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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2009
    Posts
    55

    Default How long do your bridles last?

    Just out of curiosity- how long, on average, do you expect a bridle to last, either for schooling or show?

    I recently realized that I've had my Wellington bridle from Dover for about 10 years. It's still in working condition, just not as pretty as it once was. I'm considering an upgrade but not sure it's justified since my horse is young and not showing yet.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2000
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    5,526

    Default

    Until they go out of style. I've had my raised fancy stitched non padded edgewood since 95. It is in perfect condition, only used at shows and cleaned every time I use it. But, it's not in style anymore, so it's been downgraded to a second show bridle if a different bit is needed.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,321

    Default

    I have had one of my bridles for 6 years and it has been used pretty much on a daily basis and will probably last a few more years. I am not even sure what brand it is. I bought it at a local tack show.
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the
    inside of a man.

    -Sir Winston Churchill



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    5,426

    Default

    Well I'm still using one (actually part of one) that I won 15 yrs ago!! Just for schooling on my youngster, I've pieced together a couple of different parts that are still in really good condition. I have gone and got a really nice new one for when he starts to show, but until then, the old "ones" it is!

    Whenever I've had a bridle break (generally from me going over the head) I will save the good pieces and then compile them into one new bridle (as long as they all seem to match) and I then use that one as my spare.
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    Englandshire
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Ive got a couple I've had that have been in use for 25 years or so, still look pretty good. Others I've had maybe 5-10 years. My good show bridles range from 6 - 1 year old.
    I've got an old double I use that was a military bridle from WW2, still serviceable but not so pretty anymore

    I always think a new bridle is justified I've got a bit of a thing about bridles


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2000
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    I have a India-made headstall bought for $20 in 1986 (it was a complete bridle + reins at that time) still in everyday use. I did have to replace the cavesson at some point about a decade ago. I can't remember what happened to it, but I would've fixed it if I could, so it must've been fatal.

    I take care of my leather goods. I expect them to last a long, long time.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eclipse View Post
    Whenever I've had a bridle break (generally from me going over the head) I will save the good pieces and then compile them into one new bridle (as long as they all seem to match) and I then use that one as my spare.
    I do that too - I have several Frankenstein bridles!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2000
    Posts
    3,149

    Default

    If you invest in really good strap goods and take good care of them, barring breakage from accidents, they usually last a LONG time.

    My flat hunting bridle is 30+ years old. I've got a plain raised that is 20 yrs. old; a fancy stitched that is 18 yrs old.

    There were several really nice bridles I sold b/c they went out of style...anyone remember the braided browband & caveson look? or the whole rolled trend?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    Englandshire
    Posts
    600

    Default

    I thought the rolled stuff was horrible, glad that mostly went away. The braided browband is coming back over here though, for some types. Not my cup of tea really. I did have a plaited noseband/browband one though when I was a kid, the plaited inset was blue. Looking back..ewww.

    Most of my bridles are plain hunter bridles (UK hunter, not USA hunter) and they don't really go out of fashion as they aren't really fashion led, they are traditional styling.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    4,181

    Default

    Braided are coming back? Yay, I can kick off the dust and start using one again. What goes around comes around. Keep things long enough you just might get to use them again. Come on full chaps!!
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,287

    Default

    I remember when having a rolled bridle was the ultimate. Never got one, though.

    My current bridle, a Crosby USET plain raised bridle, I bought used in 1979. It is still my regular bridle. Of course, it was in storage for a looong time, but it looks nice; the leather has a beautiful finish, and the cheekpieces and original dropped noseband it came with are lined as well as raised. It's a bit out of fashion, but I do not care.

    I did have to find a nice used cavesson to match. It didn't come with reins. The original orange rubber reins I bought to use with it aren't in good shape (the rubber has flaked off), and I use a set of Bobby's raised plaited reins with it now.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  12. #12

    Default

    I have a flat sewn in bridle that's easily 60 years old.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2013
    Posts
    342

    Default

    My current bridle is also a Crosby but a raised fancy stitch. I got it around 1985, it still looks beautiful. I had to get new reins when my filly bucked so hard that she snapped my reins!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,287

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    I have a flat sewn in bridle that's easily 60 years old.
    You win!
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,697

    Default

    My oldest bridle was bought with painstakingly saved allowance money 33 years ago. Other than a couple of chew marks on the throatlatch, there's nothing wrong with it.

    Even the crappy india leather bridle that's over 25 years old is still usable.

    If it's stored properly and cared for, it should last indefinitely.

    But, OP, that doesn't mean you can't buy a new bridle if that's what you want. Those certainly weren't the last bridles I bought. And it's always nice to have two, especially so that you can swap in a clean bridle for a special occasion without having to clean tack the night before.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2002
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    16,313

    Default

    Barring a horse accident (stepping on reins, chewing on reins etc.) I have never had a good quality bridle wear out.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    238

    Default

    I have 8 bridles that all range from >1 year old to way over 16 years old. The oldest one is a no-name brand that was my first bridle for my first pony! The rest are Red Barns, a Hadfield's, a Five Star Tack, a Rodrigo, and my personal favorite- a flat/wide hunt bridle made by Bartville Harness. All are used regularly and cared for regularly.

    As long as you don't have any mishaps with the horse, your bridles should last you quite some time. Clean them regularly, condition on occasion, oil as needed, store them properly when not in use, and they should last!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,140

    Default

    I have never had a bridle become unusable. I do like to buy new bridles, so I only use them for a few years then move on but they are still in 'like new' shape after a few years and could last for years and years.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,271

    Default

    My oldest bridle (in daily use) is over 50 years old. It came, well used, with a horse we bought in 1965.

    My newest bridle is about 10 years old.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,690

    Default

    I have quite a few bridles that are still in good condition. I have my gelding's (who has passed away) cleaned and packed away. My mare has her first bridle which was kind of inexpensive that still is usable for schooling.(rarely use it though it has a bit on it and is ready if needed). She has her good Edgewood that she has had since she was around 3 yo(she's 19 this year). It is only used for showing and then cleaned each time. Her everyday bridle is an inexpensive western bridle with her hackamore on it that is several years old. I think a bridle can last pretty long if it is well taken care of.



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