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  1. #1

    Default Leg crossing/planting neurologic test question

    When you cross one hind leg over the other to see how long it takes the horse to correct, does it matter *how* the horse corrects?

    For example: the right leg is crossed over the left, and the horse corrects by stepping out with the left leg, leaving the right leg planted.



  2. #2
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    I don't think so. But i may be wrong even though I have epm horses lol. I've never had that problem with them. I will say i had a twh that would cross his legs himself and uncross them many different ways. He was not neuro at all just weird lol.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halt Near X View Post
    When you cross one hind leg over the other to see how long it takes the horse to correct, does it matter *how* the horse corrects?

    For example: the right leg is crossed over the left, and the horse corrects by stepping out with the left leg, leaving the right leg planted.
    I think you'd have to take it in consideration with all of the other in hand neuro testing. Not just judging from one part of it. Make sense? How does the horse do with other "tests" ?

    Walking with head raised high, tail pull while standing, tail pull while moving, backing up, small tight circles, up & down hills, up & down a curb or over poles.

    Different neuro problems present themselves differently, so a horse may have more issue with specific movements and mostly fine with others. The hardest ones to diagnose are the ones that are affected to less extent of course.



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalDressage View Post
    I think you'd have to take it in consideration with all of the other in hand neuro testing. Not just judging from one part of it. Make sense?
    Yes, although in this case I just saw some things while watching videos of this particular test that made me wonder if it was significant. Not definitive - just something to consider, like not moving back to normal immediately is something to consider.

    I never see any reference to it in descriptions of the test but did see obviously neurological horses doing it and normal looking horses not doing it. Made me wonder if there was something to it or I was imagining the trend.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halt Near X View Post
    Yes, although in this case I just saw some things while watching videos of this particular test that made me wonder if it was significant. Not definitive - just something to consider, like not moving back to normal immediately is something to consider.

    I never see any reference to it in descriptions of the test but did see obviously neurological horses doing it and normal looking horses not doing it. Made me wonder if there was something to it or I was imagining the trend.
    Me personally - it would definitely make me investigate further. If a horse is standing square and then you cross the right over the left hind. If the horse (from that position) weight bears on the right and steps out on the left - he would be standing crooked (relative to the position on his front end). If he made no attempt to reorganize himself to standing square on all four legs in a more balanced way, it would raise enough of a red flag to investigate further. But I'm an unfortunate member of the neuro horse club, so I tend to be more suspicious than most.



  6. #6
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    I was told that it was more common for them to move the behind foot rather than the front crossed foot. So it doesn't really mean much about what foot they move to correct.



  7. #7
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    Not necessarily, they are all VERY subjective tests, and part of it, IMO, is just watching a lot of horses and developing a feel for what is neurologic and what isn't. For example, I had an FEI level dressage horse diagnosed with EPM - although he had genuine neuro symptoms, some of the tests they had to throw out for him - if you pushed on his side he very obediently sidestepped, crossing his legs, because that's what he knew and assumed the person wanted. Wasn't a neuro effect in that case. However, when he couldn't resist tail pulling, that was a different story. It really just depends on the horse.



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