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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2011
    Posts
    392

    Default starting a gated horse community

    I have been having this idea about wanting to start a kind of gated community (with or without the gates) for horse owners.

    more specifically, getting a group of people together who want to keep horses at home, buy adjacent land, and are getting on in years - you know - reaching the retirement age. but also, same group of people kinda making a commitment to look out for each other, help with horses if an owner gets sick, etc.

    I know several people who are either not wanting to depend on their kids, don't have kids, don't have a lot of money to hire people, etc but don't want to give up "horse keeping".

    does this sound crazy?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NYC=center of the universe
    Posts
    1,931

    Default

    Drool!! Sounds like paradise to me. I can't really comment otherwise, tho.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,228

    Default

    Would you let non-horse owners buy in? A couple of horse communities in NC I know have problems because the actual horse owners have become the minority. No one wants to pay to maintain the barn , pastures, horses stink, etc



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,626

    Default

    Look in to Co-Housing. I have long thought a Co-Housing Equestrian community would work, especially oriented toward retirees or affordability. Non-horse owners buy into equestrian communities because of the larger lot sizes or bucholic upscale setting. Remove those, make it more practical, and you would get a larger percentage of horse owners who want to form a community.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,649

    Default

    Bring money. Lots and LOTS of money.

    There are a number of these communities all over the U.S. A few do quite well, but a large number fail. Sometimes they fail due to poor management; sometimes it's due to poor economic conditions; sometimes it's due to squabbling owners (imagine a cross section of the COTH group to give yourself nightmares ); sometimes it's due to just bad luck.

    This is a game for professionals with deep pockets. It doesn't hurt to have a Name or two in the advertising. And good lawyers to deal with the Alphabet Soup.

    It might be a nice thing to do if you win $100 Million or so in the lottery; but don't bet your 401K on it.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,281

    Default

    We have a local subdivision with trails and a nice barn and pastures, they sit there idle, for whatever reason none of the owners want to use them.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    4,263

    Default

    Have always idealized this as well - may even have brought it up a year or so ago. Would be wonderful to be able to look out for each other's horse and each other. But can see the "combined COTH" effect as well.
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,224

    Default

    humm...how many threads are started each week here about the drama at the barn??

    so now you want locked in with the same people?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Shangri-LA
    Posts
    1,667

    Default

    We have looked at a few, some were too pricey, one had an HOA document that was a book and requirements that were ridiculous. The English riding based ones seemed the most expensive and the western based ones more affordable (at least the few I found). I don't think you can have a place like that without HOA rules; however, you want them to not crazy or create an HOA board that runs amoke. I think a central barn is a good option but would need to be run like a business and maybe not as a coop to avoid the barn drama, a few doing all the work, while others don't etc. so you would need a BM to run it and workers to help; maybe better to have each property have it's own barn and have a central arena, trails. I would love to live in an equestrian community, I'm guessing a lot don't advertise as I have done web searches and not come up with many. For those that are in the know care to post some names/locations of some? We've looked at the Oaks in FL, way too expensive and their HOA was ridiculous (at least when we looked), looked the National Roper's Supply equestrian development in TX, like it even if its more of a Western riding development, homes are cute and small with barn's attached, affordable and their HOA is good, not over the top with rules.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    438

    Default

    I've looked at a couple of these as I'm looking to buy a house right now. It seems that all of them out here have HOA rules that are out of control. One of them I read, you have to get any fencing you do approved by the board. Literally you couldn't fence or cross fence your own property without board approval. Not for me.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    1,504

    Default

    I lived in one a long time ago, like 10 years. The reason why there is a book of HOA rules and bylaws (which I agree is a must) is everyone's taste or budget is not the same. Using fencing as an example, a development should a homogeneous feeling; you shouldn't see white fencing along side electric braid fencing. Also, the construction of barns should have a similar architectual feel; a basic pole barn next to a planned barn and home would deflate property values. People do not want to see a development willy-nilly in design, it should be pleasing to the eye or property values suffer.

    The problem with one central barn versus privately owned barns is the management. In my case, a beautifully designed barn was eventually owned by an individual who thought he could make a lot money and found out he couldn't, nor did he have the checkbook to do it. After numerous BMs and employees, the place fell into disrepair and became an eyesore of the community. When I left to board my horse elsewhere, I was the only homeowner in the barn.

    I agree with the person who said bring lots of money.
    "You gave your life to become the person you are right now. Was it worth it?" Richard Bach



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8

    Default

    We have been looking for an equestrian community in Western Canada for a few years and it seems that what we want doesn’t exist. We want to share facilities such as indoor and outdoor arenas, dressage ring, stadium and cross country jumps, and trails. We want our horses at home in our own barn so ideally we want to live in a smallish acreage in this community. It doesn’t make financial sense for us to build our own indoor so sharing this and a field with XC jumps (which we won’t use very often) is very appealing. Having trails at our doorstep would be wonderful.

    We have always had the horses at home and I cannot imagine not being able to look out of the windows and see them as they make me smile. Also, having them at home and just sharing the facilities does away with a lot of the barn drama. Obviously the home owners in a community such as this would have to pay some sort of fee for the facilities and a grounds person to maintain it but I have to pay a trailer-in fee if I go to a barn/farm to ride now.

    I agree with Guilherme that it will cost lots of $$$. I am still waiting to win the lottery then I will be right on to it



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Shangri-LA
    Posts
    1,667

    Default

    The one equestrian community I looked at with the BIG HOA rule book, the HOA committee had to approve the color/type of mini blinds and curtains you put in your house! That's just a bit too extreme for me. I understand the need for HOA's and don't have issue with the community having a certain look, like same fencing, same or similar home designs; however, at the same time when it's a horse community, there will be trailers parked in yards, likely to have pets that you want behind a chain link type fence in the backyard. Hubby is likely to want a workshop etc. some of the HOA's are really strict about those kinds of things.



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