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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2012
    Posts
    116

    Default How does your vet diagnose Lyme?

    Question and a mini-rant...

    How does your vet diagnose Lyme?

    I used a 4DX Snap test from work to test my horse (the test is validated for horses in a peer-reviewed paper, which my horse vet was not aware of) and my horse was, as expected, positive. He's had all of the symptoms of chronic Lyme. Spooky, muscle soreness, sensitive to touch, intermittent shifting lameness, grumpy, NQR basically.

    My vet seemed to not want to accept a diagnosis based on a Snap test positive. Maybe she was upset that I diagnosed him myself? She wants to send out for a PCR at Cornell before starting treatment, because "treatment has risks". I'm reluctant to spend another $80 to tell me what I already know, my horse has Lyme. The barn vet day is Friday, so I can discuss it more then, but in the meantime curious if my vet is behind the times in diagnosis. What would you do?
    "Here? It's like asking a bunch of rednecks which is better--Ford or Chevy?" ~Deltawave



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    Hmmm. My vet uses the snap tests, and will treat if the horse is symptomatic.
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,347

    Default

    I don't know much about the snap test, but last year my horse tested positive (20,000) on an ELISA titer (vet #1 wanted to treat), but negative on the Cornell test (with new vet one week after titer). Glad I didn't treat Lyme that wasn't there.
    "And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse..." ~Revelation 19:11



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2009
    Posts
    150

    Default

    My horse was just diagnosed with the Cornell test. It can differentiate between a new or chronic infection. Here is a good article about the Cornell test:
    ahdc.vet.cornell.edu/docs/Lyme_Disease_Multiplex_Testing_for_Horses.pdf
    Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,774

    Default

    I did both on one of mine. First the SNAP to give us an idea of the source of her problems, then a follow-up with the Cornell Multiplex after 30 days treatment to see how she was doing.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926
    RIP Carleigh 1999-2011



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Cornell test. I don't waste my money on the snap tests. All of my animals have been exposed to lyme and test postive except for the cat.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    9,896

    Default

    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2012
    Posts
    116

    Default

    Yankeeclipper, the Snap test will not show positive unless there is a recent or active infection. ELISA will stay elevated for much longer. The multiplex test can differentiate as well.
    "Here? It's like asking a bunch of rednecks which is better--Ford or Chevy?" ~Deltawave



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,845

    Default

    The SNAP test is an ELISA.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    836

    Default

    I think the SNAP is against C6, which is pretty specific. I could dig out my older Lyme notes if you want them...

    But sounds like I'd be asking a different vet for opinions. That particular attitude on a different microbiological thing is why I ended up switching practices.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    The snap test for dogs, human and horse has always been presented as unreliable with false positives and negatives. I typically do Western Blot and now the Cornell test for canine and equine. I'd rather spend the money on one reliable test rather than two. Just my preference. It may not be the right option for other people.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



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