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  1. #21
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    Ever since I watched Food, Inc., I have been very concerned about Monsanto and what amounts to mafia like techniques of ruining small time farmers. But then, it seems to go hand and hand with the so called politicians who are running this country...I truely believe that the majority are really terrorists, because nobody in Washington seems to have our country's best interests at heart anymore.
    Other countries are way ahead of us in many ways, including prohibiting GMO's. I don't believe the research is there and I am afraid that in a few more generations, if not sooner, we will see the negative effects.
    Lori T
    www.calypsofarmeventers.blogspot.com
    www.facebook.com/LTEquine for product updates on the lines I rep


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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by randomequine View Post
    Haven't done enough research on the act itself to speak to it, but I must say that GMOs don't scare me....but that's because I've done plant gene splicing, etc...
    It's not the theory of plant gene splicing that is scary, it's the outcome of planting genetically modified plants around the world as if it's no big deal.

    Not to mention the giant Monsanto and their "mafia" tactics (great phrase!) They are already so powerful, I am not sure why they need protection at all!

    Very scary and really disappointed in the administration for passing it.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Dec. 29, 2012
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    Yeah I am scared big time. Just common sense a company that big doesn't need protection. Now small local ag needs all the protection it can get. Who in the heck would give up their right to pure food ? Its about choice. And when you no longer have a choice then you will know what all us scardy cats are worried about.



  4. #24
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    Watch the documentary "Food, Inc"



  5. #25
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    It wasn't just the Monsanto Protection Act that got stuck into the bill that would allow the federal government to continue to operate. Apparently the three biggest meat companies got something added for them as well in the House.

    What Congress needs is rules to prevent unrelated legislation from being added to fiscal bills.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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  7. #27
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    Oh my, I worked in the corporate counsel office of Pioneer Hi-Bred, Inc. in the early '80's. My biggest job duty was monitoring the use and misuse of their proprietary germplasm. This often involved sting operations against small farmers who were pirating protected seed varieties, usually wheat and soybeans, and suing or threatening to sue if they were caught. Didn't realize I was part of the "Mafia". I was also involved with negotiating the licensing agreement with Monsanto for use of their glyphosate resistant gene. Glyphosate resistant plants are probably the biggest GMO crops out there. I think the BT gene for insect resistance is the next largest. I knew some of the scientists and plant breeders who worked on that project also.

    Now if I understand some of you GMO and Monsanto haters out there, if anyone of you invented, say, a better mousetrap, its ok for you to patent it and make a zillion dollars from said mousetrap. Its also ok for you to sue anyone who rips off your design for said mousetrap and sells it. After all, you did all the work to design and develop it. But its not ok for Monsanto or any other ag-biotech company that spend millions, if not billions, to develop better crop varieties to protect those varieties so they can recoup their investment? Why, pray tell? Do you think they should just give away the results of their research for the betterment of mankind?

    Now for all of you folks who think GMO crops are the boogeyman, can you point to any scientific research that definately proves they are harmful? A documentary film or web site with a definate agenda doesn't count.

    Now if y'all want to pay big bucks for organically grown, non-GMO stuff, more power to you. I think the organic thing is mostly a marketing tool and vastly overated, but I do like my home grown eggs and I'm planting some heirloom tomatoes this spring out of curiosity. I buy fresh veggies from the local farmers' market. But remember, most of the world doesn't have that luxury when it comes to food. We need efficient, cost effective ways to produce large amounts of food crops in a manner that causes the least damage to the environment. GMO's help do this.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Dec. 31, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners;6923224


    We need efficient, cost effective ways to produce large amounts of food crops in a manner that causes the least damage to the environment. [B
    GMO's help do this[/B].
    I LOVE my Chickens!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    Oh my, I worked in the corporate counsel office of Pioneer Hi-Bred, Inc. in the early '80's. My biggest job duty was monitoring the use and misuse of their proprietary germplasm. This often involved sting operations against small farmers who were pirating protected seed varieties, usually wheat and soybeans, and suing or threatening to sue if they were caught. Didn't realize I was part of the "Mafia". I was also involved with negotiating the licensing agreement with Monsanto for use of their glyphosate resistant gene. Glyphosate resistant plants are probably the biggest GMO crops out there. I think the BT gene for insect resistance is the next largest. I knew some of the scientists and plant breeders who worked on that project also.

    Now if I understand some of you GMO and Monsanto haters out there, if anyone of you invented, say, a better mousetrap, its ok for you to patent it and make a zillion dollars from said mousetrap. Its also ok for you to sue anyone who rips off your design for said mousetrap and sells it. After all, you did all the work to design and develop it. But its not ok for Monsanto or any other ag-biotech company that spend millions, if not billions, to develop better crop varieties to protect those varieties so they can recoup their investment? Why, pray tell? Do you think they should just give away the results of their research for the betterment of mankind?

    Now for all of you folks who think GMO crops are the boogeyman, can you point to any scientific research that definately proves they are harmful? A documentary film or web site with a definate agenda doesn't count.

    Now if y'all want to pay big bucks for organically grown, non-GMO stuff, more power to you. I think the organic thing is mostly a marketing tool and vastly overated, but I do like my home grown eggs and I'm planting some heirloom tomatoes this spring out of curiosity. I buy fresh veggies from the local farmers' market. But remember, most of the world doesn't have that luxury when it comes to food. We need efficient, cost effective ways to produce large amounts of food crops in a manner that causes the least damage to the environment. GMO's help do this.
    You have the right to your opinion, and I respect your right and your opinion greatly. I however do greatly disagree with your comment with GMO has not been proven to be harmful. Have you seen any butterflies lately? How about lightning bugs? What about bees? Ah bees, when they are all dead, we will know how much we should have appreciated them. No bees= No food. And as far as damage to the invironment, apparently you have not seen what Monsanto did to the country of India. If people dont wake up and see what is happening it will happen here as well. We are headed in that direction.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    Oh my, I worked in the corporate counsel office of Pioneer Hi-Bred, Inc. in the early '80's. My biggest job duty was monitoring the use and misuse of their proprietary germplasm. This often involved sting operations against small farmers who were pirating protected seed varieties, usually wheat and soybeans, and suing or threatening to sue if they were caught. Didn't realize I was part of the "Mafia". I was also involved with negotiating the licensing agreement with Monsanto for use of their glyphosate resistant gene. Glyphosate resistant plants are probably the biggest GMO crops out there. I think the BT gene for insect resistance is the next largest. I knew some of the scientists and plant breeders who worked on that project also.

    Now if I understand some of you GMO and Monsanto haters out there, if anyone of you invented, say, a better mousetrap, its ok for you to patent it and make a zillion dollars from said mousetrap. Its also ok for you to sue anyone who rips off your design for said mousetrap and sells it. After all, you did all the work to design and develop it. But its not ok for Monsanto or any other ag-biotech company that spend millions, if not billions, to develop better crop varieties to protect those varieties so they can recoup their investment? Why, pray tell? Do you think they should just give away the results of their research for the betterment of mankind?

    Now for all of you folks who think GMO crops are the boogeyman, can you point to any scientific research that definately proves they are harmful? A documentary film or web site with a definate agenda doesn't count.

    Now if y'all want to pay big bucks for organically grown, non-GMO stuff, more power to you. I think the organic thing is mostly a marketing tool and vastly overated, but I do like my home grown eggs and I'm planting some heirloom tomatoes this spring out of curiosity. I buy fresh veggies from the local farmers' market. But remember, most of the world doesn't have that luxury when it comes to food. We need efficient, cost effective ways to produce large amounts of food crops in a manner that causes the least damage to the environment. GMO's help do this.
    agreed. If we went back to locally grown only, people would starve. Or they'd have to make a choice between eating or living indoors with heat & plumbing because there would not be as much food and prices would sky rocket.


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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    agreed. If we went back to locally grown only, people would starve. Or they'd have to make a choice between eating or living indoors with heat & plumbing because there would not be as much food and prices would sky rocket.
    Why do these discussions always go back to either Giant Agribusiness v. backyard farmer and we all starve? As if there is no other option.

    Not to mention Americans spend less on food than most countries, so we are unlikely to starve or have to stop heating our house. I know that *I* personally pay nearly $300/month on cable, internet and cell phones. Not exactly essential items in compared to, oh you know....good FOOD.



  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Why do these discussions always go back to either Giant Agribusiness v. backyard farmer and we all starve? As if there is no other option.

    Not to mention Americans spend less on food than most countries, so we are unlikely to starve or have to stop heating our house. I know that *I* personally pay nearly $300/month on cable, internet and cell phones. Not exactly essential items in compared to, oh you know....good FOOD.
    we spend less on food because so much can be grown because of the products Monsanto & other corporations developed. We spend less because of plant scientists like Norman Borlaug. We spend less because we can grow more for less. A small hobby, local farmer isn't going to be able to do that.


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  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    we spend less on food because so much can be grown because of the products Monsanto & other corporations developed. We spend less because of plant scientists like Norman Borlaug. We spend less because we can grow more for less. A small hobby, local farmer isn't going to be able to do that.
    Sorry, I should have said that differently: Americans spend a smaller portion of their income on food than other countries. Sure, it may be possible that it is because there are agricultural giants providing our food; but my point is that without super giant big agriculture "Americans will starve" is hard to imagine. Somehow the rest of the world survives without starving and spend more of their annual income on food.

    http://www.motherjones.com/blue-marb...-spending-less

    We probably spend more of our income on junk made in China than we do on food.



  14. #34
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Original question No ...

    GMO crops serve a purpose. Don't like them, don't buy them ...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jun. 4, 2002
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    My biggest beef with the GMO crops is that the genetics cannot be contained. If I grow organic corn and my neighbor grows GMO corn and it cross pollinates with my corn, it ruins my corn. It also can cause me to be accused of "stealing" the miserable GMO genes I did not want in the first place.

    Compare it to a stallion turned loose by someone that jumps your fences, breeds your mares, gets them in foal and then having someone demand that you pay them for the foals. It's an outrage. Monsanto should be paying you for having to deal with their mutant foals that were forced upon your good purebred mares.

    It's not like the neighbor can choose whether or not to have his crops contaminated by the GMO's or not...No setback requirements or anything are going to stop pollen being spread by insects or wind. If Monsanto can't control the spread of their patented life forms than they have NO business suing anyone who acquires them through no fault of their own.

    Before we all jump on the GMO's are harmless bandwagon, consider how many nations have totally banned them.

    A good book where one can read about the development of GMO organisms is the book "Seeds of Deception." It talks about the unintended consequences of inserting genes the way they do and uses the story of the L-Trypophan debacle where a company made L-Tryp. using some genetically modified bacteria that made the stuff. People ate it and got really really sick. Remember that? Anyway, what happened was the bacteria made L-Tryp well enough but it also made toxins as well...an unintended consequence that made people very ill and some lost their health completely. I can't recall if anyone died but there's a classic example of why many of us dislike or fear GMO's. Most of the GMOs have not had long term testing done before they were released. We are the guinea pigs and just take a look at fat, sick America right now and tell me something is not really off somewhere. Now, our lawmakers have signed a law making it impossible to sue the companies experimenting on us? And that doesn't bother some of you?


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  16. #36
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    As an agronomist, I work in the GMO seed research business. Just a few things to think about, from someone who works with GMO research daily:

    Organic foods are not suppose to be sprayed with "chemicals." In my world, these chemicals are called CPP's - Crop Protection Products. The key word here is PROTECTION. As a researcher and farmer myself (and a horse owner and competitor!) I know that I need to protect my plants, and therefore my yield (i.e. your food).

    How do I protect that bountiful harvest from the weeds that steal nutrients and cause stress? How do I protect the leaves from devastating chomping and chewing from bugs? Those nibbles open holes in the leaves, which let bacteria and fungus into my little plants. I have to protect the little guys - they can't do it themselves! And, I need to do it on a large scale. I have a say in the plants produced on over 300,000 acres.

    I can. not. find enough help to hand pick each rootworm, aphid, and stinkbug off those plants. I can. not. find enough help to hand weed every row. If I could find the help - I would charge you for it. I would charge you a lot. Because my labor bill would be outrageous!

    Now if you want to buy your vegetables from the local farmer, who did hand pick those bugs off and relocate them, go for it! He has a great business plan and a niche market. However, every season, I have to go diagnose problem organic fields that look really sad. Those poor plants have been under stress and have lesions and odd shaped seed heads and weird looking growths. Are those the guys you want to eat? No way! You want to pick out the best, healthy, strong looking ones when you go to the market.

    The other problem I see with organic farming - this is farming, not gardening - is the toll it can take on the soil. In many cases, since organic fields cannot have chemicals sprayed over the field, they cultivate and rip the soil to reduce the weeds between the row. What?!? What about no-till?!? "Save the soil! Just say 'no' to soil erosion!" For years and years, we have been taught to disturb the soil as little as possible. Wind erosion. Water erosion. Every time a soil particle is exposed, it is at risk! Cultivating is NOT a sustainable activity! It causes faster erosion, and less soil available for future generations to use to grow crops to feed your great-grandkids!

    So although you may buy unsustainable organic products, I feed the rest of the population. And I do it with GMO crops, because I can spray those crops - I can PROTECT those crops - by using herbicides that work WITH the plants, and eliminate their competition. I keep their stress levels down, your grocery bill down, and my yields up.

    I feed GMO corn to my livestock. My horses eat it and somehow still win at large pony shows you have all heard of. My cows eat it, birth normal healthy calves. I feed the meat from these animals, and GMO tomatoes and green beans and bananas to my family. If I had any hesitation coming from my own personal research in the field, in the lab, or on my plate, why would I continue to do it to myself and those I care about?

    I've worked with Monsanto on numerous projects. I have not been brainwashed or coerced in any way since I started. I like data and facts. And the fact is, people are healthier when they get quality, well rounded meals. A little of this and a little of that. Americans can have this variety because the food is affordable enough to buy more products. If you can afford to buy from the local guy, or pay more for organic stressed out spawn of sick plants, go for it. You are helping someone's economy. But please, do not try to limit what others get to choose to buy to feed their families.


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  17. #37
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    But non-GMO is not = organic.



  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    My biggest beef with the GMO crops is that the genetics cannot be contained. If I grow organic corn and my neighbor grows GMO corn and it cross pollinates with my corn, it ruins my corn. It also can cause me to be accused of "stealing" the miserable GMO genes I did not want in the first place.
    Hogwash!

    You will not be accused of stealing. The only people who get sued for improperly using the traits are those who SIGNED a legal agreement with Monsanto, saying that they agree to NOT plant the offspring of the seeds they purchased in a Monsanto bag.

    So, #1 - they signed a legal agreement to not do such activity. And #2 - you cannot plant the offspring for a very good reason. The second generation of seeds do not carry both parts of the gene. Only one. Therefore, only part of the gene is expressed. So if the little rootworm wiggles by and takes a bite, he is only going to get half of the dose he needs to get to perish.

    Ever heard "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger?"

    Mr. Rootworm now doesn't die, but instead becomes resistant. And guess what? His children are, too!

    Therefore eliminating the traits effectiveness and making the PATENT THE GROWER SIGNED AN AGREEMENT TO USE, worthless on the field. (Good news, though! Rootworms don't travel far.)

    And the other thing - if you are accused of "stealing" the trait through air and insect pollination, there's a DNA test for that! One quick little test can tell researchers like myself if the gene came from Mom or Pop! You're safe!


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  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post

    But non-GMO is not = organic.
    You are correct. But we are far more limited on the CPP's we can use on conventional plants. That is why GMO's were developed - to provide more options in the modes of action and rates we can use, by making the plant more hearty and flexible.

    There are no new chemistries in development for conventional crops (that I know of). It's not for a lack of trying. BELIEVE ME. (What do you think I do all day? Sit on COTH forums? Bah!)

    But if you use the same products over and over and over again, we will have much bigger problems. There are reasons GMO's were developed - at the request of the consumer. If the consumer didn't want something, no new items would ever come to market.
    Last edited by goldenrow; Apr. 4, 2013 at 02:43 PM. Reason: Spelling.


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  20. #40
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    Don't get your information from "Movies" "Food Inc" "; "Gasland"; etc. It's like watching Popeye cartoons and deciding to eat spinach for strength.

    Yes... Those movies are the same as cartoons... Fiction from someone trying to make money. It's entertainment or advocacy not something to bet your life on.


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