The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 124
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,525

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    I guess you guys have never been at a barn with a manure spreader that spreads manure on the fields?
    I wouldn't board at a barn that spreads manure of the fields. We spread manure on our crop fields (field corn and soybean) but never, ever on the pastures or hay fields.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    71

    Default

    They spread the manure in the enormous grass jump field during the spring. The rest gets spread on the neighbour's crop fields. Not the turnout fields. But even if they did, that's not the same as having a horse stand in a stall of his own pulverized manure.



  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    7,912

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hundredacres View Post
    I wouldn't board at a barn that spreads manure of the fields. We spread manure on our crop fields (field corn and soybean) but never, ever on the pastures or hay fields.
    Why?

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

    Default

    I guess everyone has their own particular flavor of "unnacceptable" when it comes to handling poo. :
    Click here before you buy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    How is this your business?
    If I saw someone doing something so stupid I'd make it my business to say something about it and give them reasons why it is just wrong on so many levels.
    One of the most stupid ideas for horse care I've ever heard of.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,525

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ridethehide View Post
    There are also horses who pulverize their poop to dust during the night and there is no way in heck that I would leave it. The stall turns black and stinks. Everything gets removed on almost a daily basis and new shavings added.
    So you would strip 4-5 wheelbarrows out of a stall daily if it looked like indoor arena footing from a stall walker?

    Breathing in ammonia is not healthy for anyone, horses or humans. Flies, parasites, smell, thrush.
    What if it did not smell at all, no thrush, did not attract flies, just looked like tan sawdust, instead of lilly white?.

    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    and give them reasons why it is just wrong on so many levels.
    One of the most stupid ideas for horse care I've ever heard of.
    Like I said, it is possible to work, and I would have to see that particular system before condemning it. Sometimes things will shock you, and the older I get, the more I find that "rules" may not apply in all situations, but can be totally acceptable as far as asthetics, and health.



  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,479

    Default

    My horses are rarely stalled but when they are I go out before I go to bed around midnight and pick stalls. It's done again in the morning while they eat, first thing.

    Normally my 2 fat horses are kept on a 250 x 250 dry lot with a run in,
    We go out in the morning with the little tractor and cart and pick the lot and run in.
    I pick the run in each time I go out to feed or whatever and then the whole lot is picked again early evening before dark.
    I check and pick if needed the run in one more time before I go to bed.

    I 'ain't" going to have one of my horses standing in poop,
    No horse should have to.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    9,212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    They do it all of the time. Some horses are neat in their stalls, but others are total pigs, and poop all over. If they poop next to their feed bucket, they will be searching for crumbs on/around that pile the next meal. Same with when they poop where they have spread their hay for the night.
    I haven't seen what you're describing, and I've been around horses a long time. Says something about your horsekeeping skills then. I'm not going to keep arguing with you. I think many of your ideas are crazy anyway.

    This thread has possibly given FHC a new idea for how to manage the stalls in her barn!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,110

    Default

    I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,525

    Default

    grayarabpony, you are always entertaining The fact that you have not seen a horse that is a pig in their stall says a lot about your level of experience.

    I guess you have not seen horses either that tend to like to poop IN their feed or water buckets. I shifted one horses water buckets into each corner of his stall to find a place he would stop doing that. Thankfully, he gave it up after about 6 months of driving me crazy.

    I still remember also when one of my self care boarders met me in the morning and asked me if I knew what a full house was. She was very mad at her horse who managed to fill not only both of his water buckets that night, but his feed bucket too.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,525

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    Yes.



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    9,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    I guess you guys have never been at a barn with a manure spreader that spreads manure on the fields?
    If I were I wouldn't be there long.

    My sympathies to the OP. Do you get gnats in AZ? If not it's a shame. A barn swarming with clouds of gnats is very educational.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ldaziens View Post
    I am also confused about paying for a manure dumpster. We compost ours. I guess it makes sense if one had a lot of horses on a very small property - or something. That could be a profitable business - charging to pick up the manure, then composting it and selling the compost - making money from the suppliers and the consumers.

    And, I, like others am really confused about the "smashing", which would take more time & effort than just picking it up.
    there are a lot of places where you can not compost that must manure.. the manure must be carted away.



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,379

    Default

    That's what I'm thinking.

    Harrowing fields and spreading manure on fields is 100% normal and customary practice in this region. And no, we're not making Mother Nature cry because we are destroying the earth.

    We are adding nutrients back to the soil that were removed by grazing or haying. You soil test and add lime/fertilizer as necessary depending on what the land is being used for.

    I guess everyone could pay out the nose to have it all removed, so a company or gov't entity can compost it and sell it (keeping the money of course). Then the owner could incur additional expense by purchasing more fertilizer for their now depleted hayfields and pastures, which fertilizer will run off when it rains.

    What is telling to me is not how fancy a place is or how obsessed the owner is with their animal's poo. I look at the condition of the animals. If they are in good health, alert, and in good condition - that's all that matters.





    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    She your SIL? Talk to your brother if your suggestions fall on deaf ears. Explain in vivid detail what life would be like if she continues to do this.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,245

    Default

    Smashed poo in a very dry climate will tend to become powder/dust. That means it gets everywhere; water buckets, feed, hay, coat, lungs etc.etc..
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

    We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.

    Our horses are kept in stalls with runs. We use shavings in the winter and swept stall mats the rest of the year. Our horses all sleep in their sandy paddocks and all but one poops in their stall primarily. The paddocks and stalls are picked at least once per day. We even strip our chicken coop regularly and replace the shavings (it has an above ground floor).
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    We do pretty much exactly what microbovine is doing: fly predators really help in the summer to keep the flies down to a dull roar. We compost our shavings/manure mix and spread it on the fields. We have a poop stomper(walker) who could justify a complete stall strip daily. We sometimes will poop pick the stalls at night check just to lower the clean up in the morning.
    I doubt that the SIL is interested in the OP's opinion...sounds like they are all riding without helmets anyway...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by microbovine View Post
    So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

    We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.
    Hahahaha. Absolutely true about being paradise for many species of arthropod-Americans.

    I'm slowly going green. I used to use feed-through fly control, and had worse flies with it than without. I think it's because I was killing off my dung beetles - who manage an astonishing amount of manure - and because there are so many deer and other wildlife that flies have plenty of un-fed-through-poo in which to reproduce. Now I let nature take its course, and have been rewarded over the years not just with dung beetles but also praying mantis, dragonflies, and wasps.

    Sadly, the homemade fly repellent I've tried (with essential oils, no pesticides) doesn't work for us down here in my corner of swampy SC. Wipe II does a wonderful job, though. Care to share your recipe?

    I only have one horse who will poo in his shed, but I compost his and use it for the garden. The younger boys go in their pasture, and three quarters of the year it gets spread by the mower when we cut the fields. During winter, I just let it go. Unsightly, but one only has so many hours in a short winter day.

    I'm thinking of adding guineas or some kind of free-range poultry, but I'm not sure how long they'd survive, what with the bobcats, foxes and coyote.
    Analytical thinking is the first casualty when opposing sides polarize, and that shows lack of common sense on both sides.
    Denny Emerson



  20. #80
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,245

    Default

    What helps with horses avoiding flies here;
    (There are chicken and cattle farms all around us)

    Night turn out.
    Effective stall fans.
    Barn Swallows.
    Bats.
    P F Harris Natural Fly Repellent for horses when ridden.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



Similar Threads

  1. Poop on Gravel Clean up
    By spotnnotfarm in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Mar. 4, 2013, 02:57 PM
  2. How to clean cat with poop stuck on rump?
    By whicker in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2013, 03:50 PM
  3. Yes, You Can Clean Up Horse Poop in Your Wedding Dress
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun. 10, 2011, 08:06 PM
  4. Replies: 192
    Last Post: May. 6, 2010, 04:22 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sep. 28, 2009, 08:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness