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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2002
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    2,914

    Default Kitchen cabinets - new? reface? paint?

    Thinking about re-doing my (small) galley style kitchen. For sure I'm getting new countertops (old formica ugliness has got to go!). I appreciated that undermount sink thread - know what kind of sink install I want now For cabinets, I don't have a ton but who has refaced vs. doing new and what did you think of it? Or painted them - how hard/messy involved was that?? Trying to do this a little on the less expensive side. My counters will be fairly inexpensive to do as I don't have much counter space.
    ~* Life is the dance you choose *~



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2004
    Location
    Canada
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    3,636

    Default

    It really depends on the style of the cabinet. Sometimes, painting them just doesn't update them because they are an older style that is never seen today. Refacing often costs as much as a new kitchen does and a lot of kitchen places are realizing they are WAY overpriced and starting to have reasonable prices.

    Painting isn't that big of a deal, but it looks best if you can pay a bit to have a painter come in and spray them.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2008
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    285

    Default

    Pics of the current cabinets? If they are a style that could look new if you simpley repaint or reface them, then that isn't such a terrible task. I'm assuming you have some DIY experience...if they were a really trendy style when they were put in (60s or 70s madness) then you might need to go with new ones.

    Also, obviously you would have to be happy with the current layout to repaint. IF so, repainting and replacing hardware can really change the look of a kitchen.
    TPR!
    Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Inc
    www.goodhorse.org



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Default

    I think getting a pro to spray the doors is worth it. And if they are an old style of cabinet door, then refacing with new doors and drawer fronts can be fairly economical-most big box stores just order the stuff for that, and you either install it yourself, or find someone to do it for you. However, if the current cabinets aren't solid wood or are in bad shape, you might be able to demo them yourself, and get a new set installed that will support new countertops. You can really save on hardware if you get the contractor packs at the big box stores, or online. There are usually 10 to 12 in a pack for pulls, and that is a big savings.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Default

    I painted mine to cover up the 70s ugliness and added new hardware and new appliances. HUGE change in my kitchen.

    However if it didn't cost a bloody fortune I'd have torn them out and had new ones put in. My kitchen is really big and has a crap-ton of cabinets and counter space. To tear them out and replace would be big money, and if I'm spending big money then I'd want to change the layout a bit, which is bigger money. Add in new counters, HUGE money. I'd have refaced, but the bases aren't decent quality and not normal sizes, so it would be like putting lipstick on a pig. And quartz counters would probably crush my current cabinets, LOL! Some day I'll do a gut and re-do, when I can stomach spending that kind of money.

    Painting them is pretty darned easy. Even with a big kitchen with a buttload of cabinets I'd pick a section and remove all doors and hardware, wipe down with TSP (a grease cutter) and then run a fine sanding block over the shiny parts. I'd paint those doors and bases and the next day hang them all back up and start on the next section. I have a big kitchen table so I spread a plastic tablecloth on the table and painted the cabinets on there. My kitchen looks loads better than it did despite the paint and hardware change only taking a few days and $150. Of course the appliances help and those were more expensive, but I'm big into cooking and baking and needed better appliances anyway. And I got them all on clearance.

    Here's some of the befores:
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...battery011.jpg
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...battery010.jpg

    Here are some afters:
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...tchenredo2.png
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...tchenredo1.png
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...ingJuly009.jpg
    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17...ingJuly007.jpg
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
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    5,755

    Default

    I did some research on the Rustoleum cabinet kit and found quite a few real-life (non-paid) reviews, with pictures, that looked fantastic. Our cabinets are just plain, flat-faced and I plan to add some mouldings and do the Rustoleum thing to them this year. Add some new pulls and voila - like new!
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    17,492

    Default

    Misty Blue, you have almost my kitchen layout! But, the first owner who designed the house didn't leave enough room for a normal size dining room table. We're ripping out the pennisula, swinging a cabinet around to the wall to extend the cabinet run on that side and putting in an island. More room for the table, and I really miss an island. Then I'm painting the whole thing with the Rustoleum kit. The hardest part will be matching the wood floor under the cabinets we're tearing out and refinishing the floor. I can't wait!

    Tile in the hall first though.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2004
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    922

    Default

    It depends. Do you like your door style? Do you like the look of painted cabinets? How handy or DIY are you?

    I've seen the Rustoleum's in real life. The ones that are done skillfully look pretty darn good. The ones that are aren't... eh, well, you probably get the idea.

    If you are not handy yourself but want a change and your cabinet boxes are in good condition, you can order new cabinet doors and have someone come in to refinish the cabinet boxes for you.

    Like I said, all depends.

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    I did some research on the Rustoleum cabinet kit and found quite a few real-life (non-paid) reviews, with pictures, that looked fantastic. Our cabinets are just plain, flat-faced and I plan to add some mouldings and do the Rustoleum thing to them this year. Add some new pulls and voila - like new!
    Lucy (Precious Star) - 1994 TB mare; happily reunited with her colt Touch the Stars



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
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    USA
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    Default

    Has anyone here actually used the Rustoleum cabinet kit? I'd love to do it, I'm pretty handy and artsy so hopefully I wouldn't completely ruin my cabinets! How difficult was it? Did you find the package covered the linear footage it said it would or did you need to buy an extra kit?

    TIA!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
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    4,716

    Default

    We painted our 1960s cabinets, but admittedly the fronts were totally plain. We got the sprayer, made the countertop ourselves, and got a big sink with new faucet. I think the whole cost, including the sink which was $300, was under $1000. We used regular indoor paint (behr ultra) and a lot of prep work.

    Here it was before:
    http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a3...ps1669adf5.png

    after:
    http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a3...chencorner.jpg


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 1999
    Location
    MD
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    3,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    I did some research on the Rustoleum cabinet kit and found quite a few real-life (non-paid) reviews, with pictures, that looked fantastic. Our cabinets are just plain, flat-faced and I plan to add some mouldings and do the Rustoleum thing to them this year. Add some new pulls and voila - like new!
    We used the Rustoleum Cabinet transformations kit in our kitchen and it looks great. Mr. Indy did a fantastic job. BUT it took him like three times as long as the video that came with kit claimed it would. Probably because he's incredibly meticulous and made sure to do every step perfectly, but the result is really quite nice. It was a very nice, affordable alternative to new or refaced cabinets.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
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    2,423

    Default

    What are you're cabinets made of? Wood or laminate?

    I redid my little kitchen last year. I had painted laminate cabinets that needed to be repainted. After quite a bit of research, I decided to do the Rustoleum thing. First I had to strip the cabinets. Great. After stripping everything and getting a couple doors repainted, I realized that it looked like crap. The finish was fine, the door underneath looked bad. The thick paint I took off hid a lot of sins.

    Plan B. I found MDF drawer/cabinet fronts online that were pretty inexpensive, even with shipping. I opted to spend a little extra on a routed pattern in the doors and plain drawer fronts. When I got them, my efforts to not look cheap backfired. I scrapped the doors I got and re-ordered plain ones, with a nice edge on them.

    If you have wood fronts or go with MDF replacement, don't waste your money on the Rustoleum kit. It's designed to adhere to shiny, slippery plastic. If you don't have the plastic thing going on, a good flat latex paint and an acrylic sealer are just as good. I didn't like their sealer. It's kind of finicky. I found that I got a better finish with a spray can of matte acrylic sealer. The glaze is pointless on dark colors (I did espresso or kona brown), so in the end I paid nearly $100 for 2 quarts of latex paint. Not my smartest buy.

    I decided to spend a little bit on hardware and it was a good decision. If you really LIKE what comes in the 12 pack of knobs, go for it. If you don't, every time you look at it, you'll think about the stuff you REALLY wanted. At least I would.

    I also repainted my fake butcher block laminate counters. I skipped the expensive Rustoleum counter kit and got 2 quarts of their counter paint in different colors. I used those 2 to make 2 more intermediate shades and sponge painted it. It was $40 for the paint. I've heard it's a bit temperature sensitive, so I got a couple glass cutting boards next to the stove. I've had it for 6 months & so far, so good. I didn't use an additional sealer. It doesn't look like stone, but does look a heck of a lot better.

    All told, I think my galley remodel cost under $500. It could have been cheaper if I didn't try so hard to be cheap. I didn't replace any of my appliances or paint them. I should have also spent the extra $5 or $8 dollars per door to have them primed and sanded. It turned out to be a big time drain. One place I checked out had the option of a melamine interior side (that I scoffed at b/c of the price (a few dollars)) in hindsight, it would have given things a more professional look.
    Last edited by red mares; Apr. 4, 2013 at 03:04 PM.



  13. #13
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Default

    The biggest problem a friend ran into with the kitchen cabinet repainting was with the pro. The man did a great job, but he kept getting called by his major client who pays top dollar and expects to be first. Because my friend's kitchen was a relatively small job, she knew up front that it was a possibility that there would be conflicts, but it turned out to be a real problem. Her kitchen turned out beautifully, and was a major improvement over the original kitchen, but it took quite a while longer than she ever thought possible.

    You can always try painting them, or refacing, and if it doesn't work out then go for the bigger remodel.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  14. #14
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    Oct. 14, 2010
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    BTW, I wouldn't recommend regular Rustoleum or a latex without a sealer, at least not if you go with white. Mine were painted with classic white Rustoleum when I moved in and looked like crap - yellow & dirty. I did a quick repaint with gloss trim paint and short term it looked better (had to), but within a couple years it looked pretty nasty too. It didn't help that the original paint job was lousy. They looked like what they were - badly painted cabinets. But they went well with the 2 sq ft hole in the living room wall.



  15. #15
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    31,467

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    if the cabinets are done and you need something on a budget, Ikea has some very nice stuff that is affordable.

    If the nearest store wasn't on the other side of Atlanta from me....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    Default

    soloudinhere...what a fantastic improvement! Love the backsplash too, makes the whole look!

    LauraKY, I lucked out with the table area, nice and big. I have a table for 10 in the space and it's not crowded. A nice surprise when we saw the house, it's not a big house. 1450 sf on the main floor, but the kitchen/dining area is 14x22.
    I love the layout in terms of working in the kitchen, very nice flow for moving around when preparing things. And the peninsula is a great work space and spot to put serving bowls down. But you're right...I miss having an island. If I ever redo the kitchen I'll gut it and then reconfigure for a huge island with storage underneath instead of a peninsula and then add a wall of shelves/cubby storage. I love islands for work space that can double as extra seating too.

    The Rustoleum sets work well, they look really nice. They do take a longer than the company says they'll take. The cabinet and the brick sets are great. The countertop kit looks great for a month. But if you actually use your kitchen the countertop won't stay nice, it'll chip off. If you have an ugly fireplace or anything else ugly brick colors, google image the rustoleum brick kit.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default

    IKEA also has a super easy installation system for the top cabinets. You put a horizontal rail up, screwed into the wall studs, and the top cabinets hook onto it and slide together.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in SW ON
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    259

    Default

    Ah! Good question. I had been thinking about painting my cabinets b/c I'm not fond of the colour. They are solid wood though so that's what held me back compared to the quality and cost of some new ones. However, I lucked out. The kitchen colour had been this awfully done red. I re-painted it to Mythic Paints Sand in My Shoes colour and now I don't mind them. The red was way too much. Now, nothing clashes and what is supposed to stand out does. One day I'd still like to gut the kitchen though...but like someone else said...BIG money. Especially when I really want to move my fridge and stove away from each other.

    It's amazing what paint can do!

    Before and After Photo Album

    https://picasaweb.google.com/schmenn...eat=directlink

    FF


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    soloudinhere...what a fantastic improvement! Love the backsplash too, makes the whole look!
    Thanks!

    I think this demonstrates another point-- which is that the overall appearance of high end or quality comes from the details.

    That backsplash is actually from Costco. It was a huge, huge, HUGE pain to install (so much grout!!!) but in the end it LOOKS fancy. It runs the whole length of the kitchen from the stove to the door.

    We also sprang for some stainless steel tiles for the stove area since that needed to be heat resistant. The end effect makes the kitchen feel higher end than it really is-- same with the fancy sink and faucet.

    Countertops are Formica, and not even the fancy finish formica-- regular semi matte Formica.



  20. #20
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    Mar. 22, 2000
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    We painted our cabinets and put new hardware on them (new handles and new hinges). Made a world of difference! We used a Behr paint and primer in one, with a high gloss finish. It was MUCH less expensive than buying all new cabinets or refacing all of them. If you are planning on repainting your cabinets, make sure you clean them well and sand them down before painting.

    Here are our before and afters, don't mind the mess in the before picture!

    After: http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...ps672842a2.jpg

    Before: http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...ps95fe1d65.jpg



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