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  1. #1
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default Components of the Warm House, Or why do people put heating vents on the ceiling?

    I'm a cold sissy. My head spins around backward and I become bitchy and/or think that eating ice cream will help.

    So I'm all about the warm house. What are the key ingredients?

    And heat rising and all, WTF with heating vents on the ceiling?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  2. #2
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    May. 12, 2000
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    NE TN, USA
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    If it's a heat pump, they serve for both heating and cooling.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  3. #3
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Default

    Our vents are in the ceiling because the unit is in the attic. We renovated the house and put ac/heat in - though we mostly heat the house with a pellet stove.

    There are units that go in the attic; and the flexible conduit provides heat/ac through vents in the ceilings. That sort of setup is not uncommon in old houses that have been renovated.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  4. #4
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    Default

    So.... do you get any heat if the vents are in the ceiling? Or do you have to go all spiderman and live on the ceiling?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank B View Post
    If it's a heat pump, they serve for both heating and cooling.
    And I don't even know what a heat pump is.

    I have PTSD from a childhood of houses built before 1930 and a mom who said "Meh.... put on a sweater."
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  6. #6
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    Jan. 28, 2003
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    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
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    my heat vents are in the ceiling and I find my room gets too warm, had to get on a ladder and shut them off...lol
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  7. #7
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    Oct. 7, 2006
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    on and off the bit
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    I've heard it's cheaper to run the ductwork through the ceiling than the floor, and if the house doesn't have some sort of basement, I guess the ceiling route is the only way.
    Ceiling vents send down cold air in summertime that chills even me, the cold-weather-air fan (OK, pun accepted).
    Hot air rises, so I don't know how anyone could consider ceiling vents efficient in wintertime.
    A heat pump is a total-electric alternative to a gas furnace. It is a forced-air heating/cooling system like many gas furnace systems, just without the gas. Clean, flameless, efficient.
    --Proud and loving daughter of a Georgia Power electrical engineer!
    Founder of the People Who Prefer COTH Over FB Clique
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    "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    May. 12, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    So.... do you get any heat if the vents are in the ceiling? Or do you have to go all spiderman and live on the ceiling?
    Yes, it works fine. In my case, the first floor is built on a slab, so there's no place for the ductwork. I helped it along by installing a ceiling fan that's set to push the air upwards in the winter, pick up the warm air from the vent and return it down the walls.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Jan. 29, 2010
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    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    Default

    When we lived in Japan, we discovered "hotto kapetto" (hot carpet) - genius! I was looking at putting something similar in our basement in Northern Virginia; but then we moved to the Mississippi Gulf Coast. I think these are what I was looking at - something with a thermostat.

    http://cozywinters.com/shop/rug-heat.html

    http://www.tempurtech.com/electric-r...-rugs-mats.htm

    My dream home will have radiant heat built into tile floors.
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank B View Post
    Yes, it works fine. In my case, the first floor is built on a slab, so there's no place for the ductwork. I helped it along by installing a ceiling fan that's set to push the air upwards in the winter, pick up the warm air from the vent and return it down the walls.
    YES! Ceiling fans usually have a little switch to reverse the airflow - you want clockwise in winter / counterclockwise in summer

    http://www.thedailygreen.com/going-g...rection-winter
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Jan. 6, 2011
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    Florida
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    I understand you completely. I actually have trouble keeping warm and when it is 85 degrees out I am wearing jeans. I love heated floors and I want them so bad. I don;t have advice but just looking for future options.
    I am on my phone 90% of the time. Please ignore typos, misplaced lower case letters, and the random word butchered by autocowreck.




  12. #12
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    Nov. 8, 2012
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    gulf coast
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    My house is like Frank B's. I find that replacing single pane windows, and up-grading the insulation makes a big difference.



  13. #13
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    I'm a cold sissy. My head spins around backward and I become bitchy and/or think that eating ice cream will help.

    So I'm all about the warm house. What are the key ingredients?

    And heat rising and all, WTF with heating vents on the ceiling?
    Step one: Insulate.
    step two: get a decent heating system, one that does NOT rely on forced air...

    it leaves the bones of the house cold and as soon as the fan shuts off you get cold again.

    Dress for the occasion yes, I am cold, too: I live from October through April in my heavy duty fleece pullover, combined with down ski jackets (not the location, right!)

    Woodburning stoves are fantasic! I think i want one for the living room for next year. The house is small so it can be tiny!


    As to vents in the ceiling:
    Well, they make ceiling fans for that, since you likely want them for summer anyhow (but make sure your new one has the reversal switch!)

    I would love to have them in the ceiling. because I am not Martha Steward and hate house cleaning: there is always some crud falling down that thing, especially when you have pets, kids or the genius installing them thought it was PERFECT for them to be right next to the outside doors....



  14. #14
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    HVAC is a science but that doesn't mean everybody that puts it in is any good at it.

    We had forced air ducts put in the slab in one house and the return was up above the hall, makes sense right, maybe? The apartment had the ductwork in reverse almost, the heat came down the hall and the return was low in the end of the hall.
    My MIL's had the ducts all over the place, all the first floor were clustered around the utility room and the ones on the second all ran through the ceiling so her upstairs was always really hot in the winter and not so bad in the summer with the AC, but she didn't use the upstairs so . . .

    This double wide had some drunk design it, all the ducts run down the middle of the sides of the house and the registers are up against an interior wall or in the middle of doorways. I even have two of them in the kitchen and breakfast nook, about 18" apart in the same blasted doorway. It's OK for something like the sofa, toasty in the winter, but really bad for any wooden furniture to have hot and cold air blasting at it so I shut them, or try to, and then I stick a chunk of plywood on top of it with a plate from the weight set on it. Looks lovely.

    Honestly I really miss my woodstove.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  15. #15
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    Yeah, crazy to have vents in the ceiling. When I moved to California, it made sense in the summer because the cold air from the AC flows down. But in winter, when the heat is on -- what a crazy thing! All the hot air is around your head and the floor is cold! You'd think they could've put a few vents down low. As for the slab floors being the reason, NOT. In cold regions vents are in the floor OR in the lower part of the wall, near the floor. They do not have to interfere with the slab. But then again, in cold regions, some houses use baseboard hot water, old-fashioned radiators, or the newer radiant floor heating, so there are no vents.



  16. #16
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    Sep. 29, 2003
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    Townsend, MA
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    Radiant is the way to go. We have it under the hardwood floors and ceramic tiles in the den, kitchen and bathrooms. Nice to have warm floors in the winter. The bedrooms have hot air. Going on twenty years and never a problem with the radiant.



  17. #17
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    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
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    Hydro (heated water) radiant floor is the most efficient. Hydro radiators are next. The wonder of those is they stay warm hours after the boiler turns off.
    Our neighbors had a ton, literally, of radiators removed from the house they bought and replaced with forced air. They moved after, saying they couldn't afford the heating bill.
    There are some very interesting sites on heating large houses, lots of stuff to learn, like www.heatinghelp.com



  18. #18
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    Jul. 14, 2006
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    Because if heat vents are on the floor, the cats will lay on top, stealing the heat to warm their furry bellies and leaving you to wake up to a cold room. Ask me how I know....

    BES
    Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
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  19. #19
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    mvp-a heat pump is a warmer area heating/ cooling system. During AC season the inside unit runs the AC, with the outside fan going also (the outside unit-a compressor maybe? Where the Freon is). In the winter the furnace (typically in the attic here-we almost all have slab floors so the only place for the inside/furnace/blower unit is in a closet, in the attic (with a pan under it for water runoff, or in the garage or something) is electric with regular heat elements, and emergency coils, and the outside unit runs also during heat season. When I had a bunch (about 8") of wet snow at my previous house (the first time in recorded history they had that much) the outside unit melted the snow, and the wire baffles were ice coated, and I had to turn it off, hose the unit until the ice melted, and then it worked again. They are a forced air ac/heat unit, and work where you don't have natural gas or propane available, or in the case of propane have no intention of using it.

    If you put in forced air for ac and/or heat in an older house, then running the vents in the attic is easier, and in the case of my house with a slab the only way. Many places here only have the air return in the door of the furnace/ac closet, and heat/ac vents in the individual rooms.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueEyedSorrel View Post
    Because if heat vents are on the floor, the cats will lay on top, stealing the heat to warm their furry bellies and leaving you to wake up to a cold room. Ask me how I know....

    BES
    I'd fight a cat for a spot next to a heating vent. Heck, I spent my childhood duking it out with my sister for the prime real estate--- where you could see the TV and be warm!
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



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