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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
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    2,947

    Default Sammy won't stop growing UP, what to do with him??

    My Sammy, who is turning into my heart horse, has now taken another growth spurt. My shoer mentioned it when he was here the other day.

    The problem is, Sammy is going to be too tall for me. The top of his rear end is now higher than my head. Then Sam still has to fill our sideways. Thankfully, he seems so grateful to be here (yes, my Savior complex makes me think this) and is a dream to handle on the ground.

    The upshot is, with my creaking aging body, it's going to take a ladder to get my buns on his back. I've always been leery of really tall horses, too far from the ground.

    So, what do people do with a too tall horse who you adore?
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
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    32,649

    Default

    drive.

    but you know, a good, sane horse that happens to be tall is much nicer than a short one that can launch you up before you descend....


    6 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2013
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    drive.

    but you know, a good, sane horse that happens to be tall is much nicer than a short one that can launch you up before you descend....

    yep! Cause when a short one launches you up instead of just sideways and down you may just go from being 14 hands from the ground to 18+ hands from the ground before coming down did that on a nasty 14h pony, I though it would be easy, yeah right



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2011
    Location
    IE SoCal
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    886

    Default

    Height doesn't really matter too much once you're in the saddle, it's just getting there that can suck.

    Invest in a good mounting block, and teach him to bow so you can get on. No, seriously. Teach it and then use it sparingly as a reminder, saving it for those times when you need to mount on the trail and nature hasn't provided anything suitable to give you a boost. I know people who have taught the horse to lie down for the same reason, but IME a bow is easier and you don't need as much flat, even ground to ask for it.

    Also work at home so he knows that 'mounting block' covers a wide variety of items, from stumps to tailgates and everything in between and he needs to sidle up to and stand at whatever you ask him to. I found out the hard way once, many miles from home, that the horse that parked himself and stood stock still while I mounted from the green plastic block, whether it was at home a show or a trail head - had his world rocked when I tried to mount from a fence. I spooked him so badly he wouldn't even consider standing next to anything else. It was a long, long walk home.
    ______________________________________________
    My Blog -horses & photography



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    5,384

    Default

    Can you add me to the "my horse had had an amazing growth spurt" club !

    Seriously though, if he's sweet and willing to ride and looks after you, I'd try to stop worrying about the height and nod knowingly when people make comments (after you've watched them get run away with/bucked off/tossed into the fence from their naughty "smaller" horse)
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Posts
    3,316

    Default

    Many a tall horse on the trail has been made to stand in a ditch or hole! I've mounted from steep hillsides. Fallen trees.

    There are also stirrup extender straps that you can carry in your pocket.

    You will also need to teach the drop head to bridle. Get plenty of sturdy buckets to turn over for your aisle so you can groom too.

    If you're feeling old and he fills out just think of it as a sofa ride!
    About the only time losing is more fun than winning is when you're fighting temptation.
    -- Tom Wilson, actor & comedian



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
    Posts
    1,311

    Default

    I just built a taller mounting block.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Don't they make special stirrups that can be lowered so that you can mount from the ground if needed and your horse is too tall?? If you like him that much and you feel safe riding him I would keep him. A truly good one is hard to find..



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2010
    Posts
    31

    Default

    my big horse is 16.3 and i am 5'1 all my horses i have taught to let me mount from anything including jungle gyms and it has come in handy! ive gone on trail rides where other peoples horses have spooked and ive had to get off and help them and have used the most random things to get on from and even taught my horses i can get on from the right side just in case and they could care less. so dont worry about height just enjoy your "pony"



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,358

    Default

    A plus to teaching him to stand next to all sorts of "Stuff" Truck bumpers were the hardest. Noisy metal sign almost as hard. Garbage cans were easy. I expected the noise & wobble to spook him .. I was wrong.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,947

    Default

    All good replies. Nothing seems to bother him as long as he can mouth it and somehow he figures out 'it' is okay. He's one nippy guy. Not to hurt, but to check things out.

    Sorry, I wasn't clear, still not sure if he's broke or not broke very well. A cowboy friend of ours thinks he's at least a greenie but with the bad weather and icky ground, I haven't gotten too far. It's just he's growing and growing, it's rather daunting. I have in my minds eye, clutching him into 4-wheel drive and hitting the mountain behind us, he's very brave as far as I've seen about weird stuff around our place, he advances on scary stuff to check it out by mouthing. Just going to be a long way to the ground....
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2007
    Location
    (throw dart at map) NC!
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    4,944

    Default

    There is nothing wrong with leasing out or selling a horse that ends up being too big for you. Little riders on big horses can (can) be ineffective and end up not enjoying the ride too much. I've seen this happen many times. If he's truly your heart horse but you don't want to ride or sell him, perhaps you can offer the ride on him to a larger rider and get a horse more suited to you in the mean time? Or trade rides on another horse? This way, you don't have to sell him but his expenses are paid and he progresses. You can always negotiate to take the ride back when he's mature and trained.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2010
    Posts
    318

    Default

    Getting on is the easy part, just teach your guy that anything is considered a mounting block and that mounting from either side is normal.
    For me, with my arthritic knees, getting off is the hard part. That springing jump down aint so springy anymore, so my guy has been taught that parking by things I can clamber off onto, so I don't get that jar as I dismount.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Posts
    4,373

    Default

    I'd see how it goes with his training and if he IS your heart horse - stop measuring him

    When we were shopping for our last horse, out goal was 10 yrs, been there done that draft cross around 15.2, but absolutely not over 15.3

    Looked at a lot of horses. Apparently, but the time they get to 10 and been there, done that, nobody's selling. We finally found Cooper who fit all the criteria, but was only 6 and near the top of our height range. Figured we should be OK... how much could he grow?

    Brought him home and he's great except he seemed to be stretching upwards a bit. We decided it was best not to know and it's worked out well for us all.

    Of course, we don't ride any more so we aren't so worried about needing the escalator to get on and oxygen once up there



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Location
    Jersey girl!
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    1,298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drive NJ View Post
    I'd see how it goes with his training and if he IS your heart horse - stop measuring him

    When we were shopping for our last horse, out goal was 10 yrs, been there done that draft cross around 15.2, but absolutely not over 15.3

    Looked at a lot of horses. Apparently, but the time they get to 10 and been there, done that, nobody's selling. We finally found Cooper who fit all the criteria, but was only 6 and near the top of our height range. Figured we should be OK... how much could he grow?

    Brought him home and he's great except he seemed to be stretching upwards a bit. We decided it was best not to know and it's worked out well for us all.

    Of course, we don't ride any more so we aren't so worried about needing the escalator to get on and oxygen once up there
    I stopped measuring mine at 18hh. People ask all the time "how tall Is he?" and My reply is always I stopped measuring once he hit 18hh.

    As far as riding goes. Tall mounting blocks are a must. Remember he is bigger so your aren't really going as fast as it feels. And all those tree limbs that were easy to get under on the trail, well they are a lot closer to you now. Lol Besides, now you don't have to bend over as far to brush under his belly...
    Celtic Charisma (R.I.P) ~ http://flickr.com/photos/rockandracehorses/2387275281
    Proud owner of "The Intoxicated Moose!"
    "Hope is not an executable plan" ~ My Mom
    I love my Dublin-ator



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2011
    Posts
    56

    Default

    "Remember he is bigger so your aren't really going as fast as it feels. " Oh my goodness, as someone who is a bit...er, leery of horses who like speedy canters and forget brakes, that was the hardest part for me to adjust to (riding a 17 hh mare). I tell myself that she's not going that fast all the time.

    Sadly the only advice I'll offer to the OP is that she can send him to me. I LIKE the tall ones, even if I freak myself out on them sometimes. My enjoyment of them predates my fall. >.>



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2012
    Location
    MS Gulf Coast
    Posts
    608

    Default

    I seem to have a knack for picking the tall ones. My 12 year old Friesian/Appaloosa cross gelding is well north of 17 hh. I honestly have no idea how tall he really is, and I'm not sure I really want to know. I wouldn't be surprised if he's 18 hh (his dad was a 17.3 hh Friesian). My coming 5 year old Trakehner gelding was 16.2 hh when I bought him last February. Just measured him yesterday and he's 17.1 hh at the withers and a smidge under 17.2 hh at the butt (major growth spurt going on right now).

    No advice for the OP. Just know the feeling well when they keep growing beyond expectations.



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