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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default Clicker Training...high value treats

    Any ideas for treats that I can stuff in my pocket?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  2. #2
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    Sep. 23, 2009
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    573

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    string cheese, freeze dried liver, baked liver (requires a baggy, then stuffed in the pockets), baked chicken (again, the baggy comes first).

    I personally tend to mix a little bit of everything together in a baggy and give them something different every bite. I usually add some kibble to the mix too. The other goodies coat the kibble with yumminess and make it higher value, and the dog isn't getting quite as much rich stuff on his tummy.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    From what I've seen, high value is usually people food. Hotdogs, cheese (love string cheese!), chicken, steak, organ meat.

    High value, pocket-friendly treats I think of string cheese kept in the wrapper, microwaved hot dog pieces so they are slightly dried out, and mini marshmallows but if you forget about them in your jean pocket for hours on a warm day you'll have a sticky mess.

    I've also used carrots and sweet potatoes: when raw it isn't messy. Container of baby food offered after each click contains the mess but is a handful. A lick-it stick.

    I clicker train with kibble until there is something really scary or difficult. Kibble and Charlee Bears stow away in every jacket I own -even after going through the washing machine =).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    "high value" is usually meat- bits of chicken or beef or liver.

    Lots of people use Zuke's minis, but from the reaction of most dogs I'd have to say these are only "moderate to low" value- plus they cost a fortune- at $14 a pound, you're far better off buying stewing beef, cooking it, and chopping it up.

    Another popular option is the microwaved hotdog- cut a hotdog up into small bits, wrap in paper towels (to absorb the grease), and microwave for 3 to 5 minutes, let cool. They get hard and crunchy and don't require refrigeration. Look for uncured hotdogs, they are much healthier.

    If you have a food dehydrator, this recipe produces high-value treats that are firm in the pocket but have a rubbery texture thus can be rapidly eaten:

    mix 1 can pumpkin puree with 1 pound of ground meat (I usually use ground chicken, but you can use anything), add an egg and a packet of unflavored gelatin; mix well. Pour into jerky gun and extrude sticks. Put in food dehydrator- dry on high heat for 4 hours, then turn the heat to low and continue drying overnight. Cut the sticks up into short bits.



  5. #5
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    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    I hate using hot dog bits, they make my hands sticky! though the dogs like them.

    My high reward treat for training is a bag of cat treats-Whisker Lickins or some sort of thing. They are small, the bag is resealable and the dogs go bonkers for them. I usually mix in a handful of dog/cat food also. They smell like the cat treat without all the calories ect.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    6,634

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    Cat kibble. Cheese. Dog trainer recommends "Natural Balance" rolls - they pretty much look like a fat salami and you can cut them up into tiny cubes. Cheese. Hotdogs. Cheese. Oh, and cheese.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  7. #7
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    I've been using cheese...great for the garbage truck. Thanks for all the other ideas. I'll have to get to work cooking treats.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
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    2,876

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    I boil chicken livers, cube them and then bake. Works well with my not-very-food-motivated dog.

    I use a treat pouch, rather than my pocket. And even then I use a baggie to line the pouch.
    Sheilah



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    16,565

    Default

    I made dog crack last time I showed the puppy. It was TOO high value and she spent all her time trying to get into my pocket...but it would probably be great for clicker training:

    Marinate cube steak in sugar water for a couple hours
    Pat dry well
    Season with just a touch of pepper and garlic powder
    Fry up in a little bit of bacon fat to very well done
    Drain on paper towels and use towels to press out as much grease as you can
    Allow to cool
    Dice

    This was dry and not greasy enough to have in my nice, expensive slacks pocket without issue. A little bit of a workout to prepare, but DAMN did the dog go for it.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 1, 2002
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    Midwesterner in Yankeeland
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    I've been using Vital Essentials freeze-dried raw food nibblets. Too spendy for everyday use, but just the ticket for a non-icky pocket-friendly jackpot treat.
    http://longestformat.blogspot.com/

    "The present tense of regret is indecision."
    - Welcome to Night Vale



  11. #11
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    In my experience, it depends on your dog. Some dogs have "iron stomachs" and can use almost anything. Most dogs love hot dogs, and many people use cut up bits of hot dog or other meat to train. If your dog can handle it and you have leftover meat without onions or garlic in it, it should be okay to use as a training treat. If your dog is more sensitive, then definitely take that into account and try a few of a new type of treat to see how your dog reacts.
    I have had good luck with the cheese. Cut up cheese cubes are nice, but they can be messy. The string cheese is usually a little bit neater to use than any other type of cheese. There are many brands of little training treats. They are expensive, but sometimes they are easier on a dog's stomach. I do buy training treats because of this, and then I mix in some bits of chicken or other meat. That way, the dog gets some really high value treats (the meat), but I don't have to worry so much about giving the dog too much of it and having digestive upset later. If you dog isn't prone to that issue, then I'd say you would be better off just using meat.



  12. #12
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Thank you everyone! Lots of great ideas.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  13. #13
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    Jul. 14, 2011
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
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    Default

    Years ago my trainer bought lots of lunchmeat to use in her Feisty Fidos class (for dogs that are fear aggressive) and it worked. The smell of bologna still makes me think of those times.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
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    815

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    Does using items such as bologna or hot dogs make the dogs very thirsty?

    I'm thinking that the processed meats while smelling and tasting great have a higher salt content than what the dogs are used to in their normal diet or compared to cooked chicken or meat?

    No criticism, just curious as I need a "high value treat" for recall training with my new rescue but don't want her downing huge bowls of water when we get home and having to pee while I am out of the house.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    I haven't noticed that in particular- I use ham for one of my dogs at agility trials, which has to be rather salty, and I reward her generously for good runs- but if you're doing A LOT of training, particularly with a smaller dog, you should certainly consider how healthy the treats you are using are, and also consider cutting back on the dog's regular diet.
    Another option is that Freshpet food they sell out of refrigerator cases in some grocery stores- the cat food comes in little round, soft pellets that are perfect for training, and it's a high-quality balanced diet.
    Most commercial dog treats have pretty icky, unhealthy ingredients, which is one reason why I like to make my own.



  16. #16
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    Mar. 26, 2008
    Location
    Maine
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    Default

    Natural Balance rolls cut into treat-sized pieces.
    "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"



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