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  1. #21
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    cowboy mom- well, that's what they should do. I'm not picking on farriers. I find the same problem with most tradesmen. I think "it's a guy thing."
    Do you find it easier to get service from women?



  2. #22
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Do you find it easier to get service from women?

    Not women farriers. Of course, there are fewer women in the trades that I am talking about (plumbers, carpenters, painters. electricians, etc.) so it could have more to do with the professions than the gender. But I always assumed that it was like men asking for directions.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  3. #23
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    My GPS has a female voice. My wife refers to her as "the bitch."

    I think the American bitch is the factory default setting. I changed mine to the British woman's voice. She is MUCH more polite sounding.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    Whoa, I came on here asking about DMSO on feet, not to get jumped on.

    I called the farrier, he was already coming out to check on another horse and agreed to check mine. He said that they trotted him around the pasture and that he was perfectly sound. He admitted to trying to correct the fact that my horse is toed in. My mare was also toed in and I was always told to NOT have anybody try to correct it at that late stage of her life. At 13 I am a little surprised that he tried to fix the toeing in issue. He also said that if I have further issues that I should consult the vet. So that's that I guess.

    Tonight he was a little more willing to be lead down the concrete aisleway of the barn than last night but he is certainly not perfectly sound. At least the head bob at the walk was gone.

    And just as an aside, I thought it was usually recommended to check soundness on a hard surface like a parking lot, barn aisle, etc? At least every PPE I have had done that is how the vet has done it.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  6. #26
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Magic cushion. I swear by it. Maybe some Surpass and wrap the legs in standing wraps at night? And a little bute? Depends on how bad it is.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  7. #27
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    That was my concerns with DMSO. I was always super paranoid when I used it on my mare, but it seemed to clear up the random edemas she would get in the summer.
    I use a Furo/DMSO sweat sometimes, but I keep the leg wrapped and wash it well the next morning.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #28
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    My GPS has a female voice. My wife refers to her as "the bitch."
    Bitch...not just a word, a lifestyle.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    I agree with those who say the first thing you do when your horse turns up lame after a trim or shoeing is to call the farrier back out there.

    I also agree that you should use durasole. I was skeptical of it, since no one here uses it and since I'd had my horse on crossapol for 2 yrs. Crossapol is wonderful for soft shelly hooves and for thin soles. But it is expensive when your horse has big feet. Once I got his hoof walls and soles in good shape, I thought about trying durasole. So I asked a cother on this thread about durasole, and she said it was great. I've been using it now for almost 2 years on both my horses, the one with genetically bad hooves, and the one with good hooves.

    I also suggest buying a pair of soft ride boots. They are wonderful for any hoof issues and really do relieve pain right away.

    It's not normal to quick hooves often. The one farrier down here who quicks horses about every week will actually tell his clients that he's done it at another barn the previous day. He used to do my former BO's horses and it was painful to watch them walk off sore. Every 6 weeks. So talk to you farrier about this. Everyone can make a mistake. Well my farrier hot nailed Cloudy in 2001, so we remember that well, but a farrier shouldn't do it more than once every 10 or 12 years. (And I called and he came right back out and reset, and my horse was showing 2 days later.)



  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Know what really pisses me off? Farriers that don't return your phone call. IME, the majority of them.
    Whoa! I've only had 3 farriers in my lifetime, but all were available all the time. A good thing before shows. And I called my farrier out of the hunting field to go tend to another cother's mare, after said cother moved her mare to another barn. Returning calls is what a professional does.



  11. #31
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    Mar. 12, 2006
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    Horseshoers are a necessary evil. OP, I've heard that iodine or iodine with sugar will toughen the sole. Never tried it myself though. Hope you poor guy is feeling better.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  12. #32
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    It's a certain type of iodine that toughens the sole-Venice Iodine, not just any 7% that you have sitting around. That will only dry it out. Durasole is what we use here.

    WAIT-I'm wrong, I am thinking of venice turpentine instead of iodine. Sorry!

    So it sounds like he tweaked the angles; now he knows better.

    I always heard to trot/walk them out on a paved surface to see if it's a bone/hoof issue and grass/soft surface for muscle/ligament issues. For a post-trim check we just trot them out on a flat dry pasture or dirt driveway.



  13. #33
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    Whoa, I came on here asking about DMSO on feet, not to get jumped on.
    In the words of the great philosopher Mic Jagger, "You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need."

    Fortunately for your horse the advice you got regarding DMSO was not to use it.

    I called the farrier, he was already coming out to check on another horse and agreed to check mine. He said that they trotted him around the pasture and that he was perfectly sound. He admitted to trying to correct the fact that my horse is toed in. My mare was also toed in and I was always told to NOT have anybody try to correct it at that late stage of her life. At 13 I am a little surprised that he tried to fix the toeing in issue.
    The average epiphyseal plate closure times for the middle phalanx, proximal phalanx, and 3rd metacarpal/metatarsal happen at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. I would have serious reservations about the qualifications and competence of any farrier who would suggest they can correct a horse's limb orientation after the epiphyseal plates have closed.

    He also said that if I have further issues that I should consult the vet. So that's that I guess.
    You might want to consult the vet about the wisdom of keeping a farrier who attempted orthopedic correction on a 13 year old horse without your permission and without veterinary consultation. Anyone ignorant enough to try something so foolish is lying when he calls himself a farrier. The word farrier implies professional expertise that includes significant knowledge of anatomy and orthopedics. Perhaps that is why the trim was so cheap.

    Tonight he was a little more willing to be lead down the concrete aisleway of the barn than last night but he is certainly not perfectly sound. At least the head bob at the walk was gone.
    A competent farrier would have several options at his disposal to immediately improve your horse's comfort. An incompetent hack has excuses and ignorance.

    And just as an aside, I thought it was usually recommended to check soundness on a hard surface like a parking lot, barn aisle, etc? At least every PPE I have had done that is how the vet has done it.
    When a lameness issue is suspected in the feet, a farrier usually starts with hoof testers in order to locate sensitivity to ground force pressure on specific areas of the hoof. If the hoof testers rule out sensitivity to pressure on the hoof, then the next logical course of examination would be gait analysis on a paved surface and then on a soft surface.

    I would be surprised if anyone ignorant enough to attempt orthopedic correction on a 13 year old horse knows how to use hoof testers and even more surprised if they knew anything about gait analysis.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    I thought I had posted it here, but I guess i just said it those that PM'd me. I found an old bottle of Durasole in my first aid kit that I had forgotten about. I started him on it last night. I forgot how bad it stains though! Going to have to grab some gloves from work. He was a bit of a pain too, he doesn't want to lift his feet right now and doesn't want to hold them up for any length of time, poor baby. Usually I just have to bend over next to whatever foot and he is already lifting it up for me.

    The weird thing about this farrier is that he did an awesome job on my friend's show mare, put special shoes and pads on her and saved my friend from having to do injections this year. Mare went from gimping around to totally sound.

    I on the other hand got heck from the barn owner, barn owner's daughter, and my friend for "whining" about my horse not being sound after his trim because apparently "every horse will get lame from a trim at some point." I am sure that every horse will at some point in their life, doesn't make it any more acceptable!!! Had this happen before with a different horse, when I dared to question the farrier's work they went off on me, and then said they would no longer trim for me. Good riddens!

    And my friends wonder why I want to quit horses.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  15. #35
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    Aug. 1, 2002
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    Georgia
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    Well, it also depends on why the horse was toed in. I've seen horses who were said to be "toed in" but it was actually due to being improperly trimmed. That kind of "toed in" can be fixed, unlike a horse's God given conformation.

    As for using DMSO on ouchy feet, there's an old racetrack recipe that has it in it,and it works amazingly well. When I galloped racehorses, our vet owned several racehorses,and he used the concoction on his horses, and even recommended it to clients.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    . . .
    The weird thing about this farrier is that he did an awesome job on my friend's show mare, put special shoes and pads on her and saved my friend from having to do injections this year. Mare went from gimping around to totally sound. . .
    And despite laming your horse, he didn't offer to do that as an option to make the horse comfortable?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    And despite laming your horse, he didn't offer to do that as an option to make the horse comfortable?
    No, he did not.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  18. #38
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    The farriers on this thread are right, as usual. (Although a little egotistical.) So fire the farrier, he should have refunded your money and put shoes on your horse. And he should have owned up to laming your horse. I mean, we rely on farriers and vets to do their best. When they screw up, they should admit it and should reimburse you and make this right. And when it's something that is not his fault, the farrier should work with your vet to make the horse sound.

    Iodine will work if you run out of the durasole. You can order durasole from jeffersequine.com or other places and get it quickly. Venice turpentine will take care of some of the pain, but it stings.

    You don't have to give up on horses. You just have to find the right farrier and keep him happy. My horses put out for Xmas and his birthday, monetarily, his birthday is March 20th, btw, and give him some of their gatorade each time he comes out to shoe them. I don't quibble about cost of shoes and service. This extra effort is so that my horses don't get stuck with a farrier who is incompetent, or who quicks them. We cannot have a bad farrier. I've seen others with farriers who suck, and I don't want one of those farriers touching my 2 horses.



  19. #39
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    Well he was just about sound at the walk tonight, still dead lame at the trot. He's started doing this thing at the walk where he basically flings his entire right leg out and lands flat footed or toe first on that leg. I noticed it yesterday and thought it was just part of him being lame, but it was there again tonight.

    Wish there were more good farriers in my area. There sure seem to be a lot of bad ones.

    And overall I am just tired of all the drama that seems to surround horses and horse people.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  20. #40
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    Feb. 13, 2007
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    As far as DMSO and feet, we used it all the time when mixing up Bowie "Mud" to pack feet with. To the OP, sounds like you need a new farrier and barn to hang out in....



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