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  1. #1
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    Default question about terminology ... if two colts out of the same mare are half brothers

    .. what about two colts by the same stallion? I've been told that horses are called half brothers only if they share the same dam. What about the offpring of a stallion?
    co-author of
    Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry
    www.duelforthecrown.com



  2. #2
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    Jul. 6, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportArab View Post
    .. what about two colts by the same stallion? I've been told that horses are called half brothers only if they share the same dam. What about the offpring of a stallion?
    In thoroughbred terminology, only offspring that share the dam are called half/ 3/4 or full brother/sister.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportArab View Post
    .. what about two colts by the same stallion? I've been told that horses are called half brothers only if they share the same dam. What about the offpring of a stallion?
    They are referred to as "by the same sire".

    The "brother" or "sister" term is reserved for horses that share the same dam because it is considered a special relationship. The average mare will put maybe 10 foals on the ground. A stallion can put 1000's on the ground during his career, so referring to all his progeny as half siblings dilutes the term.


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  4. #4
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    Default

    Unrelated more or less although by the same sire would be more descriptive.



  5. #5
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    Yeah, I was afraid that was the case. Currently writing a book and really did want to avoid saying the sire's name every other sentence. But I guess that's the way it's going to have to be.
    co-author of
    Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry
    www.duelforthecrown.com



  6. #6
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    May. 4, 2003
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    I have a mare, her mother and her grandmother.
    The same Irish stallion covered the mother and the grandmother.
    Does anybody know the relationship of the offspring? There is a term but I do not know it.

    I have a mare who produced two foals by different stallions. I call them half brother and sister.

    Right??
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  7. #7
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    Jul. 21, 2011
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    Co
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post

    I have a mare who produced two foals by different stallions. I call them half brother and sister.

    Right??
    Yes.

    With the Grandmother, Mother scenario, covered by the same sire you're getting into the 3/4 sibling range which scrambles my brain a bit , rather like second and third cousins (twice removed) in people.



  8. #8
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Scrambles my mind, too - even in my husband's huge family of siblings, etc.
    Can never get them sorted out.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  9. #9
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I have a mare, her mother and her grandmother.
    The same Irish stallion covered the mother and the grandmother.
    Does anybody know the relationship of the offspring? There is a term but I do not know it.

    I have a mare who produced two foals by different stallions. I call them half brother and sister.

    Right??
    Term for that? I call them 19th century European royalty myself.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Gum Tree PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I have a mare, her mother and her grandmother.
    The same Irish stallion covered the mother and the grandmother.
    Does anybody know the relationship of the offspring? There is a term but I do not know it.

    I have a mare who produced two foals by different stallions. I call them half brother and sister.

    Right??
    I believe they would be referred to as ¾ siblings, 3 part siblings, closely related. They would not be referred to as half siblings. IMO and experience. It’s a bit tricky because it is not seen to much.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Term for that? I call them 19th century European royalty myself.
    Good answer, too funny.

    As to the OPs question Drumblggl3 #3 is how they are always referred to on either side of the pond.



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