The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 49
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    9,281

    Default So getting a dog? Really??

    For some reason I have been mulling over getting a dog. A nice, full grown dog. I adore pugs but really have no preference, a mutt, whatever, just house broke please.

    But! Here is the issue. I work full time, I also braid at shows all summer, I go to school full time. Granted, it's mostly online but this summer and next I will have class Tues and Thurs night until 7 or 8 pm.

    I also have two cats. Tux will most likely like any smaller dog right away and within a few days accept a bigger dog. Edo will lose his mind, freak out, and hide for a week or three. So, there is company for a pup but I don't feel right kenneling a dog all day while I am at work I leave at 6:30 and get home around 5:30, that is 11 long hours! No pet doors, the cats cannot go outside.

    *sigh*
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    761

    Default

    Pugs are veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery needy. I have one and he is like having a baby! Don't get a dog if you can't give it the time an attention it deserves, please.
    "Your best can be worn at any length"- Jason Mraz


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    15,082

    Default

    Is there any way to close off part of the house so you could have a dog door that the cats can't get to when you're not home?

    Honestly, once I put in a dog door to a fenced yard, I kicked myself for not doing it years earlier. So much better in every way!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    9,281

    Default

    Yes but it would involve locking the dog in the laundry room for the whole day

    I really don't think I could do it with my time being so limited. Just not fair to a pup, KWIM?
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,491

    Default

    Do you really want a dog, or just like the IDEA of having a dog to scritch.

    Sounds like your life right now would not easily accommodate a dog, would not be kind to one to be a house ornament most of the time.

    You do have two cats, you say?
    That should be a good complement for now for some cuddlers and handy that they can take it or leave it, unlike a dog would be.

    Could you not enjoy other's dogs for a bit here and there?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,332

    Default

    You could also investigate doggy daycare or a dog walking service. It isn't undoable with a dog that is older and doesn't have puppy demands.
    Just be careful w/breed choice. I would not choose a pug in your situation.
    Sorry to see xtranormal is gone
    For funnies, search youtube for horseyninjawarrior!

    Www.caringbridge.org/visit/mysecretgarden


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2009
    Posts
    179

    Default

    So, the dog would be in the laundry room, with access to the yard from a dog door?
    That's no problem.

    There are dog-walking services (if you live in any populated area) There are puppy daycares. Dogs can go to barns if they're well behaved.

    My take on it is this; I've worked in shelters, where dogs are kenneled unless the kennel is being cleaned, or maybe they get to run for an hour ... and then they get put down after x# of days. Can you give a dog better then that? Then go get one from a kill shelter.

    And keep in mind - I have 6 dogs. Every last one is currently sleeping. They do that a lot. The time they get outside, I make sure they run and play and mentally stimulate them and wear them out - then they crash. They lounge and doze and play with chew toys a good 18 hours a day.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    15,082

    Default

    Riverotter- ouch! On the dogs in shelters.

    I agree, laundry room with a dog door and a bed inside- no problem.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,554

    Default

    I don't know if it's a pug specific thing or my sister in law has bad luck, but both pugs she's had have tons of ear nose problems, and severe food allergies. She spent tens of thousands treating her last pug. Her current one is a total pain in the ass too.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,471

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MHM View Post
    Riverotter- ouch! On the dogs in shelters.

    I agree, laundry room with a dog door and a bed inside- no problem.
    For the right dog. I know many dogs that would be very content with this set up and others that would spend all day with their face pressed against the door waiting for their person to come home. A laidback but independent type might enjoy that set up with a daily afternoon walk from a dog sitter.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,366

    Default

    I don't think your schedule sounds fair to a dog, personally.
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    9 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2007
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    4,498

    Default

    I just got a dog at the beginning of the year. She's awesome. I have a very busy schedule, too, but I make it work. She goes out in the morning before I leave for work, I come home at lunchtime to take her out again, and we got for a long walk in the evening when I get home.

    Get in touch with a local shelter and see if you can foster first. That's what I did. It gave me 3 weeks to see 1) if I could handle the schedule, 2) if the dog could handle the schedule, and 3) if the cat would adapt - but beyond the initial 3 weeks, there was zero commitment.
    People call themselves animal lovers, then let their dogs chase the squirrels. You're scaring the shit out of the squirrels, you schmuck!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    9,281

    Default

    Well, I thought about that but although I will be living about 20 mins from work, I cannot guarantee I can always come home for lunch. Heck, I haven't even been able to take lunch yet this week!

    I think PocketPony is right, my schedule is too tight right now. But, it's on my mind and circumstances do change. I will continue to mull it over I am one of those that will think about it for months anyway so there is no rush.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    ...right where I want to be
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    If you're craving some puppy love then try volunteering at your local shelter. Play with all the dogs you want and maybe, when you're ready, the right dog will come along.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    9,281

    Default

    I...can't. While I can donate money, etc., this big, tough, assertive, dominant female gets all cry baby in animal shelters. I can't even look at the sweet and scared little cat and dog faces
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    ...right where I want to be
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    In the beginning it's hard, but when you see the animals adopted to wonderful homes it's all worth it. Just try to resist that initial urge to take them all home and you'll be fine. My coworkers and I all joke that we're potential hoarders. Even on the bad days I can't imagine working anywhere else.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    9,281

    Default

    No, I start crying. Like a baby. Like BAWLING. It does not go well. And I don;t get over it. But I appreciate where you are coming from
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverotter View Post
    My take on it is this; I've worked in shelters, where dogs are kenneled unless the kennel is being cleaned, or maybe they get to run for an hour ... and then they get put down after x# of days. Can you give a dog better then that? Then go get one from a kill shelter.
    I so agree with this! There are always going to be dogs that need nearly constant exercise and attention. However, I would say that the majority of the dogs at shelters would prefer to be alone for 11 hours a day and then have someone come home to love them, to being in a shelter.

    twotrudoc, what about getting an older dog, maybe even elderly? That way you wouldn't feel bad about them not getting the exercise they need. A lot of the older dogs are very happy just sleeping most of the day.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2008
    Posts
    642

    Default

    I adore my Pug. I rescued her from a breeder because she had an eye problem. (She's fine now.) But she is on me ALL the time. Honestly, I can't tell you the last time I went to the bathroom alone. Or showered without her peeking in. (She's also in training to be my service dog, so for me it is a good trait.) Heck, even when I have a horrible bout of pancreatitis and can't keep anything down (I know, TMI) she is in the bathroom sitting next to me the whole time. She even screams and barks when she feels that I'm "too ill" or whatever she perceives as my limit to alert my husband. She sleeps in the bed, she goes to the store, a Pug always wants to be near her person. And there is no just sitting next to you on the sofa. They have to sit ON you.

    Pugs do have lots of health issues, but they are pretty manageable. Sadly lots of them end up in shelters and rescues because people don't want to take care of them.

    My cat tolerates the Pug, and my Pug thinks they cat might kill her. (Which, she does attack her at times, but I've also seen them play.) They are chasers, but as long as the cat can get up high it is okay.

    I have nothing but wonderful things to say about Pugs. There are many who need loving homes!
    Hope Blooming- Life with Chronic Pancreatitis

    My blog: Life with Pancreatitis


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,526

    Default

    Definitely investigate the doggy daycare in your area. Here, there is a doggy daycare that has an old school-bus and they drive around in the morning and pick all the dogs up and then drop them off in the evening. I've never seen it, but apparently all the dogs are SO excited and run out to the school bus and then sit there looking out the windows all smiling and happy.

    But otherwise the older dog might be a good fit, too. I've taken in a few older dogs straight off the street and they've been just lovely little souls--great company and definitely don't need as much in the way of walks/play (but they do need some love and company!). It would be a wonderful thing to take an older dog from the shelter and give it a good home; they always have a harder time finding someone to take them and often get put to sleep. A quiet home with a bed and a doggy door and some cat-friends might be heaven to one of them.
    Last edited by Frizzle; Apr. 5, 2013 at 08:36 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness