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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,876

    Default Hoof Grid, Eco-Grid, etc.

    Anyone used this or a similar product on the farm for mud control?
    www.hoofgrid.com

    We have a mud issue right around two pasture gates that needs fixing asap.
    https://www.facebook.com/HunterHillFarmIowa

    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2013
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    683

    Default

    I've been eyeing it but have other farm projects at the top of my list. (new farm) I went to the local TSC/Co-op and got equine pine pellets for a quick short term fix in my sacrifice lot around the run in shed. Trying to keep the mud down... and it's worked so far. I fluff the pellets daily and keep manure off them but it's managed to keep from creating a complete mud pit, and we've had alot of rain lately...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,929

    Default

    I have the hoof grid in my paddocks. Well, one paddock plus half of another...only had that much cash at the time! They do well for my place, but these were dedicated "dry" paddocks, where we laid the grids over 5/8" gravel and filled/covered with pea gravel. If I had the money, I'd put grids all over my place!

    I had photos of our paddocks before, during, and after installation on webshots, but now that's gone, I really should put them elsewhere.

    We did hoof grid because we had a dealer close and that made pricing better, but there are a few different ones around. Another poster here sells one of the other brands and has done more with gates/pastures like you are asking about, so hopefully they will post. Name escapes me at the moment...both of te poster and the product!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,876

    Default

    Thanks. Hoping to find a few options and price points. I have no clue what the stuff costs.
    https://www.facebook.com/HunterHillFarmIowa

    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,257

    Default

    Former BO had it in the stalls - she said it was OK, but did have one horse (who was on stall rest) paw it up... I still like the looks of it for stalls, but, as Southern Yankee says, it's not at the top of my barn projects list.

    That said, I have a rubber ring mat at the doorway of a stall which opens into my night pen and it's been great! I think I've posted about it before, but I pretty much just tossed it down (didn't really level it, just made certain that it didn't keep the door from swinging open). Within a couple of months (at most), the grass had started growing through it, and it's done a great job of stabilizing the ground there (I'ts been in use for for a little over a year now). The lady I bought it from (Jeanne at Emge Equine Services: http://www.earthhorse.com/stableflooring.htm - the "Winners Circle Heavy Duty Ring Mat") told me that she's used them around gates, and water troughs as well. I've been really happy with the one that I got, and am definitely going to buy more. (It's not in the cards right now, but I also think they'd make a very nice base in the run-in...)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,929

    Default

    A cheaper option for gates might be to just dig out the muck, lay geotextile fabric and then rock. At a previous barn here in the rainy NW, they did this and it worked well and lasted a long time.

    The grids that we used, if I recall correctly, ran about $1/sq ft for the grids themselves. And these were the "cheaper" ones -- they have heavy duty ones too that you would need if frost heave is a problem, or if the underlay isn't that great. We had a level, packed rock layer already so we could use the regular, not heavy duty, version.

    If a horse was able to paw them up, they were not installed correctly.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,456

    Default

    I use a version of this called Stable Grid in my stalls and field entrances. It works very well and has done so for 10 years now.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,876

    Default

    I see farmtek offers a ring mat as well. They're more expensive than stall mats
    https://www.facebook.com/HunterHillFarmIowa

    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,115

    Default

    Maybe a search for products for ground stabilization would find other dealers. I know that in sandy places with traffic, they lay this kind of grid work, so tires can't turn the pathway into a sand pit. Finding a more local dealer could save you in shipping or purchase price, because it is not HORSE related!

    Landscape folks might be helpful too, knowing what products are available for these kind of issues. Call and ask them!

    Rubber mats help for a quick fix, then when the weather dries you can clean out the mess and do what you need to fix the problem. PLUS the mat can then be used elsewhere. We did the geotextile fabric and stone at our gates, has worked very well. But every area is different, so options are good in choosing.

    Dumping bedding or wood pellets is a short term fix for wet spots, will probably create an even WORSE mess with time. The organic stuff in those stays wet, is FOREVER breaking down, so you end up with muck slime that doesn't dry until August. You do have to clean that slime mess down to firm ground, before you can do any kind of improving the gate area.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Ecoraster product for mud control

    Hi Sparky Boy,

    Our product Ecoraster has been solving these kind of mud issues for 20 years. www.purus-northamerica.com




    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky Boy View Post
    Anyone used this or a similar product on the farm for mud control?
    www.hoofgrid.com

    We have a mud issue right around two pasture gates that needs fixing asap.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2005
    Location
    best place so far
    Posts
    1,145

    Default

    In my gate entrances I put crush and run and then pea gravel over that. Has held up for almost 6 years now with no problems.

    I did a "version" of this grid work in my run-in shelters based on a recommendation from a friend. I used pressure treated 2X4s, placed them on their short sides with spacers in between. Looked similar to a teak shower floor

    http://teakshowermat.weebly.com/the-...hower-mat.html

    then filled back in with screenings to fill the spaces.

    This has worked SUPER in my run-in, was easy to install and the horses cannot wear through it.
    Read about my time at the Hannoveraner Verband Breeders Courses:
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2011.html
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2012.html


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky Boy View Post
    I see farmtek offers a ring mat as well. They're more expensive than stall mats
    Yeah - that's why I'm only planning to use them in smaller areas (doorways, etc.), though I do like the idea that I could always pull them up and reuse them elsewhere.

    They totally fit the "Project Management Triangle" concept:
    Fast, Good, Cheap - you pick which two you want.
    (I try to keep that in mind for all of my barn projects!)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    When I lived in GA I had a 2 stall barn that I used a 1 piece grid system for the stalls. It came in a big roll, whatever size you wanted to order, and right now I can't remember the brand (but I think it shipped from Missouri?) The way you installed it there was NO WAY it would come up. It was fantastic, although you definitely wanted to bed well, as I still thought it was slippery. That's why I would not use that particular brand outdoors.

    Now I've got 4 stalls, so for the same price I went for Stall Skins. There's pros & cons of both.

    For muddy areas outside around entry ways to the run-in and around gates I currently use a grid rubber mat from Lowe's. I piece them together, by the time all the screenings and such are under/on them and the area is stabilized it becomes a pad. It would be better to use a specific and more rigid product like what I used to have rather than the mats from Lowe's, but it's way cheaper to use the rubber mats now that I've figured out how to make them work for me. And I seriously love not having to slush through mud to walk around!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2004
    Posts
    288

    Default

    I saw a bagged gravel dust looking product at the horse expo. I cant remember what it was called. It was marketed as permanent mud fix. Put down like bluedust but was different somehow. They said to do a gate area took about 15 bags and the bags were on sale for 10 instead of 14. I wondered what it was - I'm sure it can be had by the truckload.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slantedhorse View Post
    I saw a bagged gravel dust looking product at the horse expo. I cant remember what it was called. It was marketed as permanent mud fix. Put down like bluedust but was different somehow. They said to do a gate area took about 15 bags and the bags were on sale for 10 instead of 14. I wondered what it was - I'm sure it can be had by the truckload.
    Was it this stuff, slantedhorse? http://www.mudstopper.com/index.htm
    Don't know a thing about it, but I saw it in a booth, too...



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