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  1. #1
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    Default Any articles, handouts, etc for the scribing newbie?

    We are always challenged filling this spot at a show. People are afraid of it, intimidated. Please share your suggestions for resources for the Virgin Scribe
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. (Steven Wright)



  2. #2
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    I went to a scribe clinic. It was fun. I got handouts there about abbreviations and rules. The number one the judge told us is DO NOT mention to them anything about a horse and rider. They do not want to know if this is the first horses test, or how hard they've been working etc. They don't even want you to say you know a rider.
    Also if you miss a score someone along the way for a movement if you have time ask but if not you need to wait till the end and go back to it. Try not to talk durning the test. Also read your judge. Some like to talk a little to you some not so much. Also make sure you have everything in order. Always pay attention to the number and make sure it matches the number on the horse. Be sure to write the number on the test that you are scribing at the top and make sure that matches the sticker or name that they have on there already. They also said if it's cold it's nice to bring a blanket for the judge in case and have a red pen for errors. Bring your own just in case but they should supply one. You have to get there early because you go in and get the test and schedule and have to make sure everything is in order for the judge before the show starts.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


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  3. #3
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    Aug. 6, 2012
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    149

    Default

    The USDF has a Guide for Scribes.

    I'm a beginner scribe and I have to admit, it is very intimidating. I'm afraid I'll make the judges mad, I won't get all the comments written correctly, and that the competitors won't be able to read the remarks.

    That being said, the place I volunteer at offers reduced schooling fees and goodie bags for volunteers. So it's scary, but the lure of a free t-shirt is too strong to resist.



  4. #4
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    Apr. 29, 2012
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    Default

    Great topic! I'd love to scribe -- what a great learning opportunity -- but have never volunteered to do so because of the intimidation factor and an assumption that it required some specific training. It's nice to hear more about it!



  5. #5
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    Feb. 22, 2012
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    MS Gulf Coast
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    Default

    Scribing is the one job I haven't done yet at a show, and I really want to. The intimidation factor has a lot to do with that. I think the way to get around that is to scribe at a schooling show. I just haven't found one that fits into my schedule yet.

    Is there a link to the USDF Guide for Scribes?



  6. #6
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    Default

    do a search on this forum (start with the "similar threads" section at the bottom of this page) ... there are many many resources and threads with advice (good and less-good) ...

    of course there is a link to the USDF Guide for Scribes ... just google (you guessed it): "usdf scribe guide"

    http://www.usdf.org/about/about-dres...g-scribing.asp

    if there is interest, I'd be happy to compile the advice on various messages and threads ...

    My strong advice is to scribe at a recognized show, but the lower levels. Experienced licensed judges are easier to scribe for than newly-minted or learner judges.

    In any case, don't be intimidated ... most judges LOVE to teach and very much appreciate the help they get from the person next to them in the booth. Just keep in mind you're there to help the judge help the competitor. Your learning and insight will come naturally as part of the process.
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2009
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    New Zealand
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    The number one the judge told us is DO NOT mention to them anything about a horse and rider. They do not want to know if this is the first horses test, or how hard they've been working etc. They don't even want you to say you know a rider.
    GREAT advice! This is annoying. Judges are trying to maintain professional detachment and judge just the test in front of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by AllWeatherGal View Post
    My strong advice is to scribe at a recognized show, but the lower levels. Experienced licensed judges are easier to scribe for than newly-minted or learner judges.

    In any case, don't be intimidated ... most judges LOVE to teach and very much appreciate the help they get from the person next to them in the booth. Just keep in mind you're there to help the judge help the competitor. Your learning and insight will come naturally as part of the process.
    I also second this.

    I don't want to sound condescending, but I'm not sure how to phrase this - I guess am a little unsure of why it is so intimidating. It is not a difficult job, and it's very interesting. Just listen and write. I mean, sure, it would be pretty overwhelming to jump into writing for the first time for an upper-level test with a long test full of short, complicated movements, but the lower levels are fairly straight-forward and the judge's comments should be familiar to most riders who have done even a little dressage. The tests are nice and short so you get a break fairly often. Most judges I have scribed for explain how they work before the tests begin ("I'll say the number of the movement, then the comment, then the score"), especially if they know you are new, and have been kind and encouraging.

    You learn so much from scribing. It's something we encourage all Pony Club parents (especially the non-horsey ones, because it's a job they can do without experience and educates them at the same time) and older riders to do it at least once.

    We had a mum recently who wanted to help but was worried about not knowing what to do, so she sat in on a test and watched what the writer did. She then knew what to expect and was quite comfortable that she could do it. So perhaps ask to sit in at a local show (if your rules allow it) if you are anxious?
    Last edited by kalidascope; Apr. 4, 2013 at 04:08 PM. Reason: Typo



  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kalidascope View Post
    I guess am a little unsure of why it is so intimidating. It is not a difficult job, and it's very interesting. Just listen and write.
    Judges are people, too

    IMO the most intimidating job is gate keeper at a CDI. I've done it once and worried the whole time that I'd drop the rail or trip or otherwise do something stupid to distract the horse (or rider) and negatively impact someone's ride. That was when I wasn't worrying about makeup sweating down my face or whether my panty lines were showing on the videos
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff



  9. #9
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    You know what would be cool?

    Someone should strap a Go Pro camera to a helmet, and sit down and scribe a test with a judge. Done indoors, without wind sounds, you would see what the scribe sees...which is mostly the hard copy of the test

    Might be a fun way of showing how it's not that hard?
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. (Steven Wright)



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