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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,660

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    That oak fencing is awesome, unfortunately I am in an area where that would be crazy expensive (I don't even think it is available). I priced oak boards once and it was like buying finished tall trim for your house. I love the look of an oak fence.

    I think it comes down to what is available to you and asethetics and safety. No one has thrown out continuous metal fence, but that would be another option. That's what the boarding barns around here use when the pens share a fence line because although it is expensive to put up, it is pretty industructible and you don't need to mess with electric. It is also not going to give if the horse impacts it.

    For safety and not having to paint, my vote is the Ramm or Centaur flex boards. You just have to be willing to tighten it. There is an Arabian show barn here that keeps it tight and has had it for many years (I can't even remember when the got it--it was a long time ago) and it still looks fantastic (black). There is a half mile of PVC (white) coming into town and it looks dusty and dirty the day after they power wash it or 364 days a year. They kept the barb wire up on the inside--I imagine to protect it (cows). So if you are on a gravel road (this is highway, so I'm not sure what the deal is) that is something to consider when thinking about black, white, or brown. In some areas of the country white will grow mildew too.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

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    I have not ever had to tighten my Ramm flex fence, but I installed it in springtime and my corner posts are very very solid.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
    Posts
    65

    Default

    wow.. seems to just be a personal decision. I do have some questions about the Ramm or Canteur fence...
    What happens when a horse tries to bust thru it.. I understand it gives, but with tension wires inside, surely there will be injury- though perhaps not punctures, but injuries none the less... I am concerned that a horse could get tangled in it and be down for the count... at least with wood or vinyl, a horse could make it out to the other side-- not tangled in "wire"... perhaps also with injury-
    SO this is where I am SO confused as to what is "best"
    any comments/thoughts on that ?



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,820

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    If you do go with vinyl remember that all brands are NOT equal. We found that Ultraguard was heavier and cheaper than the locally available stuff. We got ours from Allhorsefence.com
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2004
    Posts
    288

    Default Ramm. Centaur.

    I'm doing flex fence. No more painting.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2007
    Location
    Bawston
    Posts
    160

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    Quote Originally Posted by gumtree View Post
    IMO it comes down to esthetics verses utilitarian along with area specific costs and budget. I prefer 3 or 4 board oak. I don’t like the look of vinyl it never develops any character. In high humidity/wet areas with low sun it does and will develop a greenish tinge. Regardless of installation and type I have not seen it be maintenance free especially with more then a pet horse or two. When a rail needs replacing the color difference sticks out like a sore thumb. Just like siding. It is not that easy to install. And looks crappy when the post shift which all post will do over time.
    Centour or Ramm if you are going synthetic/plastic would be a far better choice IMO. But I am an esthetics person and it looks way too utilitarian for my taste. I have very little direct experience with it and would never have either on my farm. But I have driven by plenty of farms with it and I would not say it is maintenance free. But if you can live with sagging in places and color shifts to each their own.
    Wood is my choice. But only oak. Pine or hemlock is a PIA. And I would avoid pressure treated post if you can get Locust or oak. There is a big difference in price and the cost of installation. A quick check of material costs I found that Centaur HTP 5 inch 3 “rail” will cost around $54 per 10 foot panel with posts plus the cost of installation which is far more time consuming then wood.
    In my area of SE PA 3 board oak slip board with locust posts, $36.50 and very easy to install. No nailing. I have not found it to require much maintenance and considering the cost difference and the ease of replacing a broken or bad board it more then makes up for the little time I may have to invest in keeping looking good. IMO based on a life time of using board fencing with little to no injuries the superior safety factor of plastic is a non starter but makes for good advertising.
    The following are some pictures of a slip board oak fence.
    http://s1136.photobucket.com/user/gu...tml?sort=3&o=2
    http://s1136.photobucket.com/user/gu...tml?sort=3&o=1
    http://s1136.photobucket.com/user/gu...tml?sort=3&o=0
    Hot diggity dog. Who did that for you?looks beautiful



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tchuki513 View Post
    wow.. seems to just be a personal decision. I do have some questions about the Ramm or Canteur fence...
    What happens when a horse tries to bust thru it.. I understand it gives, but with tension wires inside, surely there will be injury- though perhaps not punctures, but injuries none the less... I am concerned that a horse could get tangled in it and be down for the count... at least with wood or vinyl, a horse could make it out to the other side-- not tangled in "wire"... perhaps also with injury-
    SO this is where I am SO confused as to what is "best"
    any comments/thoughts on that ?
    I have not heard of a horse being injured along the lines you describe. The vinyl in the fence makes it fairly slippery, and it has bounce and a great deal of flexibility to it under stress. The horse might squeak over or under a rail but I cannot imagine it going through the rail as you describe and breaking the vinyl and exposing the wire, and then causing an injury.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
    Posts
    65

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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I have not heard of a horse being injured along the lines you describe. The vinyl in the fence makes it fairly slippery, and it has bounce and a great deal of flexibility to it under stress. The horse might squeak over or under a rail but I cannot imagine it going through the rail as you describe and breaking the vinyl and exposing the wire, and then causing an injury.
    Not that the wires become exposed, but due to the "stretch/give" the "fence board" could tangle around a leg or something... I am not sure- I am just trying to think of all the crazy accidents that are possible and was wondering if *this* nightmare could be reality.???..?



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,660

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    Quote Originally Posted by tchuki513 View Post
    Not that the wires become exposed, but due to the "stretch/give" the "fence board" could tangle around a leg or something... I am not sure- I am just trying to think of all the crazy accidents that are possible and was wondering if *this* nightmare could be reality.???..?
    They are tight and not *that* flexible. I cannot imagine how a horse could get the wide rail around a leg and get it tight if it is in good condition and tensioned. Assuming you mean the rails. I think the biggest danger would be a horse ramming into a post and busting it. Nice installation pics here: http://www.dennisfence.com/index.html

    Much different than a rope-type tensioned fence.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tchuki513 View Post
    Not that the wires become exposed, but due to the "stretch/give" the "fence board" could tangle around a leg or something... I am not sure- I am just trying to think of all the crazy accidents that are possible and was wondering if *this* nightmare could be reality.???..?
    It's really way too stiff to do anything like that. You have to significant force on it to bend it in the vertical plane, and keep the force on to keep it bent.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2013
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    688

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    I'm putting up fence now and went with the coated wire from Centaur, 4 strands of electric. Other parts of the farm came with Ramm flex rail already installed. I've have 15+ years of experience with Ramm flex rail and have never had a fence related injury. My parents are actually in the process of re-fencing their farm and are taking down the Ramm flex rail because they are tired of cleaning it, white will mildew. I’m taking their 15 year old fence and will be putting it up on my farm, that’s how well it’s aged. As far as safety goes think rubber band, if they hit it they bounce back. The real danger is them hitting a post or something else solid. I expect the same results out of the coated wire. I looked very closely at Electrobraid and chose the Centaur coated wire because of its rigidity, I didn't want my new baby hitting it and getting wrapped up in rope.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,217

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    My gelding galloped flat out into a new four strand coated high tensile fence. He bounced off of it, none the worse for wear (it was a new cross fence and he simply looked past it) BOINK. no harm, no foul.

    IF I were using it in separating paddocks with a single fence line, it better be the Hot Cote style or you must run some hot tape, wire, something...just like ANY shared fenceline, they will ruin it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tchuki513 View Post
    wow.. seems to just be a personal decision. I do have some questions about the Ramm or Canteur fence...
    What happens when a horse tries to bust thru it.. I understand it gives, but with tension wires inside, surely there will be injury- though perhaps not punctures, but injuries none the less... I am concerned that a horse could get tangled in it and be down for the count... at least with wood or vinyl, a horse could make it out to the other side-- not tangled in "wire"... perhaps also with injury-
    SO this is where I am SO confused as to what is "best"
    any comments/thoughts on that ?

    Have you ever picked a splinter out of your hand from a treated board? Ouch.
    Now gallop Bessie through a 10 year old oak board and watch it shatter and sliver. No thanks. It's pretty, but no fence is perfect.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,781

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    All plastic fencing, to me, looks like..............plastic.

    I like wood. Some of our pressure treated fencing has been up since 1980 and is still fine. This is the only photo I could find of our perimeter fencing. It's 4 board, treated 2x6s on 4x4 posts, with #9 aluminum hot wire on top. I was a bit lazy, and decided on this because I could get any building supplier to set a bundle of each on the my trailer. It went right from the trailer into the fenceline, and any boards I didn't like just got tossed to the center of the trailer and returned.

    The only thing I would do differently now is use "star drive" screws, which weren't available when I built the fences.

    http://www.starbornhavanese.com/images/DSCN0916.JPG

    Those Leyland Cypress trees are 40' tall now blocking the view of that house (can still see the lake), and the pony doesn't have any dapples anymore. The fence still looks fine, and I haven't touched it since the day we built it.



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