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  1. #21
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    usa
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    A couple of comments, imho this horse tends to take a 'long spot', hence be flatter. The fences are small, and for some horses they do not care. And the bascule has to be more clearly allowed (from a better approach, more tact and timing is remaining connection). Proper balance/reactions in flat work are very important to how the horse jumps. Imho better lateral flexibility (difference between lateral flexion and actual bend through body), and ability to seek the hand on the flat, and use more caveletti with jumps with properly set poles, perhaps rising triple bars, and concentration on the equitation (development of automatic release) will all help.
    I.D.E.A. yoda


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  2. #22
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    May. 23, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ideayoda View Post
    concentration on the equitation (development of automatic release) will all help.
    Thank you. I forget to do it sometimes on him I thought I was in the in and out but I was concentrating too hard on the landing lead



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
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    7,261

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    I don't think his canter is that bad, OP, just a little green. He's stiff but he's young and a little weak (you lost his hind end for a stride here and there which to me screams out of shape, I would work on fitness/stifles before jumping him a lot).

    Nor do I think his jump is bad or anything to worry about. Just keep working on his flatwork and don't obsess over perfect knees. Quite like the horse, he seems sensible and like he's trying. I bet he'll sharpen up at 3'6, wouldn't expect him to try much more before that. He doesn't need to.



  4. #24
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    just to be clear...I didn't think he was bad either. Just green. The stronger his canter and balance get, the jump will be there.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    7,714

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    Quote Originally Posted by ideayoda View Post
    Proper balance/reactions in flat work are very important to how the horse jumps. Imho better lateral flexibility (difference between lateral flexion and actual bend through body), and ability to seek the hand on the flat, and use more caveletti with jumps with properly set poles, perhaps rising triple bars, and concentration on the equitation (development of automatic release) will all help.
    yoda is much more tactful with words than I am.
    It's a Jersey thing. (can I claim Jersey on a horsie BB?)
    You would think living in TX I would learn how to be sweet...

    Hey now, you are your horse's advocate. We welcome you protecting him. : )

    I am a little stumped though. If he is very very nice on the flat...why not expect the same thing from him over fences?

    For instance, that bottom half of the arena where he cantered on the wrong lead and leaned in so badly through the entire corner. Don't let him do that. Sounds simple right? It is. Just don't let him do it. Stop. Reposition and then continue in a correct balance. or, shoot, if he landed and barfed all over me like that, and then proceeded through the corner stiff and on the wrong lead I would do something like: stop as soon as he barfs. halt. rein back, proceed in shoulder in and then pick up the canter again, make sure he is going well enough on my aids (by circling as many times as needed) that I can leave him alone and then go to the next fence.

    I think it's more simple than we as riders often make it. I've always been more of an outside of the box and different thinker.
    For instance, what if rather than thinking, balance, transitions, softeness...blah blah blah.
    Just try to think about not letting him be out of balance. Not letting him barf on you. Not letting him be stiff in the corners.
    He is a big guy. And you are small.
    I think sometimes a "hey, don't do that" quick check and done with it is much more useful than a "please try to be balanced" half halt-half halt-half halt.
    One correction is very well noticed and understood, and the other may be adding an element for him to lean on further...

    just a thought...
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  6. #26
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    May. 23, 2012
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    Hahaha. Love it. Yes, I think that's why he is good at home: because when he "barfs" (love that ) on me I circle and/or do whatever I have to to make him pay attention. In a show scenario I kind of ride what I have and hope for the best. I shouldn't do that. I should expect more of him and stop him if I have to- point of it all being to focus on him as opposed to focusing on being disqualified. Don't get me wrong, he isn't always lovely, he can drag and be a total pain in the ass, its more that he CAN be lovely and I CAN make him lovely... Back to work I need a good kick in the breeches sometimes to help me understand what he's allowed to pull.



  7. #27
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by IterAndEra View Post
    Hahaha. Love it. Yes, I think that's why he is good at home: because when he "barfs" (love that ) on me I circle and/or do whatever I have to to make him pay attention. In a show scenario I kind of ride what I have and hope for the best. I shouldn't do that. I should expect more of him and stop him if I have to- point of it all being to focus on him as opposed to focusing on being disqualified. Don't get me wrong, he isn't always lovely, he can drag and be a total pain in the ass, its more that he CAN be lovely and I CAN make him lovely... Back to work I need a good kick in the breeches sometimes to help me understand what he's allowed to pull.
    At a show...they barf...and you pull them up to a trot. I've trotted fences even at Training level. No, it isn't ideal but it is better than coming to the fence out of balance. But it is harder for us as riders to slow our own minds down and ride. When things start to go south...most of us panic a bit. Perfectly normal for both horse and rider
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



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