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  1. #1
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    Mar. 19, 2011
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    Question If you were buying a farm?

    Would a driveway needing work be a huge turnoff for you? We are getting ready to sell and it needs to be re paved however is over 1,200 feet long. I have several guys coming to quote it this week and am dreading the outcome, it's currently paved but very very bumpy! DH says we will just negotiate it in the sale, I say it's the first and last thing people remember and it may be on my must do list..... Would it depend on the price of the property or a must have before you'd consider it?



  2. #2
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    Jul. 4, 2008
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    We are actually looking at properties right now. How does the rest of the house look? If that's the only big thing that needed to be fixed and the replacement price was factored into a reduced house cost then it wouldn't bother us. If there were a lot of things that needed fixing, and it was listed as a fixer upper then we'd probably pass. It really depends on price for us though. It might be something we could live with too.
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  3. #3
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    Mar. 19, 2011
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    Thanks, the house was totally gutted three years ago, so other than perhaps paint to change colors there is nothing that needs doing. :-)



  4. #4
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    Mar. 24, 2009
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    People do not give credence to the thought that something is priced accordingly to what repairs may need to be done. They take whatever price that is there and have the subtract the $$$ for improvements needed to be done mindset.

    So best to set a price then give them credit for the repairs vs let them just have a field day with lowballing you.


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  5. #5
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    How big is the place and who is your market?

    What does your real estate agent say?

    If you're going to be dealing with the yuppie/whiners types that populate HGTV then fix the drive. If you're going to be dealing with a more realistic buyer (who's not afraid of a bump or two, or maybe some dirt, etc.) then leave it be for the next owner.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  6. #6
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    Ask your realtor. Will the cost of repaving 1200' of drive be regained in the selling price? Make your decision based on the answer. You might get the suggested selling price before your drive paving question though ! Proper timing makes for a better answer.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 20, 2011
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    Dutchess county, NY
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    We presently have a farm we are working to get under contract. One of the barns needs some structural work. We are planning on staying at the farm forever and want a forever type of repair. The sellers would likely get an economical fix.

    So our thoughts as a buyer is that we would negotiate the excepted offer and do the repair ourselves.


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    24,479

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    Agree with Babecakes...either do the repair/replacement yourself before marketing or get 2 or more quotes for the work in writing and then price the property for the market and offer $_____ back at closing for the driveway condition. If you're listing, make your Realtor aware so they make showing agents aware. That way they don't have to offer to find out the cost will be refunded at closing.

    But also be aware that it's also very common for buyers to want credit at closing for closing costs too.

    When getting repair quotes, ask contractors if there are other, less expensive options for sprucing up the driveway too.
    You jump in the saddle,
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  9. #9
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by cothhalter View Post
    Thanks, the house was totally gutted three years ago, so other than perhaps paint to change colors there is nothing that needs doing. :-)
    with this in mind this property would not be looked upon as a project... I would repair the drive so that it would reflect the quality of the other work.

    As others have said you may not recover the cost but having it repaired may very well be the key to being on the market a shorter time period.

    We sold a small estate in bad times mainly because we planted a veg garden... our idea was to put into the buyer's mind the place could be home.
    Property was on the market under 14 days with several full price contracts offered.


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  10. #10
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    Nov. 1, 1999
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    Shangri-LA
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    If you have a high dollar property, replace the driveway, if not I would say leave it as is and give a credit to the buyer if they ask. Unless it will definitely add value I would say no and see how it goes. If lookers are complaining about the bumpy driveway then fix it.



  11. #11
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    I bought a farm with a lovely house but plenty of cracks in the driveway (is your problem really rough or just not great?). Our driveway is at least as long as yours. While my city-bred husband did note the cracks, it did not matter one iota in our purchase decision and we have not fixed it. It is about 100th on my list of farm improvements to make as it WORKS, it's just not lovely to look at.

    We passed on a slightly smaller, 40 years younger house with a pristine driveway (and everything else) for around the same price because we liked the architecture and layout of the farm we bought.

    Do HGTV types buy farms? Not sure. Ask your agent whether they think the ROI is there.

    At the very least, get a few estimates and be ready to know how much the replacement cost will be, but I would not necessarily offer to cough it up right away. As buyers we asked for other fixes but not the driveway.



  12. #12
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    May. 14, 2008
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    My husband and I are listing soon also. While not a farm we are selling our current place to buy a farm.

    At first, I was incessant that everything had to be perfect, everything had to be fixed.

    And then I started thinking about it. No one is going to come in and pay what you are asking. They are going to come in low and if it isn’t for one reason it will be for another.

    Give yourself some room to justify the bids. 20,000 low, well the driveway does need paved and they will use that as the reason for the low bid.

    If everything is perfect, your going to get a low bid anyway and the reasoning will be because they can!

    For us, its carpet replacement. There is a small section 6inx6in that my cat snagged along the wall. Brillant me on my rampage to fix everything, took a razor and cut it out to I could go to Lowes and "match the carpet". Well they dont make that carpet anymore and now my 6x6 area is more like 12x12. And since I cant patch it the 12x12 area has turned into hallway, landing and steps.

    Ehhh, im going to leave it. Most replace carpet when moved anyway and I figure if that is the only thing wrong, they can use that as the justified low ball bid.



  13. #13
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    May. 24, 2005
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    Winter Park, Florida
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    We are looking to buy a farm, and honestly, a driveway will be the least of my worries...unless it is totally impassable or in a bad rain would create major havoc.
    In the country, I do not expect a perfect driveway. It would be nice, but it will not be a deal breaker.
    Lori T
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  14. #14
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    Mar. 19, 2011
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    Thank you all so much for your replies they are greatly appreciated!!!! Our house/farm will be in the 650-750k range for those who asked.... And am starting to think most will make an offer based on it and if any of the quotes are reasonable we can go ahead and fix it, if not it will be a negotiation tool!


    Oh and by no means impassible just a little on the bumpy side! Thank you again!!!!



  15. #15
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Agree with Babecakes...either do the repair/replacement yourself before marketing or get 2 or more quotes for the work in writing and then price the property for the market and offer $_____ back at closing for the driveway condition. If you're listing, make your Realtor aware so they make showing agents aware. That way they don't have to offer to find out the cost will be refunded at closing.

    But also be aware that it's also very common for buyers to want credit at closing for closing costs too.

    When getting repair quotes, ask contractors if there are other, less expensive options for sprucing up the driveway too.
    This method will save you "out of pocket" costs until the place is actually sold. Repairing the driveway is not a cost you can recover at sale time.
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  16. #16
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by dudleyc View Post
    The sellers would likely get an economical fix.

    So our thoughts as a buyer is that we would negotiate the excepted offer and do the repair ourselves.
    When we sold our last house, we replaced the carpet in the whole house. We used the cheapest stuff available. But the whole house looked beautiful! Sold the house for a fair price in a few weeks. I used some of the left-over pieces to make a saddle rack. That new carpet came apart as I worked with it ! If I were the buyer, I'd rather do the repairs.

    Perhaps you could make some superficial drive repairs?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    OP:
    I don't know if your price range is the median for your area or at the high end.
    You don't say how large (acreage) the property is.

    Around here that pricing would be at the higher end (unless it had a ton of land) & need the driveway repaired to show well.
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  18. #18
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    Jul. 22, 2007
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    I would leave it as it is and see what the first few prospective buyers say. Your sales contract will probably be for about 6 months, and if all the comments are negative you can get it fixed in that time period. If knowbody cares, you can save yourself the hassel and just give them a discount on the sales price, but only if they ask.

    I truly do believe if someone wants the house they won't care.



  19. #19
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    Sep. 29, 2009
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    I don't want another property without a concrete or asphalt driveway, prefer concrete. We have had a dirt road property, and now a concrete one, so no more dirt road. Tired of the whole dirt road thing, and this includes crushed rock too. Rock has so much dust, and it also can have pot holes. And no, I will no longer fill and do maintenance on a dirt road. I did that for 10 + years. No more.

    We will be buying in the next few years for retirement. If we see a driveway which isn't paved, or needs work, we will consider that in our offer on the property. IOW if it will take $20k + to fix or pave, then we will take of $$ on the sales price. It is a principal thing. We want no more dirt roads. Some may want them, we do not.

    Currently we live in a house / farm and it does have a concrete driveway. Came that way when we bought the house. And it is WAY way longer than 1200' btw.



  20. #20
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saidapal View Post
    I would leave it as it is and see what the first few prospective buyers say. Your sales contract will probably be for about 6 months, and if all the comments are negative you can get it fixed in that time period. If knowbody cares, you can save yourself the hassel and just give them a discount on the sales price, but only if they ask.

    I truly do believe if someone wants the house they won't care.
    That's just not good marketing advice. The longer your house sits on the market, the more people are likely to think that there's something wrong and they can lowball it.

    Although it really is better for the buyer to have a credit, many people just don't have the imagination to be able to picture the house with let's say crappy carpet than without. They also begin to wonder what other delayed maintenance there might have been.

    It really depends on how bad the driveway is and what your competition looks like. Check the ads for comps, check out the driveways of the farms for sale and you'll know in a hurry.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



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