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  1. #1
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    Default Seven Bald Eagles Near Death After Eating Dead Horses

    News video at the link. Appears the horses were euthanized but not properly disposed of. Since the eagles are a protected species, the horse owner could face jail time and fines.


    http://www.ksn.com/content/news/also...1OSxRx_5g.cspx
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier



  2. #2
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    The story states:
    the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Full text:
    SEATTLE, Washington (KING) -- Sharon Thomas couldn't believe what she saw when she took a walk on her property near Winlock, Washington last Friday.

    "I got the binoculars, was unable to tell what it was,' she said. She found one of what turned out to be seven beautiful bald eagles all near death. "We didn't realize what the culprit was, why they were so sick," she said. "It was heart wrenching, wanting them to open their eyes and stay breathing so we could get them to the people who could help us."

    A worker with Raindancer Wild Bird Rescue in Olympia brought the eagles to West Sound Wildlife Center, where a team of 15 volunteers have been working on the birds for days. They were all in critical condition. Some of the eagles were vomiting and convulsing while the most critical were unconscious and unresponsive. The volunteer vets managed to save all of the birds at least for now.

    "It's miraculous that they're even here," said Dr. Alicia Bye.

    "Miraclulous" because the eagles had likely eaten enough poison to kill a horse.

    Workers at West Sound Wildlife Center believe the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Just a few more bites would've killed the eagles, said Dr. Bye, and other animals, as well. “All animals will scavenge. That includes your dog, my dog, cats and birds of prey.”

    Two of the birds remain in critical condition. One is still unable to stand. They are all quite young, just two or three years old. They don't even have the telltale white feathers on their heads yet.

    “What’s so sad is that this was completely avoidable,” said Mike Pratt, the Shelter’s director of wildlife services.

    Because bald eagles are a protected species, federal wildlife authorities are now investigating this case. If a horse owner is responsible for the birds getting sick he could face a year in jail and a $100,000 fine.

    Two of the birds are recovering well and could be released within the next 48 hours. Others, however, are given about a 50-50 chance of survival.

    “We could've lost them all,” said Sharon Thomas. “And who's to say how many more have been affected?”



  3. #3
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    Default

    Interesting, I was unaware the eagles would eat carrion unless starving if at all. Any dead coyotes or other varmints that may have visited the buffet?
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


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  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Justa Bob View Post
    The story states:
    the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Full text:
    SEATTLE, Washington (KING) -- Sharon Thomas couldn't believe what she saw when she took a walk on her property near Winlock, Washington last Friday.

    "I got the binoculars, was unable to tell what it was,' she said. She found one of what turned out to be seven beautiful bald eagles all near death. "We didn't realize what the culprit was, why they were so sick," she said. "It was heart wrenching, wanting them to open their eyes and stay breathing so we could get them to the people who could help us."

    A worker with Raindancer Wild Bird Rescue in Olympia brought the eagles to West Sound Wildlife Center, where a team of 15 volunteers have been working on the birds for days. They were all in critical condition. Some of the eagles were vomiting and convulsing while the most critical were unconscious and unresponsive. The volunteer vets managed to save all of the birds at least for now.

    "It's miraculous that they're even here," said Dr. Alicia Bye.

    "Miraclulous" because the eagles had likely eaten enough poison to kill a horse.

    Workers at West Sound Wildlife Center believe the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Just a few more bites would've killed the eagles, said Dr. Bye, and other animals, as well. “All animals will scavenge. That includes your dog, my dog, cats and birds of prey.”

    Two of the birds remain in critical condition. One is still unable to stand. They are all quite young, just two or three years old. They don't even have the telltale white feathers on their heads yet.

    “What’s so sad is that this was completely avoidable,” said Mike Pratt, the Shelter’s director of wildlife services.

    Because bald eagles are a protected species, federal wildlife authorities are now investigating this case. If a horse owner is responsible for the birds getting sick he could face a year in jail and a $100,000 fine.

    Two of the birds are recovering well and could be released within the next 48 hours. Others, however, are given about a 50-50 chance of survival.

    “We could've lost them all,” said Sharon Thomas. “And who's to say how many more have been affected?”
    It is probably the highest charge they can throw at the people.
    aside from all the other environmental charges and sanitation.....

    good grief, how dumb can one be?!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Oh yeah, there is the responsible horse owner. Why the hell were they not picked up.
    I hope the heck they do fine the hell out of that owner.
    Praying for the rest of the magnificent birds!
    Cannot help but wonder if a Vet put the horses down. But most vets I think assume the horse owner will bury the animals or have them hauled away.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  6. #6
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    the owner of the horses might face charges,

    what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

    As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Bald eagles are scavengers. The horses should have been buried; I'm surprised the vet didn't make sure of that.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    the owner of the horses might face charges,

    what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

    As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    Bald eagles are scavengers. The horses should have been buried; I'm surprised the vet didn't make sure of that.
    Vets where you two live must be very different than any vet I have encountered. The vets job includes putting the animal down. Past that it is the owner's job. The vet does not hang out and make sure you have dug a hole or that the rendering company shows up three days later.

    It is crazy to blame the vet.


    38 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Yo, chill. I said I was surprised that the vet didn't make sure. I didn't say blame the vet.

    Where I live there are bajillions of bald eagles and coyotes and neighbor dogs running wild and it's extremely common knowledge that you don't leave out a carcass that was euthanized with pheno. HENCE, my SUPRISE.

    The vets I worked for here took their horse carcasses to the dump where they were promptly bulldozed under ground so the flying rats couldn't eat them.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    the owner of the horses might face charges,

    what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

    As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
    I just edited to wonder about that as you were posting.
    I am giving the Vet the benefit of the doubt, but who knows.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  11. #11
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    It isn't a vet's responsibility to make sure the human disposes of the carcass correctly.
    I will agree to a vet having the responsibility to tell the owner how to safely handle the remains and why, but not the vet having to ensure that was done.
    And we all know not everyone will do what they've been told to do, even if it involves safety. And especially if it involves extra work or cash.

    And when they find this owner...I hope to hell they form a line for people to slap the crap out of them. Hard.
    As horrible as it is for those poor, nationally protected birds...tons of people taking the easy way out of remains disposal on ANY animal filled with deadly chemicals don't realize just how far that reaches.
    Even the insects from the carcass will pass the poison along, enough to kill the next animal despite the small amount. And it's a s-l-o-w horrible death when ingested in small amounts.
    And worse when it's a predator/scavenger that will then die and pass it along to the next which will die and pass it along to the next....
    A single *cat* not wrapped and buried deep enough away from water (above and underground) can cause a chain reaction in an ecosystem and almost completely unbalance it in a dangerous way.

    Those eagles...one bite would have killed them. It's not an issue of "one more bite and they'd be dead"...they mean "one more bite and we couldn't have saved them." But a single bite, without intervension by humans, would have killed the birds. Hope like hell they've located the equine remains and made them safe. And that they find that owner! WTF??? Dumbass!

    Don't mean to get frothy...but damn people...this is why so many of us constantly lecture about proper euthanasia and more importantly...disposal! So the few that will do the whole "rolly eyes, you're overreacting" shitck and think they can bury any chemical-filled remains anywhere and anyway they want...please reconsider!!!!!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    5 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

    page 16 and 17

    re the first paragraph, the vet is, in part responsible
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  13. #13
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    NOBODY IS BLAMING THE VET. well, *I* wasn't blaming the vet, I said I was surprised. But maybe the vet IS to blame!

    I just think most vets would make it clear that you can't just leave the carcass out. And maybe this vet did and the land owner totally ignored.

    From:http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

    ""Serious repercussions
    may occur when veterinary health professionals who
    should be well-informed about the necessity for proper
    disposal of animal remains fail to provide it, or fail to
    inform their clients how to provide it, whether there
    was intent to cause harm or not.138,139 C""

    Winlock, WA ordinance says the land/animal owner is responsible for the disposal.

    http://www.winlockwa.govoffice2.com/...47BE013%7D.PDF
    Last edited by cowboymom; Mar. 26, 2013 at 12:48 PM.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

    page 16 and 17

    re the first paragraph, the vet is, in part responsible
    I do not see how that says the vet is responsible for an idiot who does not follow thru.


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  15. #15
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    No one established that the vet made effort to inform the owner

    until then, vet is , in part responsible. I wonder if the juornalist will follow through. Given the journalism standards of the common day media in the immediate area, I will wait for "the stranger" to follow through.

    The vet knew that the property contained a large load of toxin, follow through would appear to be the prudent thing.
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    what about the vet who contributed to this debacle
    the vet would not be responsible for disposal of the carcass(es).


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoopoe View Post
    No one established that the vet made effort to inform the owner
    I do not think we have even established a hint of who owned the horses so making the leap that the vet did anything wrong is pretty darn huge.

    I see you want to blame the vet, so continue on doing so. God forbid the horse owner be responsible for their own critters or anything. Clearly it has to be the fault of someone else.


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  18. #18
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    Umm... sounds like you have an ax to grind. You're leaping to conclusions worse than anyone else on this thread.



  19. #19
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    Chances are that the carcass is still poisoning wildlife.

    Which means there are other suffering animals out there, who will probably die unnoticed.

    Disposal of large animal mortalities is becoming increasingly regulated; and in some parts of the US you CANNOT dispose of a mortality on site.

    Horse owners need to get up to speed on this subject, because our horses will die someday. Often that death is unplanned. We all need to know who to contact for disposal, we need to know the laws and regs in our state and locality, and we need to know all that now. Not when we're holding the lead line and weeping because our horse is about to die.

    Vets can help educate horse owners about disposal, but the owner has to have a good plan in place before the worst happens.

    A euthanized animal (pet or livestock) is nothing but poison. Lethal poison that can contaminate groundwater and kill pets and wildlife that come into contact with it. By the time you find the poisoned animal - it's often too late to save him.

    I hope the Eagles recover, and I fervently hope that contaminated carcass has since been disposed of properly.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


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  20. #20
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    Bald eagles are opportunistic scavengers -- in fact, I've always thought it quite amusing that they became our national bird as they prefer to either (a) eat trash or (b) beat up other birds and take their food. Oh, biological irony...

    They are a protected species but are definitely very numerous both in the Pacific NW and down here in our river corridors. Heck, we have a pair living in the backyard of the office here in town, LOL. So it is unlikely that the owner will receive the highest penalty available. Not that it is ok to harm wildlife just because they are not critically endangered -- it is never ok to harm ANY native wildlife through negligence or otherwise.

    The owner will not be eligible for federal prosecution by USFWS unless they knowingly harmed the birds. If you harm protected species by accident and you report it, you will not get in trouble. However, since it sounds like the neighbour reported it, the owner may get a hand slap, although I rather doubt it as it can take some doing to get that particular agency to bring forward meaningful charges, especially in small scale case like this.

    It is extremely irresponsible to not properly dispose of the euthanized body and that they definitely should see additional repercussions for. Leaving out a poisoned corpse is wrong in many, many ways.


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