so adorable! Nothing cuter than a baby!



  16. #36
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    Oct. 9, 2002
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    Southern California
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    Update! That was due, uh, a month ago.

    Cleo laid a clutch of 14 eggs (13 fertile, 1 infertile) on May 27, 2013. This is 59 days from first confirmed breeding...ugh. Waiting took forEVER. And now, we wait AGAIN. Since I've got them incubating at 82 degrees, it should take about 55 days or so--the week of July 22. This makes today (27 days) roughly the halfway point...whee.

    Pics: Cleo with her freshly-laid clutch

    13 fertile, one obviously infertile, eggs. They do naturally stick together like that--although infertile eggs, in addition to being smaller and yellower, also don't adhere well to the rest of the clutch. Makes sense, as it would rot away and this could harm the nearest good eggs. I tossed it after this photo was taken.

    I placed the clutch in a a tupperware full of HatchRite, a specialized-for-this-purpose substrate, put a few tiny holes in the tupperware, put the lid on...

    ...Put them in the incubator, then left them be. I take them out about once a week to check they aren't wrinkling or denting (signs of drying out), getting moldy, rotting, etc. So far, so great.

    I'll update with pics once the babies start "pipping"--poking through the eggshell with their egg tooth and peeking out, but not exiting yet. Here's a nice shot of pipping babies--sadly not mine. Yet.

    I've learned the female can retain semen and self-fertilize a new clutch on her own; typically, she lays when the first clutch is hatching. It's not always favored as it is pretty stressful on the female. I'll be keeping an eye on her to see if she's up to more baby-making.

    So excited! If bored by all the waiting...
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie



  17. #37
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Thanks for the update & the wonderful pics!!

    While I've had Bahama Anoles lay eggs that hatched out in a warm, well-planted terrarium, no snakes. I did, however, once have a Red-bellied Snake give birth to live young.

    Please do keep us updated!



  18. #38
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    What? Did it stay intact inside him or break? You had a snake with a hollow lightbulb shaped hole in him? That's outta a cartoon!
    I'm sorry that I missed this so long ago.

    The bulb did no break because like an egg, with equal-ish pressure from all sides, that shape is actually pretty strong.

    I used to show prospective clients that radiograph when I gave tours of our hospital. LOL I loved that rad.

    Mr. Snake ate a lot of other weird stuff too. AND he got attacked by some rats and we had to suture him up. His owners were away and a friend was caring for him. Instead of pinkies, they bought full grown critters who attacked Mr. Snake and did quite a bit of damage. But we got him healed up.

    I have no idea what happened to the snake, but I "knew" him for nearly 10 years.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  19. #39
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    I understand that that's the reason (besides parasites) that captive snakes shouldn't be fed live rodents. Many times the "prey" becomes the predator. Unless absolutely necessary with a rare species that wouldn't eat otherwise, even zoos don't feed live prey to reptiles.



  20. #40
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    Jun. 15, 2010
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    Maybe this is a silly question but what are you going to do with the babies? I'm a little wigged out by them so I guess I don't think about other people actively seeking them out. Are there forums and sale sites or is it more through word of mouth? Are you keeping any?



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