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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2006
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustJumpIt! View Post
    Never seen it, but I was taught that a black ribbon means the horse is being ridden by a member of the clergy.
    I'm wondering why I'd need to know this



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
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    MI USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Far_North_Equestrian View Post
    I'm wondering why I'd need to know this
    "Back in the day", there were a LOT of unspoken clues to folks who looked for them. Like the black whip thong. As mentioned, Clergy may hunt, but they were usually soberly dressed as suited their calling.

    I learned from UK folks that there are Hackney braids and Cleveland Bay braids, along with the more common braids seen on Hunt horses. Braid type was a sign to the Knowledgable, what they were looking at in a horse. Then they could ask the correct questions if they wanted to know more. Observer knew what breeding a horse was, by wearing those specialized braids, saved time at horse sales or competitions. Maybe other Breeds have their own braid styles too, just that I am not familiar with them.

    A lot of this came from strict Etiquette Rules, which folks tried to observe. Black armbands, BLACK GLOVES, meant that a person was in Mourning. One of the TRADITIONAL reasons horse folks NEVER wore black gloves to compete in the past. That rule has fallen aside in many kinds of riding, so your outfit matches better! But black gloves are unacceptable attire in some classes. If you wear them anyway, EVERYONE knows you don't know how to play in this class!

    Kind of like wearing a "BAD" hat in Western. A flat brim in a class is a dead giveaway that "you are not a cowboy/cowgirl" like the rest of the riders. Not talking about the flat Buckaroo hats, but badly shaped cowboy hats, straw or felt.

    GTD, thanks for the tips on DRS issues, and I WILL keep an eye out for tail POUFS of red-white-blue and streamers.

    There is a LOT of unspoken stuff going on around any kind of horse activity. Learning to read people and horses so marked, is in YOUR best interests.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    24,350

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    Quote Originally Posted by Far_North_Equestrian View Post
    I'm wondering why I'd need to know this
    What Goodhors said...
    ~Or~
    Because you REALLY don't want to cut off a clergy when riding!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  4. #24
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2006
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    237

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    I took it as a sign that we were moving on up when our master came to me at some point in our first season and said that Duffy didn't need his green ribbon anymore. He had done well!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Jun. 7, 2009
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    294

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    Maybe I'll lace in both a blue and a yellow ribbon into my new studly's tail for his first show season this year... Cover both options since both seem to be used?



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2000
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland
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    Folks, go to this link and then scroll down to the ribbon poster and the translation below it. Interesting.

    http://www.ultimatedressage.com/foru...p?f=9&t=238157
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier



  7. #27
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    Good grief! I had no idea there were any ribbons except the red one. I don't tailgate any horse because it's not nice.

    Regarding the others, an observant rider would notice if a horse were unsettled when they passed (whether green or not). You should only pass another horse walking fast or jogging slow. I always speak to the person I'm passing anyway to make sure it's alright. .

    An observant rider should also notice that gleam in the eye if a stallion takes an interest in their mare. I wonder if the other colors just cause more confusion.

    I could see their use in a big organized trail ride where the ribbon colors and their associated meanings were announced before the ride. But, really, I think I'd rather the organizers take the time to remind people of the basic rules of trail etiquette.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
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    MI USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by microbovine View Post
    Good grief! I had no idea there were any ribbons except the red one. I don't tailgate any horse because it's not nice.

    Regarding the others, an observant rider would notice if a horse were unsettled when they passed (whether green or not). You should only pass another horse walking fast or jogging slow. I always speak to the person I'm passing anyway to make sure it's alright. .

    An observant rider should also notice that gleam in the eye if a stallion takes an interest in their mare. I wonder if the other colors just cause more confusion.

    I could see their use in a big organized trail ride where the ribbon colors and their associated meanings were announced before the ride. But, really, I think I'd rather the organizers take the time to remind people of the basic rules of trail etiquette.
    Unfortunately, you are giving "the majority of group riders" a LOT more credit for observation than they deserve. The numerous examples in previous posts are a sharp reminder of the poor observation and HORSEMANSHIP skills that are so common. They are merely passengers in charge of (sorta) steering and speed of the horse they sit on. No ability to read horse language and they wouldn't put it to use if they DID observe anything that wasn't a rearing, fighting horse in front of them.

    Those folks are NOT EVER going to notice the gleam in a stallion's eyes, because they are not seeing what they look at, and probably ALREADY too close as they hurry past him! 99% of stallions used in group settings are SAINTS. They put up with incredible horse rudeness from other riders not being careful of ANY other equine, certainly not respecting of his space.

    And EVERY group ride I have attended DID hit on "Trail Etiquette" DAILY, with little improvment by that "majority of riders" again. The person deemed in charge, had to make PERSONAL visits to those folks back in camp to EXPLAIN what was meant by the Rules before it started to sink into their minds.

    Tail ribbons of ANY COLOR can be helpful because people DO ASK why horse is wearing it, so you can educate them. Not all will run into your horse to ask the question! The ribbons DO get other rider's attention FIRST, so they might even be a bit WARY in coming closer. I have seen that too, which is good.

    Wherever I ride, I try to ride defensively, just like driving a car. I leave space ahead, to the side, WARN folks behind me that we NEED the space! Carrying a dressage whip of length can help with that, as you wave it BEHIND the rump of your animal, and move off the pushy horse. Tell the rider flat out,"If I can hit your horse, you are TOO CLOSE. Ride someplace else!!" I will protect my horse if at all possible from others. I SURE don't want others getting kicked, so being rude to pushers is better for THEIR safety.

    Even the BEST horse will kick in the right conditions, and you don't want your horse MADE into a kicker by being crowded all the time from behind or getting banged into from any direction.



  9. #29
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    Jun. 20, 2005
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    833

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    To somewhat complicate matters:
    In IHSA, Red means kicker, and for the life of me I am not sure which is which but I believe Yellow means "can get quick" and green means "sticky lead" but might be vice-versa.



  10. #30
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    Mar. 15, 2013
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    83

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    so I can no longer wear a white ribbon in my hair when I am walking down the street? dang it, well during those times of the month I do need a red ribbon, although I am more of a rip your head off than a kicker. but back to the post, I was always taught red was a kicker and green or yellow could be used for stallions. Other than that the other two I have never heard of until today!



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
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    Va
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    FNE so you don't let out a stream of cuss words when your horse is being an a**...hehe.



  12. #32
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    I've only been on a few group rides. I always hold back to let the yahoos go first. I prefer to ride in back with the safer, saner folks.



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