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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
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    Northern VA
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    Question Softening the inside of field boots -- haaaalp

    Last fall I bought a pair of Ariat Crowne Pros on clearance. However, since they're the new version of Ariat (meaning they're made in China, not Italy), they're SUPER stiff on the inside. I've tried Effax Lederbalsam and Leather Therapy conditioner, but nothing seems to want to soften them. Any suggestions on products I should try?

    Thanks!
    -my life-
    Translation
    fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
    skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2010
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    940

    Default

    I used some olive oil around the ankle area on the inside to help soften the leather and that seemed to do the trick.

    You might also want to take your boot (while not wearing it) and flex it as you would if you were putting your heel down in the saddle. That has helped me in the past as well.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2003
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    Tucson, AZ
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    933

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    Bicks Leather Conditioner
    ~~Some things are true whether you believe them or not~~

    *Member of the "I hate the crest release" clique*



  4. #4
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    Nov. 3, 2010
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    163

    Default

    I know this is going to sound weird... But rubbing alcohol works miracles. Saturate the inside exactly where it's stiff, and then put the boots on.
    Last edited by LuvMyRide; Mar. 28, 2013 at 12:36 AM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    i second the rubbing alcohol idea. It really does work!



  6. #6
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    Aug. 25, 2012
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    641

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuvMyRide View Post
    I know this is going to sound weird... But rubbing alcohol works miracles. Saturate the inside exactly where it's stiff, and them put the boots on.
    This is actually stretching the leather not softening it. Very handy for also stretching out the calves of boots or the ankle area if any pinching is occurring.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
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    You can try the water method that people on here post about. Basically soak the boots and walk around until they're dry.

    The same thing kind of happens when you just ride in them and your horses sweat gets the boots wet. It's a little gross but it works! It's what helped break my boots in (and then after riding wipe off and condition as needed)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
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    641

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    Quote Originally Posted by KateKat View Post
    You can try the water method that people on here post about. Basically soak the boots and walk around until they're dry.

    The same thing kind of happens when you just ride in them and your horses sweat gets the boots wet. It's a little gross but it works! It's what helped break my boots in (and then after riding wipe off and condition as needed)
    I bathtub'ed boots before and I wouldn't say it made the leather softer necessarily just stretched out the parts that were a bit tight and made them fit better.



  9. #9
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    Jul. 2, 2003
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    Yep, I've already done the "bathtub" method twice to stretch them out. The calves fit wonderfully, but the whole boot still feels like it's been lined with plastic. :P

    I have an older pair of Ariat Heritage field boots (same Made In China) that are much softer on the inside, yet technically they're the lower end model -- I'm not sure if the lining is different, but I can't figure out why I can't soften the Crownes.
    -my life-
    Translation
    fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
    skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
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    Horray for a) the search function so I could find this thread and b) the rubbing alcohol suggestion. I just got a pair of these exact boots, which fit my skinnier calf perfectly (the one I measured) and cut off circulation to my other foot when I forced the zip up. The alcohol instantly softened the tight one and let it stretch. It's still tight, but I can walk, flex my heel, and still feel my foot (and can now zip sans pliers!) Thank you so much!



  11. #11
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    Mar. 22, 2005
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    Where it is perpetually winter
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2011
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    I have always used Lexol on the inside of the boots; give them a good soaking inside the ankle and foot area with the Lexol, put them on and wear them around the house for an hour; Lexol them again, and keep wearing them; walk the dog, do the dishes, etc., in these boots while Lexol-ing them frequently for a few days before riding in them. I've used this on new Dehner customs as well as retail Ariats (heck, one time I even wore the new boots to the office for a couple of days and no one noticed my footwear). Works for me. Good luck.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2005
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    Sweet, sweet Virginia!
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    If you can find it, try Blackrock. I used it a lot to break in a pair of boots. May have to look for it in a boot or shoe store.

    http://www.amazon.com/BLACKROCK-LEAT...ords=Blackrock
    "Radar, the man's ex-cavalry: if he sees four flies having a meeting, he knows they're talking about a horse!" Cptn. BJ Hunnicutt, M*A*S*H Season 4, Episode "Dear Mildred"



  14. #14

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    I have these for my schooling boots, and I treat the inside with a little bit of KL Select's Mad Cow, it seems to be softening it little by little without stretching the leather (I like my boots tight, tight, tight! )



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