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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    Well he was just about sound at the walk tonight, still dead lame at the trot. He's started doing this thing at the walk where he basically flings his entire right leg out and lands flat footed or toe first on that leg. I noticed it yesterday and thought it was just part of him being lame, but it was there again tonight.
    . . .
    What you are describing sounds like foot flutter lameness. It results from pressure on the circumflex nerve that runs directly below the tip of the coffin bone. The nerve impulse to the horse feels similar to what you would feel when you hit your funny bone. The effect is a knee jerk reaction - literally. Usually there is enough thickness to the sole under the tip of the coffin bone that the circumflex nerve is well protected - that is unless someone removes that protection with a hoof knife.

    Adjacent to the circumflex nerve is the circumflex vein and artery, which provide circulation to the lamina. When the sole is thinned across the toe, these structures are easily damaged - which can result in circulation problems for the lamina and result in an inflammatory response known as "laminitis."

    Wish there were more good farriers in my area. There sure seem to be a lot of bad ones.
    Follow the money. Good farriers tend to gravitate toward demographic areas where their substantial investment in education is rewarded.

    And overall I am just tired of all the drama that seems to surround horses and horse people.
    The drama has nothing to do with horses.



  2. #42
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    So is this something that will go away once the sole is back to normal? Is there any perminant damage I should be concerned with? The first couple if days his feet were HOT to the touch. Bute seemed to help with that a lot. Last night they were back to cool. However I think I may have felt a pulse at the fetlock. Would feel it, check a min later and not feel it.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  3. #43
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Cullowhere?, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    What you are describing sounds like foot flutter lameness. It results from pressure on the circumflex nerve that runs directly below the tip of the coffin bone. The nerve impulse to the horse feels similar to what you would feel when you hit your funny bone. The effect is a knee jerk reaction - literally. Usually there is enough thickness to the sole under the tip of the coffin bone that the circumflex nerve is well protected - that is unless someone removes that protection with a hoof knife.
    Tom--when you say a "knee jerk" reaction, can this include a jerky backward motion when you release the foot back to the ground (say, after picking out the hoof or other reason to hold the hoof up)?
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  4. #44
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    Feb. 19, 2013
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    Alabama
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    WAIT-I'm wrong, I am thinking of venice turpentine instead of iodine.
    This. My mare was sore this summer because of the hard dry ground (think rocked back on her front feet like founder). Farrier put turpentine on her soles once and I haven't had an issue out of her since.



  5. #45
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by monstrpony View Post
    Tom--when you say a "knee jerk" reaction, can this include a jerky backward motion when you release the foot back to the ground (say, after picking out the hoof or other reason to hold the hoof up)?
    No. Completely different situation.



  6. #46
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    So is this something that will go away once the sole is back to normal?
    Assuming it is allowed to get back to normal and not "normally" trimmed that way, you can expect a full recovery after a few months. Durasole is your friend.


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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by monstrpony View Post
    Tom--when you say a "knee jerk" reaction, can this include a jerky backward motion when you release the foot back to the ground (say, after picking out the hoof or other reason to hold the hoof up)?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    No. Completely different situation.
    Do you know any possible causes of this? It's not that he jerks the foot away, but when it is released, there is a very fast jerk of the leg backward, toward the hind leg. Seems more like a reflex than anything intentional. Some people just shrug, a couple have said they thought it was something in the shoulder (including vets, farriers, and otherwise knowledgeable horsemen).
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  8. #48
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    Michigan
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    Still lame as lame can be 11 days later. Put an epsom salt poultice on him last night and wrapped both feet in a diaper just in case it is in fact an abscess. Also going to start buting him at night so that he can hopefully be a little more comfortable while standing in his stall which is mats over concrete. Also going to buy extra shavings to hopefully make it softer.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  9. #49
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    And your farrier still has done nothing to rectify the situation? You need a different farrier, and sooner rather than later. At a minimum, you should consider using The Stysrofoam Protocol http://www.hopeforsoundness.com/cms/...tructions.html And you don't have to use their styrofoam blocks. Simply go to Home Depot or the like and buy a sheet of the thickest styrofoam(solid, not granulated), usually its 2" thick, and cut pieces yourself. And use Gorilla Tape instead of Duct Tape. Or, get someone who knows how to apply hoof casting material with or without supplemental orthosis. There is also the Sigafoos glue-on cuffs/shoes solution http://www.soundhorse.com/. And, the Soft-Ride boot option http://www.softrideboots.com/Default.asp

    Whatever you decide to do, you need to do it sooner rather than later, and IMNTBCHO, its already later.


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  10. #50
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Eleven days with sore feet? Have you had the vet out? That's a disaster just waiting to happen, if it hasn't already.

    Correct me if I'm wrong Rick. If he were mine, the vet would have already been out for xrays. But, since that didn't happen, Magic Cushion or Styrofoam or both, deep, deep bedding and vet ASAP.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
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    As noted, you are correct.


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  12. #52
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    Vet is being called in the morning. Problem is tonight his feet were cold and he appeared relatively sound at the walk on concrete. I didn't trot him though.The reason the vet hasn't been called yet is because one day he will appear totally normal and then the next day he will be dead lame. Have been yo-yoing like this for the past week.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    Vet is being called in the morning.
    'bout time.. Make sure he brings his x-ray machine with him and gets some rads of those feet.
    Problem is tonight his feet were cold and he appeared relatively sound at the walk on concrete.
    What does "relatively sound" mean? Sound is as sound does..
    The reason the vet hasn't been called yet is because one day he will appear totally normal and then the next day he will be dead lame. Have been yo-yoing like this for the past week.
    That's not a reason, its an excuse. And, IMNTBCHO, a poor one at best.

    It will be interesting to see when the vet gets out to your place and what s/he has to say after evaluating your horse.


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  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    'bout time.. Make sure he brings his x-ray machine with him and gets some rads of those feet.

    What does "relatively sound" mean? Sound is as sound does..

    That's not a reason, its an excuse. And, IMNTBCHO, a poor one at best.

    It will be interesting to see when the vet gets out to your place and what s/he has to say after evaluating your horse.
    Well I have had to reschedule twice now due to the vet having emergencies to go to. He is now hopefully coming out on Tuesday.

    I guess by relatively sound I mean that he was no longer uncomfortable just being lead around the farm like he was originally, he is however still not sound enough to ride.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  15. #55
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    Dec. 2, 2009
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    Skyedragon, wish you could use mine, but he's not taking any more clients...I got damned lucky getting him (and that he is a neighbor). I feed him up a few times a year with banana muffins to keep him happy . I can give you the name of another farrier that you can try that is well liked privately and she may travel to you. Before my heart-farrier, I had one that, when I wanted to try barefoot on my mare, sored her up to prove she had "TB Feet" and could not go barefoot. Funny, she's been barefoot now for 6 years, and you know I ride hard.



  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    Well I have had to reschedule twice now due to the vet having emergencies to go to. He is now hopefully coming out on Tuesday.
    And in his absence, what have you done/are you doing?
    I guess by relatively sound I mean that he was no longer uncomfortable just being lead around the farm like he was originally, he is however still not sound enough to ride.
    Again, what are you doing to palliate his pain/discomfort?


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  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    And in his absence, what have you done/are you doing?

    Again, what are you doing to palliate his pain/discomfort?
    I have been using Durasole and bute as needed. Thursday was kind of a breakthrough day actually, he was sound at the walk and sound going to the left at the trot, going to the right he was still sore. Today he was sound walk/trot going both directions.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  18. #58
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    Glad to hear he's doing well.


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  19. #59
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    Is the fact that this horse is for sale the reason you've not aggressively paid for vet, different farrier, and soft-ride boots for treatment for him? (per your thread on boarding)

    You are not going to be able to sell a lame horse. You have to get a competent farrier and vet and get the hooves taken care of. Has he had issues with lameness before this trimming? If you don't pay now to get him sound, you're going to get stuck with more expenses.


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  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Is the fact that this horse is for sale the reason you've not aggressively paid for vet, different farrier, and soft-ride boots for treatment for him? (per your thread on boarding)

    You are not going to be able to sell a lame horse. You have to get a competent farrier and vet and get the hooves taken care of. Has he had issues with lameness before this trimming? If you don't pay now to get him sound, you're going to get stuck with more expenses.
    I had an appointment with the vet, but had to cancel twice due to him having other emergencies and me being on a time crunch. As of right now Cody is sound, so I see no need to bring a vet in at this point. He will also hopefully be sold before I have to deal with the farrier issue again.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



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