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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Default How do I reseason cast iron cookware?

    I have a few nice skilets that I'd like to put back into use...can anyone tell me how to do it?
    Also, any good cast iron recipes would be greatly appreciated!
    Thanks!
    D>
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  2. #2
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    Feb. 26, 2011
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    Rub the pieces all over with Crisco, then put in the oven on the lowest setting for a couple hours.
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Sep. 23, 2009
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    Default

    Easy peasy!

    Clean the skillet well. Put enough oil in the bottom of the pan to coat it. Heat oven to 250, put skillet in oven, turn off oven, and leave it there overnight.

    To keep it seasoned, don't clean it with scrubbies or soap, just hot water and a sponge. After washing, make sure to get the water off it asap, don't let it air dry. We turn a burner on until it's hot, stick the pan on the burner, then turn the burner off. It dries it fast. If you do have to scrub and/or soap the pan, just add a little bit more oil to it.

    You can cook anything in cast iron. I do the majority of my pan cooking using the iron skillets. You can also bake a great cornbread in them, just follow any cornbread recipe, pour the batter in a VERY HOT skillet, and stick it in the oven. Yummy!



  4. #4
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    Anything you can make in a regular skillet or baking dish will taste better coming out of a skillet. I always make my cobblers in skillets instead of glass baking dishes. Obviously anything fried will be better!!
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  5. #5
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    Sep. 23, 2009
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    Default

    duplicate
    Last edited by Arrows Endure; Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:44 AM. Reason: duplicate post



  6. #6
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    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Default REal Simple

    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 16, 2000
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    Chatham, NY USA
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    Pretty much all we use. "Fry" just about everything - without (or with minimal) olive oil or butter. Cast iron skillets are the BEST!!!
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  8. #8
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    Sep. 16, 2006
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    615

    Default

    Yep, I love my cast-iron pans! I have one that's a little thinner so it browns things easier. Awesome for hash browns and grilled cheese sandwiches.

    One thing I was told was that cast-iron pans hold their heat better than non-stick so once they get up to heat, you can turn down the heat. I've found that's especially true on the thinner bottomed pans.

    Most of mine are old ones, hand-me-down from my grandma so they're scratched and scraped and the odd time there's a fleck of rust on them...but that's just more iron for me!

    Does anyone have newer cast iron pans? I've been eyeballing le creuset ones for a few months now.



  9. #9
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Le Creuset enameled cast iron cooks very well. HOWEVER, it's also very brittle. I dropped a $200 Le Creuset dutch oven, and the darned thing cracked and became worthless. Another French enamel coated cast iron pot was dropped and one handle broke completely off.

    Unless you can handle the weight and NEVER drop anything, I'd pass and say stick with good old American cast iron. I have some pots and skillets that are generations old and have been dropped in those years and still are just fine.


    Quote Originally Posted by OTV View Post
    Yep, I love my cast-iron pans! I have one that's a little thinner so it browns things easier. Awesome for hash browns and grilled cheese sandwiches.

    One thing I was told was that cast-iron pans hold their heat better than non-stick so once they get up to heat, you can turn down the heat. I've found that's especially true on the thinner bottomed pans.

    Most of mine are old ones, hand-me-down from my grandma so they're scratched and scraped and the odd time there's a fleck of rust on them...but that's just more iron for me!

    Does anyone have newer cast iron pans? I've been eyeballing le creuset ones for a few months now.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  10. #10
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arrows Endure View Post

    You can cook anything in cast iron.
    Not true! Lotsa tomato stuff for a long time (more than 10 minutes) will be bad in an iron skillet. The acid it tomatoes eats through seasoning PDQ.

    Everything else is great in iron skillets. My mom insists that iron skillets do add iron to the diet. She was also a big fan of animals and dirt as servicing a good immune system.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  11. #11
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    Feb. 20, 2009
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    Default

    I use my cast iron all the time because they work on induction but I’m a super scrubber and have to re-season them often. Not hard at all. My method is to put it back on the burner after using soap and a scrub brush (occasionally) and then “cooking” the oil back in on low heat for a an hour or so. The cast iron skillets we inherited, instead of bought later, are at least 30 years old and rubbed smooth. They are much easier to clean without any kind of scrubbing and my go-to non stick pans.

    This is one of my favorite recipes but you can make just about anything in them. Never considered the effect tomatoes would have on cast iron but I don’t recall a time I used one for cooking tomatoes. I have made deep dish pizzas in them, though.

    http://scaryreasoner.wordpress.com/2...hicken-recipe/



  12. #12
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    What about taking the baked on, black, slightly-greasy-feeling or flakey Skank on the outside of the skillet..... that someone thought you never needed to clean?

    Want seasoning, don't want skank.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #13
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    Default

    There was an old Scottish saying from before modern medicine--"the mair the dirt, the less the hurt." I use that saying a LOT.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Feb. 20, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    What about taking the baked on, black, slightly-greasy-feeling or flakey Skank on the outside of the skillet..... that someone thought you never needed to clean?

    Want seasoning, don't want skank.
    With my husband screaming over my shoulder that I was doing it all wrong!!1!1!!1, I scrubbed that crap off his mother’s skillets years ago and re-seasoned them. Now they are clean and usable for another 30 years in our family.



  15. #15
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    Jun. 16, 2001
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    Los Angeles, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    What about taking the baked on, black, slightly-greasy-feeling or flakey Skank on the outside of the skillet..... that someone thought you never needed to clean?

    To remove skank. Put pan in oven as your husband leaves for the day- put pan,lid and other cast iron skanked cookware in the oven and put oven on self cleaning cycle, Season pan right after before it rusts.
    Save Schrodinger's Cat!!!



  16. #16
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    Feb. 23, 1999
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    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
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    8,534

    Default

    Good article on cleaning old cast iron skillets here: http://www.hobbyfarms.com/crafts-and...refurbish.aspx
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    I'm in the scrub, wash, and clean camp. My mother's cast iron was as smooth as glass and almost like teflon in its non-stickiness. I do the same thing with mine as she did with hers: clean it with liquid dish soap and water, do a quick scrub with SOS pad, rinse, rinse, rinse, and dry immediately. Oil if necessary and heat it on the stove for a few minutes. Over the years the scrubbing with steel wool makes the inside of the skillet fine and smooth.

    I've never messed with the crud on the outside. It looks so daunting, I never thought to try.

    No special recipes here. I use mine for eggs, pancakes, pan fried meats and fish, sauteed vegetables, and cornbread.



  18. #18
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    Sep. 20, 2000
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Default

    i am also in the soap, scrub, rinse and a quick spray/wipe with Pam or canola oil camp. I use dish soap, I cannot stand my food tasting like what was last cooked in the pan. So far, my pans haven't combusted, fallen apart, or rusted. Actually, they are quite smooth. I love cast iron, Lodge is my favorite brand. I have the 8", 10" and the 12". I use the 10" pan the most, the 12" is pretty big and heavy. I also got the silicone handle covers from Amazon and they are great.

    I also have the Lodge dutch oven and its great for searing meat and then sticking in the oven for stews and roasts. Someone posted a quick and easy bread recipe using the cast iron dutch oven and it was worth it to buy it just for that alone !!



  19. #19
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    Isn't all cast iron created equal? You Lodge fans: What difference does brand make?

    Oh, and thumbs down on the La Crueset debacle. No way I'm paying lot$a money for some porcelain to break on cast iron. By the way, what's the point of covering cast iron with another material?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 10, 2008
    Posts
    379

    Default

    Lodge products= Made in 'Murrica
    They also make Le Creuset knock offs (enameled cast iron) which are great for tomato-based cooking. I use my Lodge enameled dutch oven for braising meatballs in sauce or doing stews and pot roasts with tomato products. Really easy to clean too because it is non-porous, although it will stain a little.



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