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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    594

    Default decluttering

    I was doing wonderful, got rid of a couple saddles, a saddle stand a dresser. Etc. And the palce looked great. Two weeks later, looks like a bomb went off, stuff everywhere!
    I'm suspecting it is me . So you must all hold my hand and support me as I jettison the rest of my crap. Smile


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
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    32,529

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lin View Post
    I was doing wonderful, got rid of a couple saddles, a saddle stand a dresser. Etc. And the palce looked great. Two weeks later, looks like a bomb went off, stuff everywhere!
    I'm suspecting it is me . So you must all hold my hand and support me as I jettison the rest of my crap. Smile
    www.flylady.net

    you are never behind.

    Currently I am (suppose to anyhow) clearing some stuff out, since the boy scouts have a yard sale to raise funds for the summer camp...got only 2 weeks....

    If you are in my area, we accept donations !
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    594

    Default

    Even when it seems simple it is not



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lin View Post
    Even when it seems simple it is not
    it IS simple.

    Just not always easy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,397

    Default

    I lived in a cluttered house for quite a while and now I live in a sparse house after moving about a year ago. I just keep cutting into it; what can go, what's not necessary. It's astounding how much crap people bring into their homes! You have to be brutal, cut deep!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    594

    Default

    My problem is mixed feelings. Bwhile I hate clutter (beyond boring). I. Do see the historical aspect



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,480

    Default

    At some point all that history has to be sorted by someone. We just gutted my FIL's house. There was so much 'crap' that was once just precious to someone. But when that someone is long gone, and no one knows why it's precious, or what in the world to do with it...out it goes. Leaving that sort of stuff for someone else to be stressed by and guilty about- So not cool .


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  8. #8

    Default

    I'm currently purging clothes. Anything decent is going to freecycle or the church clothing drive. Barn clothes beyond redemption will be turned into rags.

    I've lost 90 lbs. Some things I'm having a hard time letting go of because of the fear of gaining it back. Some things I'm shocked that I'm emotionally attached to. Some of the nicer things I'm going to see if they can be altered. If not, they are gone.

    Going to try to sell some of my ball gowns - prom season is upon us!
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lin View Post
    My problem is mixed feelings. Bwhile I hate clutter (beyond boring). I. Do see the historical aspect
    If it's truly historical, pass it along to somebody who will cherish it.
    Private person or museum, etc.

    anything past that:
    if you have not seen it in a year and not missed it, it can go
    if you don't love it, send it along.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,878

    Default

    My motto you can't take it with you. If you have not looked at it, or thought about it in 6 months, or even forgotten you have it you do not need it.
    But I am a practicing minimalist!
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    13,092

    Default

    I threw out, gave away, and unloaded a good deal of my things a couple of years ago when I moved. With the exception of things that truly meant a great deal (my books, photos, and little bit of art. My grandmother's tea pots, among some other things) or were things of comfort or that I used with great regularity (bedding, clothes, a few pieces of furniture), it all went. It all felt very toxic to me and I was tired of hauling it around.

    When I moved into this house about 18 months ago, I had to start over with a lot of things (I had shared a furnished house with a friend in between the great purge and this house). My little house is now almost completely full of things I love. With a few minor exceptions (which will be replaced next month!), I am surrounded by things I love and/or need AND use.

    I need to purge clothes...that's always very satisfying.

    My mom has taught all of us to not hoard clutter. Between helping clear out grandparents' houses and then having to empty her own ruined house of both her things and our father's (who was a clutterbug, too!), she has become borderline militant about clutter! She feels that if you don't absolutely love it, have worn it or used it or looked at it in 6 months to a year (unless it is one of those things you need, but occasionally), then it doesn't need to be in your space. If someone gives you a gift you do not like or use, you don't need to keep it and worrying about the giver's feelings is not necessary (it was a GIFT for you to do with as you please!). Heirlooms are great if you love them, but pass them along if you don't.

    It is a nice way to live. I'm not super great with daily clutter (books, magazines, mail, clothes), but I have very little stuff that I just don't need (which is important in my tiny house with very little storage). I have gotten better about keeping up on the daily stuff- 10 or 15 minutes every day or every other day to pick up, stow away, throw out, etc, makes a big difference.

    Purging is good for you!!! Once you do it a few times, you'll really start to enjoy the feeling of freedom!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,774

    Default

    Set a timer, have two sets of garbage bags (in two colors), one set of bags is for garbage, the other set is for rehome or sell stuff, and empty the entire closet or whatever it is, then only put back what you like, what fits, what you have a real attachment to, and get rid of the rest. Take the full bags out one at a time, so you don't end up with a big pile. For giveaways put a sign on it, and call for pickup (many charities have a pickup service), for the garbage get rid of it as fast as possible, even if you have to find someone on Craigslist with a truck, or pay the kid next door to load his pickup and haul to the nearest dump station. With excess furniture either move it to the garage, and have a sale or get rid of as fast as possible. Keeping stuff isn't just clutter, but something you have to store, move, and maintain. The great thing about getting rid of clutter is that you have more room to move around, less to clean, and it's just not sitting there getting dusty. A big chunk of stuff to get rid of is the stuff others have given you that you don't want, or things you're storing for others. Give a deadline for pickup, and then get rid of it (a friend's husband stored a buddy's furniture and stuff in their garage for years-when they contacted the buddy when she said it goes now, the man had forgotten he even left it and didn't want it).

    A great place to start is the kitchen. I took the plastic storage stuff out, matched lids to dish, and trashed the rest, plus sizes I never used. I also took all of the cookware out, and rehomed stuff I never used, or in sizes I didn't need-I made some friends very happy, and my cabinets are now organized. Go through the pantry and get rid of stuff that's outdated, you don't even remember why you have it, and with good stuff you don't want give it to a food pantry or other charity. I know I had oven stuff I never used, and found other homes for it. If you empty the garage, and only put back what you need, you'll find lots of stuff that's useless, broken, or you never use, and you might even be able to park in there.

    You can do this, but don't try to do everything at once, but in manageable sections.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    594

    Default

    I am re inspired. Thank you all.
    And it has amazed me what people will buy.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,747

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    I am not the most enthusiastic cleaner so my house stays livable BECAUSE there is not too much stuff to make a mess with. If I had tons of stuff, ye gawds.

    Sometimes rather than putting something back or finding a place to put it I think, "Do I REALLY care this much?" and I just stick it on the good will pile. My nearly empty guest bedroom was storing a few little things of clothes and finally rather than buying/assembling a shelving unit and sorting them I just got rid of them. Problem solved.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    I have not been one to keep clutter. My husband can get stuff very cluttery. I keep things tossed out.

    This will sound bad: when my dad died last summer, he had some stuff, or rather clutter, but it was neat clutter and arranged nicely so it didn't appear as clutter. But still it was clutter/junk.

    We cleaned out his house and you know, all those nonsense doo dads, and clutter, we tossed into the trash. It was not worth anything to anybody and that is where it went. Who needs a back scratcher, or like a statue which said something not so nice on it which was bought in the 70's. Into the trash, and recycle - what we could recycle. He had at least 50 bottles of various booze bottles, most were opened, some had just a little bit, some were full but not new (he was not an alcoholic or drinker he kept for visitors) in his garage, in FL, where the temps could get really high in there with his big car in his little garage. IOW the booze was spoiled due to heat. He had given us some Bailey's one time and it was totally curdled, and separated. ICK. No clue how long it had been in the garage. But nevertheless I emptied what I could and tossed the bottles in the recycle. OMG it smelled awful. He had all kinds of clutter worth nothing and it ended up in the trash, or to the Wharf Rescue. We took whatever was useable to us or our family/friends. Like pots pans, some towels, etc. He was also a smoker, so stuff did stink. He had canned goods some were a decade old.

    So think about your clutter. Toss and get it cleaned up and be consistent. Those little treasures to you may be somebody else's trash.

    He had some sports memorabilia for a state he didn't live in and most of it got trashed. Doo dads bought for him by relatives at a thrift / junk type store. I did take some vivid blue hand towels with a college logo on them and they are now horse towels. To do a garage sale was not in the cards for us to do. We did give things to the neighbors if they wanted anything. His house is sold, and now somebody else lives there. Whole sad ordeal, but it was a task to go through all that stuff.

    I have a friend who has stuff everywhere, and there is not much there worth any value to anybody. Yes, of course, one man's junk is another man's treasure. Ok, go with that then if you will.

    I keep up on our clutter. I (since my husband can't or won't) declutter once a week. We both have recently gone through each room over the past year and tossed stuff. If you do not use it in a year, get rid of it.

    If you do not care who goes through your stuff, or you still like keeping stuff, then go with it and continue. This is a different point of view. Maybe you don't care since you will be dead, have to move, or whatever, so then keep your stuff and clutter.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,092

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    This will sound bad: when my dad died last summer, he had some stuff, or rather clutter, but it was neat clutter and arranged nicely so it didn't appear as clutter. But still it was clutter/junk.
    This was my dad, too. He was very, very neat and tidy. A little OCD, probably, but he saved a lot of stuff and had "collections" of all sorts of things. Neat piles of things does not mean you don't have clutter....it just means you have neat clutter!

    Because my parents' house was trashed in a hurricane (same day Dad died...though, unrelated to the hurricane. Just epically bad timing!), it made de-cluttering that house easy. A lot of things were trashed due to water damage, mold, and humidity (amazingly, ALL our family pictures were saved. They were within feet of the worst damage, stacked on the piano bench in the living room where my mom and dad had been organizing them, but did not get wet and we were able to grab them and get them out in quick order).

    Still, a sad process....a lot of his favorite things, while endearing, just weren't things we wanted to keep.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    I do a big declutter every 6 months.

    I take what I think I don't need and box it up. If I haven't opened the box in 6 months it goes to Goodwill. Once that box is gone, I start all over again.
    "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,397

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    Curb Appeal, I do that too. I saved a lot of our moving boxes and will box up "crap" (my umbrella term for nearly everything we own) and if I can't tell you what's in it or I haven't opened it for a few months I just toss it.

    Sometimes the secret is not to LOOK at it! That emotional trigger will pop back up and you'll keep it!


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,774

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    I read a hint a long time ago, and it works for me. When you change clothes out for the season, it is a great time to take all of the winter stuff, go through it, whatever you never used goes. Put the winter stuff away, then do the same with the summer items before hanging them up or putting them on shelves. That way you don't spend your time storing, and putting up with stuff you never use.

    Before you get ready to sell the house, empty the closets of anything you aren't currently using, and make sure the closets look roomy. I also bought the skinny, velvet covered hangers (I bought mine at Bed Bath and Beyond, but someone on here bought a bunch at Macy's with a coupon), I get the regular hangers with the closed bottom, and not the shirt hangers. Nothing slides off of the hangers, they save a lot of space, and if you get the same color it adds a nice finished look to the closet too.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Curb Appeal View Post
    I do a big declutter every 6 months.

    I take what I think I don't need and box it up. If I haven't opened the box in 6 months it goes to Goodwill. Once that box is gone, I start all over again.
    -awestruck- you rock. i consider myself doing well if i can pick a category (books; CD's; vinyl; clothes) and do a purge once every couple of *years*.

    my mother is cleaning out her house preparatory to moving down here; she's tossing stuff right and left. in fact, i think she's tossing *too* much, but well, it's her stuff...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique


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