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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Brenham, TX
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    4,619

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    I have never had separate show tack until the Vespucci sale - LOL. Now my hunter has a show bridle and a show martingale. We will use it a few times before the first show, however, to make sure we get everything adjusted correctly and she is comfortable in it. And we may use it a few times before every show for a while until it gets broken in and seems "comfy."

    I bought one of my dressage horses a show bridle. I actually I bought it on sale as her regular bridle but it was SO nice when it arrived that I couldn't bring myself to use it as an every day bridle. So, I bought her another sale bridle as her every day bridle (that was also quite nice.) However, after a few years of only using it a couple times a year at shows and clinics, I decided it was ridiculous to have it hanging in my house 99% of the time. It is now both a show brilde and her every day bridle and it still looks great when it is freshly cleaned!
    Triple J Ranch Sporthorses
    www.triplejsporthorse.com
    Member - OMGiH I LOFF my mare(s) clique



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,204

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    I have a show bridle and show pads, the bridle is because I school and show in different bits, and it's much easier to just grab a bridle than trying to change out the bit before the show. My horse also has a fettish for chewing reins, nosebands, basically any leather, so that way my show bridle stays in one piece
    Proudly Owned By Sierra, 2003 APHA Mare
    In Loving Memory of Tally, April 15, 1983 - June 2, 2010



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Location
    Jersey girl!
    Posts
    1,289

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    I had a bridle for home and a bridle for shows. However, my mare was super sensitive when it came to her mouth. I couldn't figure out why she was so fussy with the bit at shows. Finally went to a charity show, and didn't bother changing bridles. She was lovely! I guess the show bridle, must have set the bit slightly different in her mouth. I never used it on her again. LOL

    As of right now I only have 2 schooling bridles that fit my guy. One for everyday that is a frankenstein of different custom ordered parts. The other is our tough love/I don't want to die bridle, complete with figure 8 that I squeeze him into. Lol I would love to buy him a show bridle, but that will be a complete custom and am too broke right now. LOL

    We do have separate jumping boots and saddle pads for shows. I use the same girth on him since I had to custom order it for size (66"!!!!). I don't need a martingale, although I imagine that would have to be custom ordered too and am very thankful I don't need it.
    Celtic Charisma (R.I.P) ~ http://flickr.com/photos/rockandracehorses/2387275281
    Proud owner of "The Intoxicated Moose!"
    "Hope is not an executable plan" ~ My Mom
    I love my Dublin-ator



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,150

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    I have two sets. Both are well broken in, but find its easier to keep the show tack cleaner for shows, one less thing to deal with, than having to worry about cleaning it. The bridles are the same with the same bit, only difference is the reins. As for the breastplate, I also have two but two different kinds: 5-point and hunter breastplate. I usually school in the hunter breastplate unless i know I am schooling for the jumper ring. I don't want to destroy the fleece on my 5-point!
    Forrest Gump, 14, OTTB
    Little Bit Indian, 26, TB

    Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,193

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    I had a separate show pad, but that seems like something anyone would have.
    I had two bridles, but not because one was a fancy show bridle and one was a schooling bridle. Different bits. Hacking bit and jumping bit.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2009
    Posts
    220

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    I have an Edgewood that became my schooling bridle when one of the cheek pieces broke (horse stepped through the reins when someone else rode him.) When I had it stitched they stitched over the hole that I used with my show bit. I was able to punch a hold through the stitching but was worried that it would rip while I was showing so I bought a really pretty Pessoa bridle for cheap at a silent auction to use as my show bridle. I have an assortment of parts that I mixed to put the fancier ones on my show bridle and the plain on my schooling bridle. I have 2 births, fleece for home and leather for shows. I have a fitted show pad for if I catch ride someone in the hunters and two square pads that I only use at shows in the jumper ring. My horse was way to hard to fit to even think about a different saddle to show in!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    6,854

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    I have a lot of bridles, probably 6 or 7, but I keep different bits on them all and rotate through fairly often (I have 4 horses so that's not as obscene as it sounds). None are "show" vs. "work" specifically -- I could show jumpers in any of them. I show so rarely that I like using the nice stuff everyday -- need to get my money's worth!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    the South
    Posts
    238

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    I always bought bridles I could show in and then let them "trickle down" to work bridles as they aged.
    This has been my policy. I don't have that much tack comparatively, but I got a new bridle that I put a snaffle on, so I use that in lessons to get it broken in enough for showing. The old bridle has a pelham on it for hacking.

    Last summer I got a new saddle so I splurged on a new girth that is reserved for shows only.

    My everyday halter is leather, but while my horse is at a show I use a nicer one that I won.

    I don't do jumpers often, but I have white square pads that are only for shows and clinics.

    OP, if the trainer uses your tack, I would suggest to get a cheaper everyday bridle that can get "abused", if possible. It's definitely not wrong to use a bridle for schooling and shows, but it's less likely to clean up well enough when it doesn't get cared for regularly. Unless tack cleaning is included with training, I do not know. I'm at a barn that is full service at shows but I still take my stuff home to clean myself because I know I can do a better job than someone who has to do 20+ bridles after a long day of work. It's something I enjoy too, so might as well make less work for the grooms who already do so much.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,493

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    More ideas:

    The truly professional people pay attention to their work tack: Those bridles have clips on the cheek pieces and reins for easy change out. The also use plain reins--- no lacing to *ever* scrub with a toothbrush. The reins might have martingale stops on them if the rider is of a jumper/crazy green colt persuasion.

    At shows, I have a leather halter with name plate and then a nylon grooming halter with name plate in custom barn colors..... Just can't see bathing a horse in an expensive leather halter.

    I know I'm a wacko, but come to a show with me and you will always have the equipment you need to look good while not creating an ounce more work than necessary.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2004
    Location
    City of delusion in the state of total denial
    Posts
    8,303

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    When I spend a serious chunk of change on a bridle, I don't just want to see it at a horse show. And if it's worth that kind of money, it should hold up to everyday use with good care.

    I do have show reins vs. work reins, though. The show reins are leather laced and the work are $15 web. I have a rein-chewer. Also, I hate cleaning laced reins.

    Don't have show vs. everyday pads, though.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,361

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    More ideas:

    The truly professional people pay attention to their work tack: Those bridles have clips on the cheek pieces and reins for easy change out. The also use plain reins--- no lacing to *ever* scrub with a toothbrush. The reins might have martingale stops on them if the rider is of a jumper/crazy green colt persuasion.
    .
    That's an interesting, and judgmental statement. The truly professional people have bridles with clips on the cheek pieces and reins? And they use plain reins? And they leave rein stops on them? Really? So those that don't have those things aren't truly professional?
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,681

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    Quote Originally Posted by toxicity View Post
    OP, if the trainer uses your tack, I would suggest to get a cheaper everyday bridle that can get "abused", if possible. It's definitely not wrong to use a bridle for schooling and shows, but it's less likely to clean up well enough when it doesn't get cared for regularly. Unless tack cleaning is included with training, I do not know. I'm at a barn that is full service at shows but I still take my stuff home to clean myself because I know I can do a better job than someone who has to do 20+ bridles after a long day of work. It's something I enjoy too, so might as well make less work for the grooms who already do so much.
    I thought about this as well and they do clean the tack after each ride. When I am there, I clean my tack because like you I think the grooms already have so much to do. And I find cleaning tack relaxing too.

    I always clean my boots, dust off my helmet after each ride.

    I want to preserve my fancy bridles for the shows but since I probably will be showing once a month (one week shows) I want to get my moneys worth like fordtracktor and others are saying

    Saying that, I have had bridles break or keepers come off. One needs repair now so of course you worry about that too.

    But I guess stuff happens at shows too. A favorite pair of reins got injured at the last show when my horse was being saddled - groom forgot his girthy-ness
    Last edited by doublesstable; Apr. 2, 2013 at 12:38 PM.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    6,854

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    I wondered at that too, RugBug. I have never seen a set of plain reins in any of my trainer's barns. Only laced and rubber, both of which need the toothbrush treatment (I particularly remember without affection my trainer's penchant for white rubber reins in the late '90s -- ugh!) We always cleaned tack every day at shows and at home. Twice a day at really dusty shows -- after showing was done, and a quick wipedown in the mornings to ensure it all looked pristine, every day. No clips because we had enough bridles with various bits that we didn't need to do much switching.

    "Reducing the amount of work" has never seemed to me a priority at most top barns!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,681

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    I always bought bridles I could show in and then let them "trickle down" to work bridles as they aged.

    Otherwise, there are so many reasons to have a nice show bridle:

    I want to buy bridles. They are about as close as I come to buying jewelry.

    If I'm the rider and groom, it's nice to have show tack ready to go after I have gotten the work tack dirty at the show.

    The horse who decides to chew on a rein or break one.
    This is so great - "I want to buy bridles. They are about as close as I come to buying jewelry."

    I have ordered a few bridles on line but I would much rather "feel and smell" them at the tack store.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2004
    Posts
    10,128

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    I agree with RugBug, good tack will last almost forever if cared for properly, why not enjoy it every day instead of just for showing? I haven't shown in ages but when I went back to riding I bought several high end bridles, because I got great pleasure out of using them in my everyday riding.

    Unless you campaign on the show circuit week after week at a time, I see no need for separate show tack.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,493

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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    That's an interesting, and judgmental statement. The truly professional people have bridles with clips on the cheek pieces and reins? And they use plain reins? And they leave rein stops on them? Really? So those that don't have those things aren't truly professional?
    "Take what you like and leave the rest" always helps unwad my panties.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,361

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    "Take what you like and leave the rest" always helps unwad my panties.

    Learning not to make sweeping, judgmental statements helped people actually want to be in the same room/conversation with me. To each his own.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2010
    Location
    Where they've got all Hell for a basement
    Posts
    1,132

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    I only use a separate show bridle in the hunter ring. Jumper bridle is my hacking bridle.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2011
    Location
    PacNW, WA
    Posts
    275

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    I used to only have just a separate pad for showing hunters but now I also have a show bridle and bit. At some point I decided to get a finer bridle for my horse's head and because I live in a wet climate and ride outside, I kept my other bridle as a schooling bridle. It would be hard to replace the show bridle since it has really uncommonly narrow cheek/nose widths.

    Plus I LOVE bridles, so don't mind having a few extras

    I also have 2 of the same bit so one is always nice and shiny on my show bridle. It's actually really NICE to not have to clean a bridle/bit before a show.

    So just a bridle/bit and pad are show only.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2010
    Posts
    246

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    I always bought bridles I could show in and then let them "trickle down" to work bridles as they aged.

    Otherwise, there are so many reasons to have a nice show bridle:

    ...

    The horse who decides to chew on a rein or break one.
    Exactly why I have a schooling and show bridle. Especially now that I have a horse who will chew on anything.



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