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  1. #41
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    Sep. 23, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrudoc View Post
    I...can't. While I can donate money, etc., this big, tough, assertive, dominant female gets all cry baby in animal shelters. I can't even look at the sweet and scared little cat and dog faces
    I get this, and I agree that it sounds like you don't have time for a dog right now. If you want to spend quality time with some dogs, consider volunteering with a local no kill shelter or rescue. Many need folks to help socialize and walk their dogs, and you don't have to worry about dogs that are going to be euthanized, if that bothers you



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    for the OP- what about an ex-racer greyhound? they are in need of homes, they are used to sitting in kennels most of the time so a laundry room + fenced yard would be absolute heaven, and they really don't need all that much in the way of exercise or attention. A quiet leash-walk every day, plus the occasional full-out gallop in a safe fenced area, and they are really low-maintenance, lovely pets.
    I will chime in and say I have known two greyhounds that were adopted after they were done with their racing careers, and they were both great pets. Perfect on the leash, friendly, very mannerly, good with kids. One of the dogs was not good around cats, but I don't know if that was common for the breed, or if it was just that one dog.

    Soloudinhere- Sorry you got stuck with a less than ideal dog/situation. My parents had their own small animal vet practice for almost 50 years, and one of their classic observations was: "There are plenty of nice animals that need homes. There is no reason to have one that's not nice." It stinks that yours sounds not nice.

    And I'm looking at my own very sweet, low maintenance dog, and thinking how good he is. Not that he's flawless, but then, neither am I.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2003
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    Brentwood, NH
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    1,049

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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    for the OP- what about an ex-racer greyhound? they are in need of homes, they are used to sitting in kennels most of the time so a laundry room + fenced yard would be absolute heaven, and they really don't need all that much in the way of exercise or attention. A quiet leash-walk every day, plus the occasional full-out gallop in a safe fenced area, and they are really low-maintenance, lovely pets.
    Yes, yes, yes. We are now on our 4th greyhound, an absolutely adorable 10 year old female who was part of a group of 15 rescued greys. They were in a rescue kennel in Maryland, the owner took sick and was hospitalized, and the kennel help abandoned the hounds. They were not fed or attended to for 2 weeks. We had been thinking of adopting another grey to keep ours company, and we heard about these rescued hounds. Greyhounds are lazy, quiet, calm, non-clingy, lovable, short haired and non-demanding. Ours do take a run in their fenced yard once or twice a day, but otherwise are just sleeping most of the time. If they could, they'd sleep on the couch, but we are "no dogs on the furniture" people, and they have soft beds on the floor. The new hound, Melody, is still learning about not begging for food, but she's a quick study. We've had other breeds (a beagle samoyed cross - terrible idea, a retired foxhound - also a fabulous hound, and a treeing walker coonhound - really bad idea) but we just keep going back to the greyhounds. There are online dog personality tests you can take to determine the best breed for your lifestyle, and we did one of those 17 years ago before we got our first grey. Greyhounds were the perfect match for us on the test. I think getting a dog based on its looks is a terrible way to pick one, and know so many people who are unhappy with their dogs that they got because it was "so cute." Like my parents who had 4, count em, 4 Shelties who were all neurotic, barking, biting little fiends.



  4. #44
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    Sep. 19, 2003
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    Brentwood, NH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Some people want a companion out of owning a dog, not one more intense job.
    You have to get the right kind of dog for what you want.



  5. #45
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    Sep. 19, 2003
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    Brentwood, NH
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    Quote Originally Posted by soloudinhere View Post

    Would have been faster if himself would just run and not have to pick up every stick, smell everything, and bark at everything that was there last week. He acted dead tired when I got home-- for about half an hour, until he got his power nap. He promptly decided the appropriate thing to do was shred his dog bed. Then got dog ADD, chewed up 3 different toys in the span of 15 minutes while I was in the shower.

    This is a dog that doesn't just lie down and hang out. Even when tired he will be actively looking for trouble to get into. I'm sure since your dogs are perfect, you wouldn't know anything about that

    Yes, I did expect a COMPANION-- a dog who will sit when we sit, and play when we play, not constantly wander around the house getting into stuff (I own 14 baby gates. FOURTEEN. Because he will go anywhere he is not blocked from, and find something to eat/destroy) and whining and crying when prevented from getting into trouble.

    I should add before people jump all over me again-- I did NOT want this breed, mix, or variety of dog. Husband insisted we had to have a "big" dog because that's what he wanted. I actually desperately wanted a Corgi puppy, not a 1 year old pit mix with issues. I failed to bond with this dog because the first week we had him, he attacked me with intent to injure me twice. I wanted him to go back but husband refused because they would put him down, which frankly I think he deserved wholly. So yeah, I guess maybe I do hate this dog, because I don't trust him as far as I can throw him and I don't think he has deserved the kind of attention and care we have given him which has only resulted in him becoming needier and having an even less attractive personality.
    Do you have a crate? I'd crate him. Seriously. But it does sound like this is totally not the dog for you. We made a serious mistake in the last dog we got before our most recent greyhound. Trixie was on craigslist for free (there's a clue!) One year old treeing walker coonhound. Looks like a big beagle. Went to visit her, the owner says she barks at traffic and is impossible to catch if she gets loose. We have a fenced dog run, and we're not in a city, so we thought we'd be okay. Brought her home, just me and the kids. Husband arrives home and Trixie attacks him. Jumped on him, barking and growling, scared him to death. (Second clue!) We wrote it off as new dog stress. Trixie chewed everything she could get hold of. Everything. All her cute dog toys had the faces chewed off and the sqeakers disabled. Seriously, she chewed the faces off! She escaped in the first week, just slithered out of her collar while I was putting her in the dog yard. Could not catch her. She would run circles around me, as if she was hunting, but would not be caught. I finally went home and left the door open and she came home and ran in the house. We had to crate her every time someone visited, and she would be in that crate sounding like she was going to kill somebody, barking and growling and flinging herself around. Every time we put her outside she'd bark continuously, to the point where our neighbors complained. We had to get an electronic anti bark collar. We put up with this for 4 years, until the day I had someone here to look at a horse. She asked to use the bathroom, and went in ahead of me, I didn't even think to check if Trixie was loose. Trixie attacked her, bit her, broke the skin. And to top it off, this woman was a lawyer. We had to put Trixie down. In hindsight, she probably should have been put down a long time ago. I have no idea if Trixie would have worked for anyone, but she sure didn't work for us. I don't want a dog to make my life harder!

    If your husband's dog has already attacked you, there is a good possibility that he will attack someone else. And that could end badly for more than just the dog. In our case, we were lucky not to get sued, and lucky the lawyer didn't get more seriously injured by our dangerous dog.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,372

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    OP-I FINALLY got to pick out my own dog--10 years ago this summer. Prior to that, our family dogs were mostly my brothers' or mom's and they usually were dogs that had been dumped out in the country near our home. Then I was in school, living in apartments, etc and couldn't have one. As SOON as I could, I did. I was working from home (perfect for a pup!), had a nice big yard, etc. Ideal.

    Well, then I had to move, and move and move, and move again....if you're willing to make it work, it can work.

    For me in my first move to a place with no yard and long hours at a new job, it required a neighbor kid who I paid to walk midday.

    Then I had a yard again but my dog needed to get out more frequently--doggy door. I think your laundry room + a nice soft bed + a doggy door would work out well.

    We got to keep the doggy door at my DH's house, just had to put in another fence.

    Now that we're in a townhome with no yard, I spend a LOT of time walking my two big dogs. If I couldn't do it, I would defnitely hire someone as the dog door isn't an option here.

    My typical day goes like this:

    5am: Take dog A out for quick pee. Feed dogs, drink coffee.
    5:20am: Take dogs out for a quick poop.
    5:30: get in shower, get dressed, suck down more coffee.
    6:00: Take dogs out for a brisk 30-45 min walk.
    6:45: hit the road for the office.

    Then when I get home around 3:30, they get the quick out to pee, I change and then we typically do another hour + walk. Dinner at 6, walk, another walk before bed.

    I think that in your situation it would be doable if you can have someone check in on your super long days in the afternoon. Neighbor kid perhaps?
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2012
    Location
    Zone 1
    Posts
    10

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    OP-My schedule seems to be kind of like yours. School, work, braiding, rinse and repeat.

    Before I "rescued" my dog, I literally had zero intention of owning a dog. None. I didn't think my lifestyle would fit one in, and I really had never thought about it. While I don't work there anymore, my job at the time was... (and don't judge)... as a manager of a local pet store chain that thankfully went bankrupt a few years ago. As the manager, I saw many dogs come in and leave day after day, and I saw the ones that were A-holes (not by their own fault obviously) and never. got. adopted.

    There was this one little Jack Russell Terrorist, and she was approaching six months when our fateful union occurred. Like the poster who is being assaulted by her dog, I really really wanted an adorable Corgi, sweet, fat and laid back, with the same kind of sleeping (read: hibernation) patterns that I have. However, this dog had kind of caught my eye, being a horsey twenty-something year old, and growing up seeing herds upon herds of these little rat-killers scampering around at shows in New England, I had kind of taken to her, giving her extra treats and feeling badly that she was among the last to be adopted. We received puppies at six weeks from our corporate headquarters, and usually these puppies were out the door with their new families by eight weeks. This little puppy had stealthily crept into my heart, watching me through the glass of her little cage, and not biting me nearly as hard as she bit the other girls that worked there.

    Then one day, a decidedly urban family came in, with six kids who were running around and slamming on the glass, right next to the signs that practically begged the customers not to. The parents sauntered up to the counter where I was pretending to be super busy (lurking on COTH actually, long before I ever opened my own account) and informed me that they would like to purchase the cheapest puppy in the store. Knowing that the least expensive puppy was the JRT by far, at $400, she was about $600 less than the other puppies in there, I made a split second decision and blurted out, "Well the Jack Russell was listed at $400, but she literally just sold ten minutes ago. I'm making her 'Sold' sign as we speak." They left puppyless after haggling with me over the $1400 pricetag of a Cavalier King Charles for ten minutes while I repeated my "prices are non-negotiable" line ad nausuem.

    Knowing that my district manager would at the very least put me on puppy poo patrol if he found out that I had passed up an opportunity to get this nightmare of a puppy out of the store, I ended up swiping my own credit card and selling the dog to myself when the store was (blissfully) empty about a half hour later.

    I took her home that night and looked around my mother's house with the nice furnishings and painstakingly chosen carpeting as this little jack sat on the kitchen floor and looked back up at me, and I thought, "Oh my LORD what have I done. It's not like I can return her, that would just be admitting defeat."

    I had a full school schedule, was teaching on the side, braiding for two big barns, had my own three horses to work with, AND was working about 45 hours as a manager at the store. Not exactly an environment conducive to a new puppy, even one that was six months young. However, everything managed to work out, the store ended up closing soon after that and I started teaching and training full time, so I was able to take her to work with me most of the time.

    This dog has repaid me the $400 I spent on her a hundred-fold. I think she had an idea that she would not have worked out with the family that came in, as she had taken to biting children when they took her into the "puppy play room" at the store, and would in all likliehood have been given up and euthanized at a shelter soon after, cold, alone and unloved. (This biting issue has thankfully not ever come up after she left the store.) She's been easy to train, potty and otherwise, and has this absolute couch nesting, cuddling, people loving and happy demeanor that I haven't seen in any other jack that had the "childhood" she had.

    If you do make the decision to get a dog, either now, or down the road, a shelter dog (which is basically what mine was at that point) will most likely be housebroken, and will be very appreciative of their new lifestyle, so any resentment at spending six to eight hours alone will be completely overpowered by the feelings of love and happiness they have when you get home from work. Mine has sort of the same living situation yours would have, I moved out of my mothers and into a small apartment complete with a doggie door out the back that opens into a safely fenced yard on the end of a quiet street. While I'm at class or teaching in the rain she generally is snoozing at home, or humping the Siamese cat that she has decided is her boyfriend... oh and she's fixed. Explain that one... (Oh and I have proof... my old roomate decided to break in after she moved out and for a few weeks we had cameras in the house as the JRT was no use, she saw the roommate as a great old pal that may have cookies..) When I'm home and we finish our stroll to the beach and back, she sits in front of my laptop while I'm doing schoolwork. She's actually checking this out as I'm typing right now, hopefully checking for spelling errors, the little smarty pants. She's got a whole bagful of tricks that weren't really consciously taught, such as high five and give kisses, to the delight of everyone that meets her.

    When I'm taking kids to shows or braiding, she's right there with me, snoozing in her puppy paddock or keeping an eye on the night watchman as he makes his rounds. I know this is long, but I guess my major point is that it can work with your schedule. I don't think I would even go braid now if she wasn't going to come with me. The showgrounds can get pretty lonely at two in the morning, and not only is she my company, along with the horses, but I do think she would try her best to keep me as safe as she could if the situation ever arose.

    Sorry that this turned into a trip down memory lane/brag about my little dog, but I just want you to know the right one is out there and waiting for you and just may fall into your lap, literally, when you least expect it.

    Good luck!



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    AWW!! I am so happy you gave that little dog such a good home!

    I have decided against it though, for now. I just moved and feel like if one. more. thing. gets added to my plate I may burst LOL!!
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    709

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    Quote Originally Posted by HandyHunter View Post
    or humping the Siamese cat that she has decided is her boyfriend... oh and she's fixed. Explain that one... (Oh and I have proof... my old roomate decided to break in after she moved out and for a few weeks we had cameras in the house as the JRT was no use, she saw the roommate as a great old pal that may have cookies..) !
    It's about dominance.

    Glad the OP decided against a dog... didn't sound like the right choice at this stage in her life.

    Love my dog. She drives me up a wall nearly daily. If I didn't love her so much...



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