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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2009
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon
    Posts
    540

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    I have a bridle I got when I was 11 years old. It's all in one piece. I don't remember the rand, but it only has a couple mouse nibbles on one of the reins. Not serious damage.

    I used it daily and showed in it.

    The bridle is 28 years old. It's still beautiful and is probably back in style again.
    Quote Originally Posted by dizzywriter View Post
    My saddle fits perfectly well. It might be a little tight around the waist, but I take care of that with those spandex things.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    310

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    I plan on my Antares going forever! It's got about 6 months use so far and it hasn't even been broken in.

    My dressage bridle I got about 5 years ago took its last trip to the show ring last year, schooling only now! Not a well known brand (I don't think) but it stretched out terribly!



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    (The Woodlands - Tomball, Tx)
    Posts
    1,162

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    Quote Originally Posted by vxf111 View Post
    Quality pays when it comes to leather. Those bridles are, imho, total junk and not worth even the cheapo purchase price.
    I disagree strongly! They are probably the best value in bridles on the market. They do everything a bridle is required to do, even look pretty good. (I have had quite a compliments on my "nice bridle" thru the years, which always made me chuckle.)

    Their one flaw is that they have stiff leather that will never soften too much.
    Yes, I know how to spell. I'm using freespeling!

    freespeling



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    6,035

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Yes, I never could quite bring myself to consider getting one though they were, as you say, "the ultimate fancy bridle."

    Here's a pic:

    http://www.tackwholesale.com/rolled-...eup2-2888.html
    Ewwww....yeah no thanks!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,905

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn/aissance View Post
    Though it's not a bridle, I'm going to throw my mother's chaps up here for contention of a runner-up age prize. I won't tell you how old they are, because that would also tell you how old my mother is, and you know about asking ladies their age. Not quite up to MGP's and Janet's bridles. But she got them when she was 13 or so, and not only are they still in great condition, but she still fits in them.
    How has she not worn holes in them at the calf???

    I have two pairs of chaps and switch them off with tall boots, and both are out of commission because they are waiting to go to Beval's for another patch job.

    Meanwhile I've had a Hadfields for over 10 years that, while it is now stretched out and almost never gets cleaned, when I do clean it it looks great still. I took the laced reins off and only use those for shows. I used to clean those with a toothbrush every ride (oh, youthful vigor..and only one horse to ride...) but these days I just categorically refuse to deal with laced reins unless a horse show or clinic is involved.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    17,074

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldilox View Post
    That is exactly the kind of enabling I am looking for Now on to decide which one...

    I do plan on keeping my old one, as I've said, and judging by the other responses I hope it'll remain a good schooling bridle for years to come.
    The fact that they last so long is just another reason why it's never a waste to buy another! It will always find a good use.

    Since you want enabling, I'll share that I have at least 8 bridles accumulated over my 4 decades of horsedom.

    (And that's just from memory, not from going down into my tack and counting.)
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  7. #47
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
    Location
    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
    Posts
    24,031

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    Quote Originally Posted by altjaeger View Post
    I disagree strongly! They are probably the best value in bridles on the market. They do everything a bridle is required to do, even look pretty good. (I have had quite a compliments on my "nice bridle" thru the years, which always made me chuckle.)

    Their one flaw is that they have stiff leather that will never soften too much.

    The problem with that stiffness is that it does mean the bridle will break, crack or fail much sooner than leather that is prepared better. Those 25-60 year old bridles people are speaking of have all probably been stressed at one point or another and they didn't break because the better leather will withstand more. Also that stiffness becomes cracking at natural stress points sooner rather than later - natural stress points in leather are those folded over areas: where the bit connects to the headstall and to the reins, and that is a safety concern at some point.

    Obviously we all have to buy what we can afford, but it should be with the knowledge that isn't just a less expensive bridle, it's less expensive for a reason.
    I drink and I know things. That's what I do.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2004
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    921

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    Quote Originally Posted by Outfxed View Post
    My double square raised New Calvary bridle was bought in 1990 so that makes it 23 yrs. old. Its my only bridle, its well used and cleaned after every ride and I loff it to pieces!
    I have several New Calvary bridles, and they wear beautifully. One is from 1990 as well. Another is probably only 10-12 years old and I still get compliments on it regularly, and it was used everytime I rode.

    I have a bad bridle habit, so I have Stubben & Crosby bridles as well. They all wear beautifully, and the oldest (still going, but not pretty) is 35 years old. It's a Crosby.

    I also have a set of Crosby laced reins that are really fat (LOL), and are probably 40 years old. They are still supple and lovely.
    Last edited by Thoroughbred1201; Mar. 27, 2013 at 03:11 PM. Reason: additional
    The truth is always in the middle.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2004
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    921

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    I remember the rolled ones, in my area it was 1973 that I first saw them. I have an el cheapo braided cavesson and browband, made out of genuine plastic and sewn over the leather, the leather is fine, bought that one used 7 years ago.
    I remember the rolled! They did look nice on some really fine TB heads, but I always lusted after the raised.
    The truth is always in the middle.



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,736

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    Hmmm, one is a Steubben that was given to me, so it's probably around 10-15 years old. My Collegiate jumping bridle came free with my saddle, so it is about 6 years old. The third is a Courbette I found moulding in a tack room and I cleaned it up, it's probably about 6-8 years old. They are all in fine condition, I have no reason to purchase more (I have two horses, one a competing eventer, one half-retired teaching a re-rider).



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    Englandshire
    Posts
    600

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    I'd actually like to get one out of the UK catalog Loopy posted.
    Some nice stuff there, it's a popular showing tack sales site here, good leatherwork, I think he hand makes bits as well.

    Since people are mentioning brands, I had a look through my bridles earlier and the branded ones are mostly Jeffries bridles, which I like, some others I had made to measure to fit various of my horses by a saddler, and the World War II one hasn't got a makers mark I can see.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    (The Woodlands - Tomball, Tx)
    Posts
    1,162

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMK View Post
    The problem with that stiffness is that it does mean the bridle will break, crack or fail much sooner than leather that is prepared better. Those 25-60 year old bridles people are speaking of have all probably been stressed at one point or another and they didn't break because the better leather will withstand more. Also that stiffness becomes cracking at natural stress points sooner rather than later - natural stress points in leather are those folded over areas: where the bit connects to the headstall and to the reins, and that is a safety concern at some point.

    Obviously we all have to buy what we can afford, but it should be with the knowledge that isn't just a less expensive bridle, it's less expensive for a reason.
    I absolutely agree with all this. I should point out I broke this bridle by doing something stupid. Being a senior, I had a senior moment and forgot I hadn't removed the end of the browband from its keeper. And, being tall, this wasn't visible to me. And finally, being strong, I gave a mighty yank on the end of the browband and ripped it right thru the keeper. Anybody using this bridle normally would never have broken it.
    Yes, I know how to spell. I'm using freespeling!

    freespeling



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    11,711

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    I have one schooling bridle that I've had since 1984.

    I expect a bridle to last until I no longer want to use it, that could mean 20+ years, it could mean 6 months...in which case it gets sold and should last until that person no longer wants to use it.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,328

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    I have one of my moms old hunt bridles, you know, the very plain (traditional ) flat wide noseband and browband. I believe the stamp (makers mark) is still visible and it was made in England where she was living on base as a teenager. I only use it to start young horses but it is still in great working order after over 40 years



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    11,711

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    Quote Originally Posted by BAC View Post
    Not really, all the pieces are rolled, the entire head stall, cheek pieces, crown, browband, etc. I can remember when they were the ultimate fancy bridle, I am glad they are no longer popular.
    My trainer gave me one when I was a wee thing. It was probably my first piece of tack...and I NEVER used it because I thought it was hideous. This was early 80s, so I'm sure it was given to me because it had gone out of style. For reasons only a psychologist could decipher (can you say "tack hoarder?") it is still hanging on my tack hook in the garage.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2013
    Posts
    166

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    I have never spent more than $120 on a bridle and they have all worn beautifully. My all time favorite is a Circuit (Dover Brand) black snaffle with flash. I bought it about 12 years ago and it still looks very nice. it held up well enough to make me puchase a Circuit double bridle as well. I also bought a Crown bridle that looked great for a few years but the dye has come out of it, partially due to one horse's habit of rubbing with the bridle on. I have a raised, fancy stitched suffolf bridle as well and it looks great and has gotten a lot of compliments.

    I have also inherited a few older bridles from an older friend but they are not the current style, so I dont use them much.

    Based on my experience, I will continue to buy cheaper bridles that I would not feel put out replacing if a horse broke part. So far, reins are the only part I've had to replace.



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    20,350

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    Quote Originally Posted by altjaeger View Post
    I disagree strongly! They are probably the best value in bridles on the market. They do everything a bridle is required to do, even look pretty good. (I have had quite a compliments on my "nice bridle" thru the years, which always made me chuckle.)

    Their one flaw is that they have stiff leather that will never soften too much.
    Agree to disagree. For $40 more you can have a Harmon Kraft bridle from Smartpak with leather close in quality to high end English bridlework. In the "under $100 price range " you can do so much better. Even Dover's Crown line is a huge step up. I think the Suffolk is not worth any money when you can jump up many steps in quality for just a bit more.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Button View Post
    wow, thank you for reminding me why I don't need a donut this morning. That is amazing!
    My personal reaction was "that b!^ch"
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    11,711

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    Quote Originally Posted by EnjoyThe Ride View Post
    Based on my experience, I will continue to buy cheaper bridles that I would not feel put out replacing if a horse broke part. So far, reins are the only part I've had to replace.

    I used to be a cheap bridle person. Still am in a lot of ways, however, after getting my inexpensive but sooo nice for the price Aramas, I can see the draw of the expensive bridles. My first Aramas was only $160. I bought a second at $250-ish because it is just that nice. The quality of the leather on a nice bridle is just amazing and the feeling/look is hard to duplicate.

    That said, you have to buy what works for you. Feeling put out when having to replace the bridle or part of it is a higher value to you than wonderful, soft, supple, gorgeous leather...is absolutely valid. I doubt I will ever be able to be that practical again...and I didn't even spend that much.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2006
    Location
    the big city
    Posts
    100

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    I have a bridle that I got for like $100 that I've had for about 8 years. Its beginning to look a little ratty, but with daily cleanings after I ride, it's still nice enough to show in. Plus, the reins are so soft and supple!



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