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  1. #21
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    Mar. 30, 2013
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by adhock View Post
    Sorry, but as a novice, I'm not sure what you're looking for in a college riding experience. If it's a social environment, great--go volunteer to help the team. But if you want to really learn about horses, do it independently--the team should be competitive (or as competitive as that kind of team can be). Regardless of status, I don't think that walk-trot is a legitimate division. Sorry, but that's an honest opinion. There are lots of other options for real learning, discipline and horsepersonship in the environs.
    It can't hurt to ask the coach though, if she wants someone more competitive than she can turn me down, it's not like she' required to take everyone who applies.

    Also, walk/trot/canter hunt seat equitation is a class, check these IHSA Nationals Day 1 picture captions
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/photos_v...ge=0&nid=34601

    Also, I'm not sure I can afford lessons at a barn in college
    Of the heart-aching, hard-working, hope-having, horse-loving and horse-less variety. We are a sad species indeed.



  2. #22
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    Sep. 2, 2008
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    Greeley, Colorado
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    4,188

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    I'm not sure about SCAD, but at my school (Clemson in SC) we had to pay $300 to join the club, plus lesson and horse show fees. It was NOT cheap.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Nov. 29, 2010
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    257

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    Quote Originally Posted by dani0303 View Post
    I'm not sure about SCAD, but at my school (Clemson in SC) we had to pay $300 to join the club, plus lesson and horse show fees. It was NOT cheap.
    It's free to ride at SCAD if you are on the team because it's a varsity sport at the school.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
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    1,875

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    OP your first semester at college is going to be one of the roughest because you're making adjustments in almost every aspect of your life. In my case I got good grades at a good high school and then got a rude wakeup call in college, when I realized the same amount of work was NOT going to cut it. So keep that in mind when you make a big time commitment for your first semester.

    That said, riding was a huuge stress reliever for me, and the time commitment forced me to manage my time wisely. There will be times when you have a test/project Monday morning and have to be away at a show all weekend. I knew that I couldn't depend on studying during the show or at the hotel, so I made sure that all of my studying was done the week before.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  5. #25
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    Apr. 23, 2001
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    Chicagoland, IL
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    1,705

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    Quote Originally Posted by adhock View Post
    Sorry, but as a novice, I'm not sure what you're looking for in a college riding experience. If it's a social environment, great--go volunteer to help the team. But if you want to really learn about horses, do it independently--the team should be competitive (or as competitive as that kind of team can be). Regardless of status, I don't think that walk-trot is a legitimate division. Sorry, but that's an honest opinion. There are lots of other options for real learning, discipline and horsepersonship in the environs.
    adhock, if, as previous posters mentioned, SCAD is competing IHSA rather than NCAA/NAIA, Walk-Trot is as "legitimate" as any other division in that the points a W-T rider earns for her win are exactly the same as those awarded in Open O/F. It's perfectly fine if you elect to look down your nose at those just learning the competitive end of the sport, but perhaps you should know a little something about the playing field before you make such cutting comments. You say that riding on a college team is about being "competitive;" an IHSA team simply can't be competitive without W-T and W-T-C riders. That's what the IHSA is all about.

    OP, if you find that your major doesn't allow you the time you need to meet the obligations of being a team member, you can always reassess.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Nov. 15, 2011
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    53

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    PM me. I'm currently on the team and will be there as a senior next year. Experience isn't necessary, it sounds like you've got enough to qualify as w/t or w/t/c! The beauty of IHSA is that you have riders of all different skill levels. Our team has both riders who show in Grand Prix to wonderful students who have never ridden before! I can tell you if you're willing to really work on time management, you can do the team and kick butt at your major. I was a double major for the longest time and if I managed my time well could easily take 4 classes and do the team. Email the coach to express your interest


    6 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Feb. 13, 2013
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    Where the wind comes sweepin' down the plains
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    It is definitely hard work and good time management is a must to participate. I did advanced w/t/c and novice flat (could have pointed out into intermediate flat if the team had needed it). I think my friends on the team that did the beginner levels would say it was a very rewarding experience and they learned a lot. You'll ride many different horses and have a very solid base equitation wise afterwards if you do ride for a team like that.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
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    880

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    I would definitely investigate but try to limit your showing the first semester until you get a feel for everything. Your main focus of college should be your education and everything else should fill in the spaces left by that.



  9. #29
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    Jan. 18, 2009
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    466

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    Quote Originally Posted by adhock View Post
    If you are a computer animation major, you'll be living more in Monty than on horseback. You might want to reassess. If you're a novice, take some up/down lessons but if you're committed to your major (which is very group-oriented and you can't let down your group), then you'll need to commit to long, hard hours in the dungeon! And, you will probably want to apply for the new dorms there, too!

    Sorry OP, but I have to agree. I only did local shows and landed a spot on the riding team at my school as an advanced WTC rider. I had to pay to take riding lessons as a course as well as riding practice - so that was lessons 2x a week as well as practice 1x a week and homework involved in the lessons in the form of papers.

    I was NOT an equestrian major, but a VComm major going for advertising (and not at SCAD, but still comparable). I did the team as a freshman and sophomore and it took a professor to tell me I had the talent but had to rethink why I'm at school because I was continuously late to classes because of riding lessons. The commitment to be part of the team was huge, and to tell you the truth - think about where you want to be 2 years after you've graduated. Is it having a job that you went to school for and being successful? Then perhaps consider putting the horses off for a couple of years.

    College is completely different from a high school work load, especially for any kind of design major. It demands a lot of hours and is very stressful, why would you add more onto your plate right out of the gate? Freshman year is just the beginning...

    Your future employer will *not* give two shitake mushrooms about your time on the riding team, but they will want to know if you know how to multitask for different projects and your commitment to do what it takes to get them done on time, talking to clients and other designers, and your art directors and creative directors and being able to defend your work. I can't think of anything that would help you that you would glean from being on the riding team.

    I would seriously consider putting off the horses until you're out of school... but that's from my own personal experience. Take that as you might, but I will say I do have a pretty nice job as a UI Developer when most of the people I graduated with are working in retail... not that that is necessarily a bad thing, but when you're putting that much money into your education, you'd probably want a job related to what you will be in debt to.


    Oh, might also be worth reaching out to this girl. I know she went to SCAD for advertising but ended up not liking it. http://sslubrant.tumblr.com/



  10. #30
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    Nov. 14, 2000
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    444

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    OP, if you got into SCAD for computer animation, you must have talent. It's really challenging (unlike some other majors at the school--definitely not all). Just take some time to assess...You will be in lots of group projects (it's a team as well as individual learning environment). If you drop the ball because of horses, you will be shunned by your peers and that is a huge no-no in group-based learning. Figure out your priorities and also the physical logistics. I'm assuming that you'll have a car because the equestrian facilities are pretty far from the dorms. When you're in Monty for 14 hours a day, you may want to reassess but you'll need to figure that out for yourself. I more than understand the riding bug but, at SCAD, your major really makes a difference to your ability to commit. That said, I think that the people with common interests you'll meet through the team are great, but the price may be pretty high. Just be clear on your priorities!



  11. #31
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    Mar. 30, 2013
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    Florida
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    Thanks everyone for your opinions, suggestions and encouragements, both in support of the idea and against it. Don't worry, I'm usually a very careful person who considers all the possible outcomes before making a decision, I'm not going to throw away my college education because of an extracurricular, no matter how much I love horses.

    I especially want to thank those who posted that were against the idea, sometimes it's hard to post when the majority isn't in your favor, but you keep everyone's heads grounded.

    Thanks for your input, and feel free to keep posting and discussing if any new info or suggestions come to mind!
    Of the heart-aching, hard-working, hope-having, horse-loving and horse-less variety. We are a sad species indeed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2004
    Posts
    61

    Angry Terrible experience

    We flew in from Canada to meet with the coach last year (name mentioned in previous posts). We had made a prior appointment with her. When we arrived she wouldn't see us, said she was too busy getting her picture taken. The barn manager said that the coach would meet with us the next day, well when we arrived the next day she had taken the day off. Unbelievable! I was so upset and still am.



  13. #33
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    May. 24, 2011
    Location
    New Jersey
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    I don't think you will make it honestly. A friend of mine started SCAD last fall and as a very competent rider she didn't make the team. She also said the coach was awful. She hardly even watched her ride. I think you would be better off with a weekly lesson outside the school if you really want to learn. Besides, ISHA is highly overrated as is any equine degree. Focus on your school work. It will get you the job to pay for horses as an adult


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Oct. 9, 2008
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    795

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xbittersweet View Post
    I don't think you will make it honestly. A friend of mine started SCAD last fall and as a very competent rider she didn't make the team. She also said the coach was awful. She hardly even watched her ride. I think you would be better off with a weekly lesson outside the school if you really want to learn. Besides, ISHA is highly overrated as is any equine degree. Focus on your school work. It will get you the job to pay for horses as an adult
    That really depends on what division she's eligible for. If your friend who's a very competent rider was only eligible for intermediate or open, she was probably riding against a lot of other very competent riders for a small number of slots. At least in my experience in the IHSA, it was harder to find competent riders for the walk-trot-canter division (which I think is what the OP would be eligible for).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    May. 24, 2011
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    New Jersey
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    141

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    Quote Originally Posted by hj0519 View Post
    That really depends on what division she's eligible for. If your friend who's a very competent rider was only eligible for intermediate or open, she was probably riding against a lot of other very competent riders for a small number of slots. At least in my experience in the IHSA, it was harder to find competent riders for the walk-trot-canter division (which I think is what the OP would be eligible for).
    The coach watched her walk and trot in each direction before ignoring her. Personally, thats a team i'd pass on



  16. #36
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    Dec. 7, 2008
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    257

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    I'm really surprised so many people think the OP shouldn't ride in college. I understand that she'll be busy with her school work, but if she's so busy that she can't manage a single social/athletic activity for 4 years, it means she has time management issues (I'm not saying you DO have time management issues OP, I'm just saying that not even the best students in the toughest academic programs do absolutely nothing but study).

    It may be that some semesters are busier than others, and during those periods you'd have to scale back your social commitments. But on the whole, you should be able to schedule some leisure time each week to ride/compete.

    I don't know anything about the SCAD team, but I loved the IHSA in college. I think it's a great way to socialize with like-minded students. If it turns out that the coach/teammates aren't to your liking, then by all means don't ride on the team. But you should find some sort of activity at SCAD so you don't end up totally consumed by your academic work.


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  17. #37
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    Jan. 18, 2009
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    466

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    Quote Originally Posted by c'est moi View Post
    I'm really surprised so many people think the OP shouldn't ride in college. I understand that she'll be busy with her school work, but if she's so busy that she can't manage a single social/athletic activity for 4 years, it means she has time management issues (I'm not saying you DO have time management issues OP, I'm just saying that not even the best students in the toughest academic programs do absolutely nothing but study).

    It may be that some semesters are busier than others, and during those periods you'd have to scale back your social commitments. But on the whole, you should be able to schedule some leisure time each week to ride/compete.

    I don't know anything about the SCAD team, but I loved the IHSA in college. I think it's a great way to socialize with like-minded students. If it turns out that the coach/teammates aren't to your liking, then by all means don't ride on the team. But you should find some sort of activity at SCAD so you don't end up totally consumed by your academic work.

    I'm guessing because the majority of people saying "no" are people who have either gone through the program or know of people who have, or in my case, went through the same sort of program at a different school... we already know what the work load is like...

    And we're not saying DONT YOU DARE RIDE... but perhaps find a nice lesson barn around the SCAD Campus and take lessons there instead of possibly paying extra fees and all the time it takes into being part of the team. Meetings, lessons, practices, lectures, show time set up, working shows, showing... it's a LOT of commitment for something totally unrelated to what she's paying all the money to go to SCAD for.



  18. #38
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    Aug. 7, 2012
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    340

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    OP, if you really want to ride, Id really suggest looking into off-campus options that allow you to schedule around your classes, etc. I did IHSA and I can tell you that I got more riding opportunities outside of IHSA than I did "on the team" Usually you only ride once or twice a week with the team but pay lots more than you would somewhere else. Then, once you factor in all the drama that goes with it, its really worth more if you go take private lessons with someone outside the college. You will learn more and pay less money and have more time! Win, win, win!



  19. #39
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    Remember that at SCAD, the OP will not pay to ride with the team. It is a varsity sport. At some colleges, IHSA is a "club sport" and is not financially supported by the school. That's where riding with the team can get expensive.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  20. #40
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    Mar. 30, 2013
    Location
    Florida
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    Yeah at SCAD it is a supported Varsity sport, I only have to buy a helmet and boots and lesson clothes. They outfit you in show gear (except boots). Trust me, I wouldn't even be considering it if I had to pay all the other fees because my parents made it clear they aren't paying for anything extracurricular. Just the idea of paying $200+ for a helmet scares me cuz everyone says that money is tight in college.
    Of the heart-aching, hard-working, hope-having, horse-loving and horse-less variety. We are a sad species indeed.



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