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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
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    2,513

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    My horses are rarely stalled but when they are I go out before I go to bed around midnight and pick stalls. It's done again in the morning while they eat, first thing.

    Normally my 2 fat horses are kept on a 250 x 250 dry lot with a run in,
    We go out in the morning with the little tractor and cart and pick the lot and run in.
    I pick the run in each time I go out to feed or whatever and then the whole lot is picked again early evening before dark.
    I check and pick if needed the run in one more time before I go to bed.

    I 'ain't" going to have one of my horses standing in poop,
    No horse should have to.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    9,991

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    They do it all of the time. Some horses are neat in their stalls, but others are total pigs, and poop all over. If they poop next to their feed bucket, they will be searching for crumbs on/around that pile the next meal. Same with when they poop where they have spread their hay for the night.
    I haven't seen what you're describing, and I've been around horses a long time. Says something about your horsekeeping skills then. I'm not going to keep arguing with you. I think many of your ideas are crazy anyway.

    This thread has possibly given FHC a new idea for how to manage the stalls in her barn!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    14,445

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    I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488

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    grayarabpony, you are always entertaining The fact that you have not seen a horse that is a pig in their stall says a lot about your level of experience.

    I guess you have not seen horses either that tend to like to poop IN their feed or water buckets. I shifted one horses water buckets into each corner of his stall to find a place he would stop doing that. Thankfully, he gave it up after about 6 months of driving me crazy.

    I still remember also when one of my self care boarders met me in the morning and asked me if I knew what a full house was. She was very mad at her horse who managed to fill not only both of his water buckets that night, but his feed bucket too.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
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    14,488

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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    Yes.



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,366

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    I guess you guys have never been at a barn with a manure spreader that spreads manure on the fields?
    If I were I wouldn't be there long.

    My sympathies to the OP. Do you get gnats in AZ? If not it's a shame. A barn swarming with clouds of gnats is very educational.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
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    7,538

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    Quote Originally Posted by ldaziens View Post
    I am also confused about paying for a manure dumpster. We compost ours. I guess it makes sense if one had a lot of horses on a very small property - or something. That could be a profitable business - charging to pick up the manure, then composting it and selling the compost - making money from the suppliers and the consumers.

    And, I, like others am really confused about the "smashing", which would take more time & effort than just picking it up.
    there are a lot of places where you can not compost that must manure.. the manure must be carted away.



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,429

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    That's what I'm thinking.

    Harrowing fields and spreading manure on fields is 100% normal and customary practice in this region. And no, we're not making Mother Nature cry because we are destroying the earth.

    We are adding nutrients back to the soil that were removed by grazing or haying. You soil test and add lime/fertilizer as necessary depending on what the land is being used for.

    I guess everyone could pay out the nose to have it all removed, so a company or gov't entity can compost it and sell it (keeping the money of course). Then the owner could incur additional expense by purchasing more fertilizer for their now depleted hayfields and pastures, which fertilizer will run off when it rains.

    What is telling to me is not how fancy a place is or how obsessed the owner is with their animal's poo. I look at the condition of the animals. If they are in good health, alert, and in good condition - that's all that matters.





    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    She your SIL? Talk to your brother if your suggestions fall on deaf ears. Explain in vivid detail what life would be like if she continues to do this.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
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    14,671

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    Smashed poo in a very dry climate will tend to become powder/dust. That means it gets everywhere; water buckets, feed, hay, coat, lungs etc.etc..
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

    We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.

    Our horses are kept in stalls with runs. We use shavings in the winter and swept stall mats the rest of the year. Our horses all sleep in their sandy paddocks and all but one poops in their stall primarily. The paddocks and stalls are picked at least once per day. We even strip our chicken coop regularly and replace the shavings (it has an above ground floor).
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
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    401

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    We do pretty much exactly what microbovine is doing: fly predators really help in the summer to keep the flies down to a dull roar. We compost our shavings/manure mix and spread it on the fields. We have a poop stomper(walker) who could justify a complete stall strip daily. We sometimes will poop pick the stalls at night check just to lower the clean up in the morning.
    I doubt that the SIL is interested in the OP's opinion...sounds like they are all riding without helmets anyway...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    4,990

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    Quote Originally Posted by microbovine View Post
    So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

    We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.
    Hahahaha. Absolutely true about being paradise for many species of arthropod-Americans.

    I'm slowly going green. I used to use feed-through fly control, and had worse flies with it than without. I think it's because I was killing off my dung beetles - who manage an astonishing amount of manure - and because there are so many deer and other wildlife that flies have plenty of un-fed-through-poo in which to reproduce. Now I let nature take its course, and have been rewarded over the years not just with dung beetles but also praying mantis, dragonflies, and wasps.

    Sadly, the homemade fly repellent I've tried (with essential oils, no pesticides) doesn't work for us down here in my corner of swampy SC. Wipe II does a wonderful job, though. Care to share your recipe?

    I only have one horse who will poo in his shed, but I compost his and use it for the garden. The younger boys go in their pasture, and three quarters of the year it gets spread by the mower when we cut the fields. During winter, I just let it go. Unsightly, but one only has so many hours in a short winter day.

    I'm thinking of adding guineas or some kind of free-range poultry, but I'm not sure how long they'd survive, what with the bobcats, foxes and coyote.



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,671

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    What helps with horses avoiding flies here;
    (There are chicken and cattle farms all around us)

    Night turn out.
    Effective stall fans.
    Barn Swallows.
    Bats.
    P F Harris Natural Fly Repellent for horses when ridden.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  15. #75
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    15,904

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    Is this in a STALL or an outdoor run in. I don't advocate it (by any stretch) but some people seem to leave manure in pastures/run ins and then just use the tractor to split it up and spead it. Could that be what she meant?
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  16. #76
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    Citronella and Skin-so-soft in a water/apple cider vinegar base. It has to be re-applied frequently. I forgot one thing, we hang those plastic jar traps as well (the ones with the fly sex attractant).

    I think the biggest key is removing manure and piling it up. If you can see flies on your manure pile, you need to turn it more often. Back in Virginia, we had soil in 30-45 days, but it takes longer down here. More like 6 months because of the sand.

    Also, Quest does not harm dung beetles. Ivermectrin kills them. We also have a healthy dung beetle population.

    We also have guineas. They are very helpful, actually. You have to start with more chicks than you want (10-14) because there will be some losses if they free range (the hens nest on the gorund so you will lose most of your hens). We are down to 7 and holding. Lock them up for the first 14 weeks in a coop with feed and water, then let one or two out per day and bring them back in at night for the next week or so. Finally, let them out during the day and they might come back in at night. If not, they will pick out a nice tree to roost in. They are from Africa and are highly suspicious of everything. In fact, they are amusing to watch because if you change anything in your yard, they will stop and scream at it. They are not known for intelligence. Ours act as if every day brings a brand new world. It's been over a week since I put up the scarecrow and they still sound the alarm every morning when they pass it on their rounds.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    11,821

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    Ask her if she likes to live in her own poop and pee? How about never flushing the toilet and just mashing it down?
    Can we say serious respiratory problems, Thrush etc. not to mention the smell and flies! Why are some people so ignorant or arrogant that they refuse to learn the correct way to do things.
    You can't fix stupid, Maybe a vet or farrier will clue her in.. or does she not feel she needs them either??
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    588

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    Haha, but they DO. They poop on their hay, and then eat it. They dribble grain out of their mouth over a pile of manure, and then pick thru to eat the pieces.
    It is gross, but true, that there exist horses whose indiscriminate lips do not recoil from manure. I have three fat, happy mares who live on 5 lovely wooded acres with scenic views and 24/7 access to good hay. I use a Gator to both distribute hay and collect the poop. After feeding there's always a few wisps of loose hay left in the Gator bed, so I dump the poop on top of it to make it slide out easier at the manure pile. Well, no sooner do I dump my first bucket of crap onto the old hay in the Gator than my disgusting mares flock around to fight over who gets to eat it. I mean, not two feet away they have freshly-thrown, delicious, non-contaminated hay in nice, clean feeders. They actually seem to prefer the manure hay. Gack, it's dreadful.

    They also love to chew on the Gator itself, but that's another story.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    FWIW, I know how some of you recoil in horror at the thought of throwing away beautiful manure, however...

    Depending on what you bed in, it will change the pH make it less useful to whoever might want it.

    Depending on your area, composting more than one or two horses might be a no-no.

    Not everyone has the abilities or room to compost.

    I had the local ag folks out to discuss running pvc with holes for air, etc etc, turning, concrete floor, etc etc, so I could compost for eight horses back when I had a barn. Awesome ideas they had. I called every single nursery in the book within about an hour's drive, and they most certainly did NOT want any beautiful manure.

    So I tossed it, other than the oldest, blackest stuff at the bottom of the pile, which my neighbor came and grabbed up and then gave me scary large veggies later.

    Also, some "greener" places accept compostable items separate from trash and recycle. My county does.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  20. #80
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
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    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    626

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJenners View Post
    FWIW, I know how some of you recoil in horror at the thought of throwing away beautiful manure, however...

    Depending on what you bed in, it will change the pH make it less useful to whoever might want it.

    Depending on your area, composting more than one or two horses might be a no-no.

    Not everyone has the abilities or room to compost.

    I had the local ag folks out to discuss running pvc with holes for air, etc etc, turning, concrete floor, etc etc, so I could compost for eight horses back when I had a barn. Awesome ideas they had. I called every single nursery in the book within about an hour's drive, and they most certainly did NOT want any beautiful manure.

    So I tossed it, other than the oldest, blackest stuff at the bottom of the pile, which my neighbor came and grabbed up and then gave me scary large veggies later.

    Also, some "greener" places accept compostable items separate from trash and recycle. My county does.
    You reminded me of this cool system that I read about -

    http://www.o2compost.com/content/Bay_Systems_Sm.htm
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing



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