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  1. #21
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    Feb. 26, 2011
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    In our area it is a lot of number 1, a bit of old school, this is how pappy did it, and a segment that wasn't mentioned, different standards to which certain cultures strive for in horse keeping.

    I gave up going to one of our employee's farms for pigs because he leased out "corrals" to other people and I couldn't stand the sights. There is a big auction every Wednesday in Fort Collins and some of the horses, goats, donkeys that would get picked up were unbelievable. So I would have to say in our area many of the horses I would describe as in poor condition are due to cultural differences
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  2. #22
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Around here I am surrounded by "rural" people and surrounded by more wealthy people moving into the area. There are some very nice and pricey barns around here...then you drive down the road and some people around here feel it is fine to leave horses out and feed and water when you have time...horses live in mud lots, etc. One family and those creatures left town. I still have one lonely horse in the neighborhood...she does have a shelter and is thrown hay most of the time, but her feet are scary, she is alone, in a pen, no one rides her or brushes her...ahg. She whinnies at my horses. She breaks my heart. I am sure she has never seen a vet.


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  3. #23
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    if I drive 45 minutes I'm in the heart of TB country with the fanciest farms you could ever hope to see and babies worth $50K before they hit the ground.

    But in that 45 minute drive there's more than one of the number one types, How'd Rustbreeches put it? this is how Pappy did it?

    Falling down barbed wire, the horses only stay in because they think they should. Or our one annoying neighbor with the single strand of electric, it falls down, one or the other of his scruffy beasts comes over here. I understand about paying the farrier and the vet, sometimes it's hard to come by, but grooming costs nothing - oh excuse me - $2 for a brush that'll get the shedding done. $2 and some time.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
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    3,142

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    My personal favorite is the show barn I drive by every day that puts midweight turnouts on every horse in October and takes them off in April-- some days it is 70 degrees and they look so miserable!

    But we really have a little of everything in this area, from old school farmer types to backyard minis to lame Amish buggy horses to scarily clueless rich people.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
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    965

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    Here on the coast property is outrageously priced and scarce. Most people with horses have to maintain them on exceptionally small lots which is definitely a challenge. It drives me crazy, however, when folks ride by and automatically feel sorry for horses because they are not roaming on 10 acre lots. Ask the local vet and she will tell you that many of these horses are better cared for than those at the big farms and barns.

    On the other hand, those who do not have the resources have no business trying to maintain horses in this area. One local woman has had a donkey hit by a car and a horse killed when it was hit a year or two later. She now has several new horses behind her mobile home with round bales that sit for weeks. Animal control visits but nothing ever changes.



  6. #26
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    Jan. 4, 2011
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    On a horse.
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    In Arizona, I see a lot of people who move West and get horses so they can live the "Cowboy Dream". Ugh. Many of them have no concept of horse care outside what they've seen on Bonanza. I know I'm generalizing (so I apologize), but in the past year I've been an innocent passerby who had to: 1) Get a horse unstuck from under a steel pipe fence -- poor old thing had been wedged under the SUBURBAN home's front yard fence for two hours . . . snow-bird owner thought the horse was "resting." 2) Call a vet after a newby "cowboy" owner tied his cast horse's hind legs to his ATV in an attempt to drag the cast horse out of the stall (!).

    However, I also ended up with two nice Holsteiner babies three years ago because an elderly retiree decided to move to Arizona and indulge her horse whims. She couldn't handle the colt and filly, so put them on Craigslist. SCORE


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  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    I know 4H is run on a volunteer basis. I started and ran a 4H in a very large county down south, had about 40 eager Beaver kiddos within the first year. Doesn't excuse volunteers who are willfully ignorant.

    If I don't know something, I don't pretend to know. It's just sad that so many people just make up stuff on the fly...
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Oct. 26, 2010
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    Orygun
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    We have the gamut from starving to death to fancy show barns with serious people. Pony Club is making inroads here. 4-H is iffy from what I understand and seen. I turned down a free gelding about a month ago from a 4H family that I would have been embarassed to own without putting a sign on the front fence saying I had just gotten him, that thin. Too much money into him to get him back to decent weight and shape.

    Just today, a man told me he wanted to give me 20 loaves of frozen bread for my horses....I replied my horses weren't going to eat any such bread. He said his llamas ate the stuff all the time, what's the difference? Good thing my horses are back from the front fence, no feeding over the fence!!
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


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  9. #29
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    Sep. 2, 2008
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    Greeley, Colorado
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    I'm from HHI originally so I know what OBX is

    I now live in CO in "cowboy country", right up the road from RustBreeches. I see a lot of old rancher types who take their retired horses and just put them out to pasture. The harsh winters and lack of shelter and real grain takes a big toll on them. The guys mean well but horses are livestock to them and are basically useless if they can't work anymore. It's a harsh reality for my east coast sensibilities.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate


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  10. #30
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    I've seen a combination of hoarding and knowledgable yet with major blind spots. I think that this is one of the worst combinations because it usually goes from bad to ugly. No matter how often or how politely you point out the obvious (No, that horse who rears, can't canter on the correct lead, cant turn, and has the bounciest trot known to mankind is not going to make a good beginner lesson horse. Ever.) they refuse to see it. Place had 30 horses, about 10 loose dogs (about 5 whom had been accidentally bred at barn because they were strays and never spayed/neutered), a few mini ponies & a donkey. Horses were mostly in good condition except for really old ones and recently "rescued", but the ignorance was still astounding from people who have supposedly been in the business for 30+ years.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Twin Cities
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    2,102

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    4-H of this variety is alive here, too. That's really sad, given what 4-H was intended to do way back at its inception.

    The gaming thing has produced a bunch of unbroke, scared-looking horses with kids on them who can't control them but don't know how to do better. Lots of tie-downs and creative bitting. Maybe there are good gaming programs out there that I don't know about. But the emphasis on speed seems to be the inciting cause of some piss-poor horsemanship.
    You are SO singing my song.


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  12. #32
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    Apr. 26, 2000
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    3,144

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    We have it all but on the jackwagon end of the spectrum we mainly have folks who somehow ended up with a horse at the beginning of the trail riding "season" never realizing they would have to buy hay at some point. Horses reflect lack of feed, animal control is called, animal control is largely ineffective, and our county gubmint dog & pony show is constantly at odds with the rescue agencies that are contracted (by the county gubmint dog & pony show) so the horses just starve and folks like me spend an excessive amount of time placing phone calls on speed dial.

    1 incident in particular has been on going for 6 d@mn years and only 2 months ago did the poor horses get any hay. It's too much to type but in this case AC has actually tried to educate the poor, bless your sorry heart young woman...wasted breaths. The horses starve while new toys turn up around the house all the time...trampolines, ATVs, a GIANT flat screen that has the ability to blind drivers if you hit the curve at just the right time, new SUVs...and the horses starve. Woman is just too sorry to do right by her critters.

    Most of the folks around here are educate-able [sic]. The ones who are really dangerous are the folks who are regarded as brilliant horsemen but to whom the horses are just a ways and means to separate the well to do clients from the contents of their wallets... Those horses... is it worse to starve in a field chewing on trees or to be an 18mo QH baby & get tortured by the 280lb cowboy that's getting you ring ready? Sure, you get fed, but to stand with your head tied up, around, down, etc. for several hours at a time...then spend the rest of your life living in a stall under lights...these babies never get to be babies. So sad.



  13. #33
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post

    Most of the folks around here are educate-able [sic]. The ones who are really dangerous are the folks who are regarded as brilliant horsemen but to whom the horses are just a ways and means to separate the well to do clients from the contents of their wallets... Those horses... is it worse to starve in a field chewing on trees or to be an 18mo QH baby & get tortured by the 280lb cowboy that's getting you ring ready? Sure, you get fed, but to stand with your head tied up, around, down, etc. for several hours at a time...then spend the rest of your life living in a stall under lights...these babies never get to be babies. So sad.
    Ugh. Totally agree. I get that "it's a business" but trying to make money is no excuse whatsoever for bad horse care. I've seen too much of that, and, UGH. So much for horsemanship!
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey


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  14. #34
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    Oct. 30, 2009
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    1,896

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    I live in rural Fla and have seen it all. These are the same folks who get the puppy and chain it to a tree or have the pack of hounds caged up 24/7, keep everything they ever came across in their front yard and don't know what day is trash pick up day. They have a few beers and decide to ride the horse twice a year.

    I've also seen upper class owners who have a large, financial investment in their horses and God forbid, the horse should get turn out and hurt himself. Maybe two hours a day in a small paddock, if he's lucky, wrapped from head to toe. The horse is ridden in the sand box, 3 times a week and the owner is convinced he cribs because the horse two stalls down taught him.

    Both show a lack of horsemanship in MHO but unless the horse is in distress I too, bite my tongue. I've called about one collector in town and things get better for a few weeks and then go back to the way they were. I wish people could step back and see what is real.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
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    Down on the Farm
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    3,055

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    What I see here is an abundance of OTTB's being bought up cheap by young wannabehorsetrainers. Everyone I meet is a "trainer", regardless of their training, experience and talent. More often than not these horses are dumped because of the owners lack of knowledge to retrain and care for them, part of the problem is also that these folks just don't have the funds to care for their cheap or free horses.


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  16. #36
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    4,164

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    if I drive 45 minutes I'm in the heart of TB country with the fanciest farms you could ever hope to see and babies worth $50K before they hit the ground.

    But in that 45 minute drive there's more than one of the number one types, How'd Rustbreeches put it? this is how Pappy did it?

    Falling down barbed wire, the horses only stay in because they think they should. Or our one annoying neighbor with the single strand of electric, it falls down, one or the other of his scruffy beasts comes over here. I understand about paying the farrier and the vet, sometimes it's hard to come by, but grooming costs nothing - oh excuse me - $2 for a brush that'll get the shedding done. $2 and some time.
    What's even scarier is when the scruffy beasts that come to visit yours haven't had a Coggins or vaccinations in about 20 years and been with critters from Timbuktu.

    Interesting to hear all of these responses; after going 90 rounds with the pro-KB people in that other thread, I'm surer than ever that neglect situations have zip to do with the availability of cheap auctions to unload a horse. Plenty of wanted horses have the kind of care that makes us cringe, as all of us have seen!


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  17. #37
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Oh, LE, there are so many psychological factors going on with people who "keep" animals and things rather than dispose of them. Some of it is the Bambi syndrome, coupled with the inability to step back and view things dispassionately, some lack time, and maybe some would send a horse to the auction but lack the truck and trailer and money for the auction fee.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


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  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    8,137

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    Sigh. Reading this makes me so sad. Actually just last night I had a dream about a Haflinger pony who was kept in a closet under the stairs, Harry Potter style. When I asked the girl why the pony was kept in the closet she said it was because the pony would hurt itself if it was outside . . . but she gave it lots of hay and left the light on for it. Weird dream.

    Anyway, I had a friend whom I would say was well-meaning but ignorant. Tried as I might to educate her (she asked me) about proper nutrition (very basic, as in - your horse needs MORE FOOD!), training, tack, hoof care, etc., she either was too cheap to do what the horses needed, or didn't care as much as she said she did. Eventually she did lease her skinny horse out to someone who put weight on it and got it looking healthier . . . but then that person didn't want it anymore (used it up for what she wanted) and gave it back to my friend's husband after my friend died and I hear the horse is in a sorry state.

    I suppose just like any other place we have the gamut of all types of horse owners. Yes, we've got hoarders; we've got neglecters; we've got people who have expensive horses who show at the UL, we've got nice retirement farms, we have ignorant people who keep them at home and knowledgeable people who keep them at home.

    I will say that more often than not I've actually discouraged people from getting a horse. You know, the "we moved to the country, let's get a horse!" type of people who have no experience whatsoever. I explain how much care, attention, and money it takes and that usually scares them off.
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  19. #39
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post
    Most of the folks around here are educate-able [sic].
    Hey, check it out! "Educable" is a real, honest to God word. Sounds weird, but it was the one you were looking for.

    Otherwise, I'm sorry you have to spectate in you area. It sounds very pre-Revolution France-- with huge gaps between trampoline rich and hungry horses poor living just yards from each other.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
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    1,500

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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    Just today, a man told me he wanted to give me 20 loaves of frozen bread for my horses....I replied my horses weren't going to eat any such bread. He said his llamas ate the stuff all the time, what's the difference? Good thing my horses are back from the front fence, no feeding over the fence!!
    My horses love bread and see it as a treat. Mind you I don't feed them frozen bread but a loaf broken up among them once in awhile isn't a terrible thing.


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