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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,634

    Default Hey Leerburg: Don't advertise your Amish dog leashes with a photo of a starved horse

    This photo is appalling. If that's who makes Leerburg's dog leashes, I wouldn't buy anything from them in a million years.

    http://leerburg.com/leatherleash.htm

    How can anyone in the pet supply business think this is acceptable?
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,487

    Default It really isn't a starved horse

    It is a horse who is a bit lean, but it is a 5 on the Body score scale, no leaner than some racehorses or eventers and the Amish horses do work for a living, as opposed to sitting around and thus won't carry the level of body fat that you might be used to in show horses.

    It has a top line and the hips are rounded.

    Yours
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com


    17 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,181

    Default

    I see a woolly, sweaty horse when I scroll down the linked page ?
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,634

    Default

    It has jutting hipbones, sunken depressions in the croup, and apparent scarring over its visible ribs. Sorry, that is not a "bit lean."
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,866

    Default

    it's not how I would present my horse in public, but it's not starving.
    It ain't fat though, that's for sure.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    It has jutting hipbones, sunken depressions in the croup, and apparent scarring over its visible ribs. Sorry, that is not a "bit lean."
    Hmm...there is a reason you can't give a body condition score via photograph. It is definitely a lean horse, but the apparent scarring in my opinion is dried sweat. I probably wouldn't call it a 5; more like a 4 at best, but without being able to put my hands on it I can't really tell. It looks like it might be quite thin over the backbone and hips, but it really is hard to say for sure from the picture. I agree that I would not present my horse in that condition, and I would probably agree that 100lbs or more would look good on it.

    But, hey, I'd definitely send a message to the company - why not? They must have the ability to get a better photo and maybe know so little about horses they think this is a great picture.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    3,920

    Default

    I also just saw a slightly lean, sweaty horse (who maybe has a little age on him?) They aren't show hunters!
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?


    20 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Toadie's mom View Post
    I also just saw a slightly lean, sweaty horse (who maybe has a little age on him?) They aren't show hunters!
    My exact thoughts.

    It's a working horse, not a show horse, and I don't see any sign of abuse in that picture. A fluffy, sweaty, older horse. Nothing to write home about...


    20 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,379

    Default

    Sweat does strange things to a winter coat.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,663

    Default

    Starved?
    Not hardly.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,913

    Default

    From all the Amish horses I saw when I was driving a big rig, this guy actually looks pretty good. He could look a whole lot worse.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,119

    Default

    Horse looks like it is "rode hard and put up wet". Not in very nice condition, but thats jmho.

    I dislike how the stitching doesn't match at each snap. Looks like low quality workmanship.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,808

    Default

    Gestalt, the quality on those leashes looks substandard to me too. If I'm going to buy leather leashes, I'll just order from Quillin.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,413

    Default

    I'd put him at a 3.5-4 on the BCS. So yes, that is on the thin side of the chart but I think using "starving" and "jutting" is hyperbole. Like others have said, I'd sure be working to put weight on him if he were mine, but this is a hard working Amish horse. They don't have an easy life but I stop (way) short of calling that abuse.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2005
    Posts
    508

    Default

    Just for giggles, I pulled the photo up in Photoshop and resized it so I could see more clearly. That horse is NOT showing any ribs, is not hollow or lacking muscles across the topline or hindquarters, the hipbones aren't jutting out, and it is most certainly not starving. It's a solid 4.5 -5.

    While it is not a particularly well-put together or attractive horse, it is in good weight, and there is even a bit of shine to it, even with a shaggy, sweaty winter coat.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2011
    Location
    IE SoCal
    Posts
    862

    Default

    This is only one of many reasons not to give Leerburg money.

    I'd rather not support someone that thinks choking a dog out is an acceptable training method, based on his misunderstandings of debunked "dominance" crap.
    ______________________________________________
    My Blog -horses & photography



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,434

    Default

    Based on that photo, the worst I can accuse the guy of is being a bad photographer.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    3,819

    Default

    I see a (possibly) older horse who works HARD for a living. Could he stand a few lbs? Sure. But he's hardly about to drop dead from starvation.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    I won't buy from the Amish anyway. I have a dozen other reasons not to give them my money - it sure doesn't end up going to vet care for their animals. Generalization? Sure - but the good Amish won't take a stand against the bad ones, so in general, they suck at animal husbandry and never get my business.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gaitedincali View Post
    This is only one of many reasons not to give Leerburg money.

    I'd rather not support someone that thinks choking a dog out is an acceptable training method, based on his misunderstandings of debunked "dominance" crap.
    I actually consulted with him several years ago about our chow mix that bit another dog, when she was 3. He told me she was dangerous and to have her put down immediatly. I never did, she lived to be 14 and never showed aggression to another creature ever again. Thank goodness I listened to my gut.



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