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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,464

    Default How long do you need to ice legs?

    If you are icing as a preventative measure how long should you ice?

    I'm casually thinking about getting ice boots for up front and hock boots for the back to ice after every ride. I am insanely slow moving so it would be no extra effort to put them on after I hose her off and let her hang out for 15-20 minutes while I clean up, launder linens, shoot the breeze, etc. Would that be a long enough time to be helpful?

    I know that icing after every ride is unnecessary but I enjoy feeling like I am pampering her and at her age with all of her wear and tear it couldn't hurt.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Posts
    748

    Default

    Anything from 10 to 20 min is good. More than that and you can be making damage, less and it's not doing anything.

    It's actually a great idea and I commend you for making the extra effort for your horse.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    5,926

    Default

    I have Ice Horse Evendura boots, and ice for 20 minutes after a hard workout (horse is working on a move up to I-2 at 16).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    16,194

    Default

    I do 20 minutes. The gel packs in my ice boots and pretty much thawed by then.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    594

    Default

    I do the same (except in winter when it seems mean to ice) and leave them on about 15-20 minutes.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Area VI
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    Our 'standard' procedure is 30 minutes on the Game Ready at medium pressure. Since my horse is rather impatient, he usually gets 20 minutes unless he's being cooperative.

    If I just use the ice cells and SMB's, I leave them on for roughly the same amount of time since the ice cells thaw fairly quickly...I think after about 20 minutes, but I'm usually doing something else.

    I didn't have much luck with the boots that have ice pockets...they were heavy and kept slipping. Granted they were being used on a 4yo that wasn't too thrilled, but they were kind of a pain in the @ss.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
    Posts
    968

    Default

    According to the lameness vet we use (who also teaches at a vet college) studies have shown it takes 15 minutes for the cold to penetrate the first layers of the skin so when treating something by ice or cold hosing the first 15 minutes don't count then you start the clock for 15-20 minutes or more..


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,464

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback. Islgrl that is really interesting. So that vet would be a proponent of icing for 30-40 minutes since it takes 15 minutes to penetrate the top layer of skin?


    Does anyone have recommendations for economical ice boots? The ones with the refreezable cells seems most feasible day in and day out since I don't see myself remembering to run by the gas station and buying ice on the way out to the barn each day.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Posts
    61

    Default

    I have herd 15-20 mins at most... after 20 mins the blood vessels and body start sensing there is lack of circulation to the area and rush blood back to it. which isn't nessecarily a bad thing... since it might out the unflammation out and bring back new blood to heal anything that needs healed.

    I also heard that cold hosing...unless you have very very very cold water ( most of us don't, even with deep wells and such) you won't get into the tissue very deep and icing is the only way to penetrate.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Posts
    61

    Default

    I have heard 15-20 mins at most... after 20 mins the blood vessels and body start sensing there is lack of circulation to the area and rush blood back to it. which isn't necessarily a bad thing... since it might out the inflammation out and bring back new blood to heal anything that needs healed.

    I also heard that cold hosing...unless you have very very very cold water ( most of us don't, even with deep wells and such) you won't get into the tissue very deep and icing is the only way to penetrate.


    What Islgirl said also makes sense to me if you cold water hosing. if you wet the leg down beforehand it penetrates faster as the aire trapped in the air don't have to be warmed up and you get a better connection to the leg.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2002
    Location
    RHE, CA US
    Posts
    2,160

    Default

    I was told 20-30 minutes by my vet,but that was for rehabbing a bowed tendon. I iced a lot, and what I found was you have to wet the leg to get it any kind of cold before your ice melts. If you hose her off then put on the ice, that is the best way to get the legs cold, and you may only need to leave the ice on for 20 minutes. Be sure to check the legs because you don't want to leave them on too long.

    I used the ice horse brand wraps, which are good for being by yourself and putting ice on the legs. If I had help, I could use a polo wrap and get ice to stay on just as well. Most of the time though I was alone so the ice horse boots were easier to apply. However, if I used them as directed the leg never really got that cold (even wetting the leg first). I had to use my own ice bags, NOT in the inserts of the ice horse boots to get the leg cold. So really, I think you could find a huge pair of splint boots that could work just as well to hold the ice on the leg, at a cheaper price.

    I made my own ice bags, by using a gallon ziploc freezer bag (you need the heavy ones) filling it with crushed ice and water. I found adding water to the bag made it colder and easier to form to the leg. I also made my own ice packs by taking 5-6 cups of water and 1 cup of rubbing alcohol and freezing it. By the time I got to the barn, I could crush it with my foot easily and it would form around his leg just like an expensive ice pack. I had to replace the bags frequently but it was worth it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Area VI
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GraceLikeRain View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. Islgrl that is really interesting. So that vet would be a proponent of icing for 30-40 minutes since it takes 15 minutes to penetrate the top layer of skin?


    Does anyone have recommendations for economical ice boots? The ones with the refreezable cells seems most feasible day in and day out since I don't see myself remembering to run by the gas station and buying ice on the way out to the barn each day.
    I love the ice cells by Prof. Choice! We use them on horses who won't stand for the Game Ready since we really don't want the $6000 machine being kicked by an impatient baby.

    The downside is they don't stay cold longer than 20-25 minutes, even when frozen solid. They do make ice boots that hold crushed ice, and we like those as well. Real ice stays colder longer.



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