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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    3,383

    Default Broken legs and recovery.

    This article paints a pretty grim picture but these injuries happened at speed with baby horses.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog...oken-leg-horse

    I knew a horse a decade or so ago 'Patches' (A quarab gelding) who broke his leg kicking a stall wall. It cost his owner 3000.00 in vet bills but he was good as new afterwards. I didn't think to ask what sort of cast/sling if any they used.

    How many others here personally knew/know horses who broke their legs, got proper vet care, recovered and went back to work.
    The Denver Broncos went to visit an orphanage. "It's so sad looking into their faces so devoid of hope." Sara aged 6



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2013
    Location
    SoCal
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    379

    Default

    My BO's cutting horse broke his leg from kicking in his stall. This was back in 1998 (I didn't know him or the horse then. Funny, he JUST told me this last night). Horse was treated and recovered, and while was never a cutter again, was an awfully good trail horse. He just passed away two years ago at 28.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    Define broken leg. I have had condylar fractures, sesamoid fractures, slab fractures, chip fractures and cracked cannon bones to name a few. All recovered. I had one catastrophic breakdown in my career, it was shattered sesamoids that took the suspensory ligament with it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2010
    Posts
    75

    Default

    We had a 7yo gelding who got kicked in the shoulder and ended up with a T-shaped fracture of the ulna. It was non-displaced so, after three months of strict stall rest and another few months of gradual return to turnout, he healed beautifully. The fracture was in the elbow so he probably ended up with some degree of arthritis at some point, but he was still perfectly sound at 13 when my mother sold him (with full disclosure of the injury).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    My horse was kicked and shattered a split bone about 7 years ago. He had surgery to remove it and healed up quite nicely after 3 months of stall rest/light turnout. You would never know it except for a small calcified bump on that leg.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2008
    Location
    Somewhere in Texas YEEHAW!
    Posts
    850

    Default

    My OTTB got a vertical fracture on his cannon bone when he was a 2 year old. They only kept going with him because he was showing a lot of promise and his 2 siblings were very successful. He made 24 starts from 3-5 and won a few but they said when he came back he wasn't as good as he had been. Who knows if that was because of the injury or just that he was older. I don't know how they treated it, but he's never had any issues with it since.
    OTTB CONNECT
    FB group for all things related to non racing Thoroughbreds.. Click here to join ~~~> OTTB CONNECT



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,459

    Default

    My Bluey fractured his femur. There's no fixing that. Broken legs mean many different things, you have to be more specific.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,573

    Default

    I've had to euthenize two with nasty breaks.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,848

    Default

    I knew an Arabian broodmare who I was told "shattered" her pastern. It looked shattered - very mangled and her hoof wasn't pointing in the correct direction. She limped because mechanically there had to be a limp, but didn't appear to feel any pain - she was stunningly beautiful and always had a happy expression on her face, and she would just go nuts playing in turnout! I know she spent time in a sling and had some surgery, but don't know if there was metal in there to support her or how it healed, or what the actual break was. It was clearly an expensive recovery, but she managed to recover enough to have no problems carrying the extra weight of foals.

    I don't understand why some horses are able to survive the extra weight on the other legs and some aren't. They can recover at least to some extent, yet even a horse getting the top care Barbaro was can lose the fight to laminitis or other damage to the previously uninjured legs.

    Other times there are horses who survive and it's hard to believe they could have. It wasn't a break, but my rescue mare was unable to stand on one of her legs when I got her. She doesn't have any indication of having had veterinary care when she was injured, but must have had something to not succumb to infections despite the fact she shows no signs of having had stitches to try to repair some of the damage of even close up the cuts. Somewhere along the line she had tangled in barbed wire and shredded the top of her right front leg. That leg is now just skin, scar tissue and bone with none of the normal soft tissue on the outside of the forearm.
    http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2773/4...8f6d3308f3.jpg

    She had already had a foal and somehow survived the pregnancy, sale at auction, ride in a packed truck from the auction toward Mexico, and being starved while unable to put much weight on that leg, and without her other legs breaking down. It's just amazing that a horse can survive something like that at all, and she now runs and bucks and leaps and jumps and shows zero sign of distress despite the fact that right front acts about like a cane, moved from her shoulder muscle. Her knee is actually bent about as much as it is capable of bending in that picture - luckily she is well behaved about it, because otherwise she would be hell on trimmers.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I have had several ottb's with fractured seasamoids. Some went on to eventing careers. Had one horse who broke his leg in his stall overnight. I have no idea what he did, but he broke his ulna near the top. A big chunk was broken off. He had to be PTS.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2004
    Posts
    2,622

    Default

    I had a horse who was kicked and had a saucer fracture of a rear cannon bone. ~5 months of stall rest but recovered 100%, not visible, returned to his jumper career.

    He was always weight bearing though. I'd imagine the more catastophic fractures have a much lower recovery rate.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,128

    Default

    About 20 years ago, the barn where I was a working student had a horse who had broken a leg in his younger years as a lesson horse. I don't know what exactly he broke, but he was used without restrictions-- jumping, dressage, etc. Shortly after I left, the school had to put down a young horse with a spiral fracture to his cannon bone so I agree with others, it totally depends on what they break.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I personally know of a draft horse who broke her rear canon bone. The owner splinted it with pvc pipe, and kept her sedated to the gills and in her stall for a number of weeks. He didn't mention a sling. I think he tied her head up so she couldn't lie down. When I met her, she was part of a team taking people for sloop sleigh rides at a maple sugar camp. The leg was unsightly (large lump at the fracture site), but she seemed sound and capable of work.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2011
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    186

    Default

    A few years ago a beautiful big hanoverian gelding I was riding and showing with a friend was kicked in the pasture. The kicker had hind shoes!Poor guy's humerus was shattered into multiple tiny pieces. i saw the xray and was devistated. First vet to see him only stitched up a small cut on his cannon and wrapped the forearm. No xrays were done at that time.Vet refused to come back out the next day when horse in obvious distress. Local vet friend hurried over and took the picture. She helped him over the bridge a short time later. I still miss him.
    BO still turns horses out with hind shoes! Friend and I no longer board there.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    hamburg, pa USA
    Posts
    474

    Default

    I have a nine year old mare, who's leg was broken at two days old. Her dam stepped on her and broke her hind cannon bone. She was rushed to New Bolton Center and Dr. Richardson operated.

    You can see the leg is thicker then the other and she has a small lunp on the inside. She does moves short on that leg. Otherwise, she is sound.

    She has been started under saddle and has been on some trail rides, but I don't push her beyond that.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2009
    Posts
    573

    Default

    A friend had his two-year-old Arabian stallion break a leg while being lunged in the round pen. I don't recall the details of the break, but the full leg cast went from hoof to elbow.

    At the six month mark, the cast smelled terrible, and the owner feared that gangrene was developing. He had the vet out to do the final deed, but the vet suggested they remove the cast first to see the condition of the fracture. It turned out that the horse was just fine - the leg had healed, but the dirt/slime/sweat/whatever had created a stinking mess at skin-level. The skin healed quickly after the cast removal. I don't know if the horse was ever performance-sound, as his intended career was to be an endurance horse, but he could cover mares, allowing his bloodline to be salvaged for the breeding program. He actually covered his first mare while wearing the cast, with the help of half a dozen people.
    “Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar.”
    Drew Carey



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