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  1. #61
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    You might all be surprised to hear that some retirement homes for horses do above ground composting for the horses that are put down. How do I know? Because I visited one a few years ago and the owner told us that that was what they did. Most of the horses are euthanised and left to compost above ground. In fact they stated that Bald Eagles regularly frequent the farm looking for the dead horses.

    This was not a terrible place either. Also, you can look up Humane Horse Remains Disposal and read state laws regarding proper disposal which in most cases the responsibility lies on the owner it seems. Burial is one of the choices, but must be done in 2 days in most cases, this includes natural death or otherwise.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  2. #62
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    You might all be surprised to hear that some retirement homes for horses do above ground composting for the horses that are put down.
    Above ground composting can be done with out putting other animals at risk.

    http://compost.css.cornell.edu/naturalrenderingFS.pdf



  3. #63
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Above ground composting can be done with out putting other animals at risk.

    http://compost.css.cornell.edu/naturalrenderingFS.pdf
    Cornell with a sense of humor, look at the cartoons.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Cornell with a sense of humor, look at the cartoons.
    I know, I love the cartoons. They most certainly hired someone who had fun with that part of the brochure.



  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Above ground composting can be done with out putting other animals at risk.

    http://compost.css.cornell.edu/naturalrenderingFS.pdf
    Yes, but this place was just leaving the carcass out in the open to rot having been euthanized with chemicals.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  6. #66
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    Jun. 3, 2012
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    Louisa County, Virginia
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    Lori B,

    You are surely right that buckshot is the bigger culprit, particularly compared to the single bullet in a horse killed in this manner and then buried. But, even lead bullets can sicken birds, which are really sensitive to all kinds of chemicals. From the local wildlife center's website (wildlifecenter.org):

    Turkey Vultures, like other scavenging birds, have also been greatly impacted by lead toxicity – most commonly from eating the flesh of animal that contains lead. If a hunter shoots an animal with lead bullets or buckshot, and fails to properly remove or cover the carcass, it is possible that scavengers such as vultures and eagles will consume the contaminated meat and suffer from severe illness or death.


    ...of course, there are unfortunately plenty of other human sources of lead and crappy chemicals besides just bullets and buckshot. Hope these guys recover.



  7. #67
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    Feb. 25, 2012
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    Montana
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    Wow, sad story. Our horses are buried - all coordinated with backhoe guy - vet was there but not becaue he had to be.

    I am going to follow up on whether or not there are some birds that don't make it, as my husband for sure will use an eagle wing in ceremonies. They are hard to come by though,for good and obvious reasons, but it ensures that spirit will endure.



  8. #68
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    Mar. 10, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I know, I love the cartoons. They most certainly hired someone who had fun with that part of the brochure.
    And yikes, it makes sense, but I didn't know that decomposing ruminants will explode unless the rumen is pierced to allow gas to escape.



  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mara View Post
    And yikes, it makes sense, but I didn't know that decomposing ruminants will explode unless the rumen is pierced to allow gas to escape.
    I know, right!

    (and I dare not ask how they fond out either)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  10. #70
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    I talked with a woman from Cornell about this procedure one year at Empire Farm days (and dug in a pile of mulch that they had composted a few calves in). I do not know about any explosions or anything but I do know they did a bunch of experiments to determine what worked the best.



  11. #71
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    then again...it might be interesting to watch the video of the explosion...like the deal with the whale they blew up

    I know, I know...I am odd...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #72
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    ROFL

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    then again...it might be interesting to watch the video of the explosion...like the deal with the whale they blew up

    I know, I know...I am odd...



  13. #73
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Rendering is not an acceptable way to dispose of a pentobarbital-tainted carcass. The drug residues are not destroyed in the rendering process, so the tissues and by-products may contain poison and must not be used for animal feed.


    http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/poison.pdf.



    Euthanasia methods such as gunshot or
    penetrating captive bolt have been used on free-ranging wildlife by specially trained personnel in cases where burial or other methods of disposal were unavailable. While pentobarbital injection is generally the preferred method of humane euthanasia, there are some instances involving field euthanasia of
    wildlife by law enforcement or other wildlife professionals in which the carcass
    must be left exposed in the field (e.g. when frozen ground prevents burial).
    According to the AVMA Panel on Euthanasia1, in these situations “...a gunshot to
    the head, penetrating captive bolt, or injectable agents that are non-toxic
    (potassium chloride in combination with a non-toxic general anesthetic) should
    be used so that the potential for scavenger or predator toxicity is lessened.” While
    a discussion of these alternate methods is beyond the scope of this fact sheet, it
    must be emphasized that they are last resort procedures restricted to use by
    trained, authorized personnel, where no other options are available.



  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    What the fruitbat? "What about the vet?"?? It's not the vet's job to bury horses. No vet I've known sticks around until the backhoe gets there, and they most certainly aren't required to. Owner says they'll take care of it and you want the vet to drive back onto the property, uninvited, to inspect? You have a strange idea of what doctors do.
    I was very surprised to discover the vet can be held accountable accoridng to the link I provided on my previous post. It IS their responsibility to inform the owner of the horse and the carcass should be tagged as poisoned.



  15. #75
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    According to a friend of mine who called the vet out to attend a mare who turned out to have a broken scapula, once he involved the vet he couldn't shoot the horse, he had to have the vet use the poisonous solution. I don't understand why he couldn't send the vet off and then euth by gunshot, but that is the story.
    That's strange, especially considering the vets around my neighborhood use gunshot by preference (but will do chemical if the owner insists)



  16. #76
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Composting of large animal mortalities is a science; and you have to do it right. We are going to see more composting of dead livestock; on working farms as well as horse farms.

    But it MUST be done correctly or it is an absolutely gruesome health and environmental disaster. If you saw a farm that utilized that method, you can be sure they worked with the extension or another entity to build it correctly.

    Done correctly, it is safe and effective and the resulting compost is as safe as composted plant matter.

    Whales have been successfully composted, somewhere on the net there is a photo of the method and the result.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    You might all be surprised to hear that some retirement homes for horses do above ground composting for the horses that are put down. How do I know? Because I visited one a few years ago and the owner told us that that was what they did. Most of the horses are euthanised and left to compost above ground. In fact they stated that Bald Eagles regularly frequent the farm looking for the dead horses.
    .
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  17. #77
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    May. 21, 2012
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    I'd like to know more about rendering / chemical euth.

    Fairfax says you can't render a chemically euthed horse.

    Hmm. Either the rendering plant is doing something really unethical or impossible... or the rendering plant is using their truck and winch to offer a sideline disposal service that isn't rendering. Twice I have had the vet out to put down a horse, and both were removed from my farm within an hour by a rendering truck for a substantial fee.

    There was no deception about how the horses died- the rendering company knew to work their timing with the vet.

    I have long wondered how the plant deals with the tainted carcassed vs those of animals who die without the chemicals. I always assumed that the high cost of removing a dead horse vs. the "downer cow" ad was not a "luxury tax" imposed on us 1%er horse owners... rather it was a practical price reflecting the fact that the downer cow could be rendered into a more profitable substance while the tainted horse carcass had to be treated in a way where it either A: yielded a material of little resale value or B: required a more lengthy or expensive process to manage the contamination.



  18. #78
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plainandtall View Post
    I'd like to know more about rendering / chemical euth.

    Fairfax says you can't render a chemically euthed horse.

    Hmm. Either the rendering plant is doing something really unethical or impossible... or the rendering plant is using their truck and winch to offer a sideline disposal service that isn't rendering. Twice I have had the vet out to put down a horse, and both were removed from my farm within an hour by a rendering truck for a substantial fee.

    There was no deception about how the horses died- the rendering company knew to work their timing with the vet.

    I have long wondered how the plant deals with the tainted carcassed vs those of animals who die without the chemicals. I always assumed that the high cost of removing a dead horse vs. the "downer cow" ad was not a "luxury tax" imposed on us 1%er horse owners... rather it was a practical price reflecting the fact that the downer cow could be rendered into a more profitable substance while the tainted horse carcass had to be treated in a way where it either A: yielded a material of little resale value or B: required a more lengthy or expensive process to manage the contamination.
    well, the chemically euthanized horse cannot be used to make pet food.

    but there is still fertilizer....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  19. #79
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    Jul. 14, 2000
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    midwest
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    Rendering is not an acceptable way to dispose of a pentobarbital-tainted carcass. The drug residues are not destroyed in the rendering process, so the tissues and by-products may contain poison and must not be used for animal feed.


    http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/poison.pdf.



    Euthanasia methods such as gunshot or
    penetrating captive bolt have been used on free-ranging wildlife by specially trained personnel in cases where burial or other methods of disposal were unavailable. While pentobarbital injection is generally the preferred method of humane euthanasia, there are some instances involving field euthanasia of
    wildlife by law enforcement or other wildlife professionals in which the carcass
    must be left exposed in the field (e.g. when frozen ground prevents burial).
    According to the AVMA Panel on Euthanasia1, in these situations “...a gunshot to
    the head, penetrating captive bolt, or injectable agents that are non-toxic
    (potassium chloride in combination with a non-toxic general anesthetic) should
    be used so that the potential for scavenger or predator toxicity is lessened.” While
    a discussion of these alternate methods is beyond the scope of this fact sheet, it
    must be emphasized that they are last resort procedures restricted to use by
    trained, authorized personnel, where no other options are available.
    That depends on how the plant uses the carcasses. In Kansas, at this time, the company still picks up cattle (over 2 years old) and horses who have been chemically euthanized. The biggest change is the route, they no longer provide same day pick up so a horse/cow that has an unplanned death will be on the property for 2 or 3 days. Otherwise, you schedule the euthanasia with the company and vet for same day pick up.



  20. #80
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    http://tdn.com/news/local/authoritie...9bb2963f4.html

    That article has a bit more information. Says the owner of the horses had no idea that the bodies could be harmful and that the backhoe she had scheduled to bury the horses broke down.



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