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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,684

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    This is awesome... thank you guys!!!

    I guess I am just a bit nervous because I want to have a place I can go that is truly enjoyable. For so many years this has been my dream and at home it's usually lonely or non horsey neighbors make life a bit miserable.


    I knew you guys would come up with things I wouldn't even think about.

    And that makes sense about following what everyone else does - I am at an A show barn which I haven't been at much before. It is a small place and everyone seems extremely nice. and it's really neat.

    I think smiling has been really easy because I am happy. At the show we went to recently, people would ask how I was doing etc, and my comment was "I am just so happy to be here." I probably sound like a goober but it is such a joy and I want to make sure I am doing the right things.

    And at horse shows, I asked the BO and Trainer if it was okay to bring the grooms treats and they said it was okay. I didn't bake (which I think is a fantastic idea as Gracelikerain suggested) but brought brownies, chips, water etc.

    And on the carrot thing, I bring my horse a bucket of carrots with a lid so when I feed him, I go in his box so no other horses can see, because I feel bad but if a owner of one of the other horses is there, I offer carrots if they want them. I had a horse that bit and didn't want anyone hand feeding him... so that must be where that comes from. LOL


    At the horse show they were using one of their halters and my horse broke it and I told them I would pay for it and to bill me..... so that was the right thing to do. I felt bad.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2013
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    324

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    I second this. I own a treat hog. He was starved until he was two and even though he is chubby and well fed and cared for he always thinks he is starving. I appreciate if people ask if they can feed him a treat. One treat on the crossties and he's a brat the entire time I'm tacking up. I am fine if someone wants to share but he has to have it in his field so he doesn't pick up bad manners. I agree with the rest of the comments already made. Just follow the rules/what everyone else is doing and keep fairly clean. If something breaks like my horse's halter or blanket I try to fix it as fast as possible so the barn manager isn't trying to use extras on my horse. Also try to stay out of the drama. It can be hard because there is drama at every barn but you will make more friends and have a better relationship with the owner/manager if you keep your nose out of the drama.

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    I agree. I wash legs as needed. Yes. They get washed A LOT in the warm months (which, for my horse means March through November and a few times the other three months!). But, I have to say, all the farriers that come to my barn appreciate that I don't hose all the horses legs if they've been in the mud. We have a lot fewer missing shoes and a lot nicer feet in the barn since I've taken over...multiple reasons, but one they all say is because their legs and feet aren't constantly getting hosed off!

    My pet peeves are clients that lead their horses around the barn by the halter, not the lead. A lot can happen in those few feet from the stall to the grooming area....and a lead rope can make or break that moment!

    I also get tired of clients that allow their horses to have bad ground manners, particularly leading. I HATE horses who pull out the boat anchor routine, and I think they ALL do it if I'm not leading them.

    Clueless people who don't keep their eyes up and ears open when sharing the ring, especially with a lesson going on.

    Clients who hand out treats to EVERY. SINGLE. HORSE. without asking. I have a few in the barn that I don't treat (and I actually treat a lot) because of pushy, bad manners. Ask first, please!



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    3,684

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    Quote Originally Posted by stargzng386 View Post
    I second this. I own a treat hog. He was starved until he was two and even though he is chubby and well fed and cared for he always thinks he is starving. I appreciate if people ask if they can feed him a treat. One treat on the crossties and he's a brat the entire time I'm tacking up.

    LOL - Mine are ALL treat hogs.... I noticed most of the show horses look at you like "where's the treats?" Well loved I guess.

    I don't hand feed too much just because of an old horse of mine being a bite-er and I LOVE feeding my horses in their feeders a big ole bucket of carrots and as they eat them, I hug them, pet them, kiss on them and check their legs, back etc.

    And if I walk up while the grooms are tacking up my horse I say, Oh I will leave until you are done because he wants his cookies if I stand near and I don't want him to be a brat. They laugh..... and I wait to give him a cookie. Gotta bribe em.... since I don't ride as good as my trainer does LOL
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2013
    Posts
    324

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    lol! Mine gets a stud muffin when I go get him in the field, carrots when I put him back out. He is low man on the pecking order so I give him the carrots right before the gate and make him do stretches. Then he gets a peppermint or regular cookie right after I turn him out (because otherwise he will stand at the gate staring at me and make me feel guilty) If he was super good on our ride or really tolerant with me he gets another stud muffin. I don't mind spoiling him but he's annoying enough by the field. People have walked up and given him one treat on the crossties and then he acts like he has ants in his pants and can't stand still the entire time until I get on to ride and work his butt. My barn manager will now hide a goodie for him in my grooming box when he can't see her and will tell me about it to give him when I turn him out lol



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    1,929

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTB-HP View Post

    As for socialization. I personally believe that no matter how much money a person has or how many horses they own, they are not better than anyone at that farm. Whether it be BO, BM, grooms or stablehands, we are all equal individuals. I talk to the stable hands, have conversations with them everytime I am at the farm. I ask about my horse, how is he doing, how are their horses at their homes, etc.... I was told that all communications with stablehand needs to go through BM versus talking directly to them. I have a problem with that and it makes me feel uncomfortable. I did not know that prior to moving to farm.
    I wanted to address what you posted. As a BO, I really appreciate it when clients are polite and friendly with my workers. But while you may be out at the barn to ride your horse and have fun, stable workers are at work. They have tasks they need to be doing and if they stopped to chit-chat with each person they would have difficulty getting their work done and potentially be in trouble with their employer. Be sure to treat staff with professional respect and let them attend to their job the same way you probably need to when you are at work.

    I also have to say I mostly agree with your BM--most concerns/discussion about horse care beyond a simple "How's he doing?" should probably include your BM directly. As a BM myself, I have to know what is going on with each horse since I'm responsible. Some of my workers are great, but for some there is a language or knowledge barrier that might preclude them from understanding instructions correctly or they may not communicate that information to other caretakers. Figure out who is responsible for what at your barn and address concerns to the appropriate person.

    Lastly, on occasion it has made me/and or an employee uncomfortable when a client is "too friendly." In one case a client wanted special treatment for her horse. In another situation, a client was interested in a relationship with a groom (who was not interested). These were awkward situations.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2013
    Posts
    342

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    Don't sneak your vet out at 5 in the morning and breed your mare without asking me if I want another pregnant mare on the farm and a new foal.

    Yes I had someone do this!



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,385

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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeHoney View Post
    I wanted to address what you posted. As a BO, I really appreciate it when clients are polite and friendly with my workers. But while you may be out at the barn to ride your horse and have fun, stable workers are at work. They have tasks they need to be doing and if they stopped to chit-chat with each person they would have difficulty getting their work done and potentially be in trouble with their employer. Be sure to treat staff with professional respect and let them attend to their job the same way you probably need to when you are at work.

    I also have to say I mostly agree with your BM--most concerns/discussion about horse care beyond a simple "How's he doing?" should probably include your BM directly. As a BM myself, I have to know what is going on with each horse since I'm responsible. Some of my workers are great, but for some there is a language or knowledge barrier that might preclude them from understanding instructions correctly or they may not communicate that information to other caretakers. Figure out who is responsible for what at your barn and address concerns to the appropriate person.

    Lastly, on occasion it has made me/and or an employee uncomfortable when a client is "too friendly." In one case a client wanted special treatment for her horse. In another situation, a client was interested in a relationship with a groom (who was not interested). These were awkward situations.
    I agree on all accounts. While I will talk to the staff when they are not at work (they live on site and will come around occasionally) I only give them instructions if I have been asked to do so by the BO or BM. As a boarder, it is not my place to ask the staff to do things for me...or to even ask how my horse is (although the staff at my barn would not know that...they are just cleaners/farm maintenance folks. They do not deal with the horses AT ALL.)
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Posts
    1,127

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    Me going on vacation for two weeks doesn't mean that my $20 bottle of endure fly spray (which is in MY grooming bag, with MY name on the bag and all the products in it) is a free for all!



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    743

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    I think the biggest don't would be DON'T assume - when in doubt DO ask (the highest authority you can find, double check the answer with the BO if you had to ask someone else).

    DO know and follow the barn rules - there will always be little differences from barn to barn and knowing the rules will keep you in the good books, and prevent you for getting annoyed at people not following a rule that doesn't exist.

    DO remember that your opinion of any given rule is irrelevant. You chose to board there, with those rules. Follow them.

    DON'T judge other boarders by your own idea of "good horsemanship" - for example if washing legs after every ride works for you, great, but other people may have other methods of controlling cannon crud and/or leg fungus.


    Some of the things people have mentioned would be disasters if done where I live (major climatic differences obviously) so it really comes down to respecting the barn rules that specific barn has.

    I agree with BeeHoney's post about the barn staff. They are told to be polite to the clients, so if they show any irritation at having their work interrupted they're going to get in trouble - so don't think they don't mind talking to you, even if they say they don't mind. I would like to add that some barn staff board their horse where they work - DO treat them as fellow boarders when they're not working (as in DON'T ask them anything you wouldn't ask any other boarder, or give them instructions, or ask them to do something, or how your horse is doing, etc - that is totally unfair to them).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2010
    Posts
    247

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    People seem to be missing a big one: DO and ALWAYS thank your trainer after every lesson. It doesn't matter if it was a good lesson or an absolutely horrible one for you. Always, always, always thank them.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
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    1,127

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    Quote Originally Posted by DNB View Post
    People seem to be missing a big one: DO and ALWAYS thank your trainer after every lesson. It doesn't matter if it was a good lesson or an absolutely horrible one for you. Always, always, always thank them.
    Why is this a big one?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2000
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    889

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    I'd like to repeat ...don't use other people's supplies. If you didn't pay for it its not yours to use.

    I don't mind people borrowing a saddle pad, bridle, etc. Just put in back and all is well. But my using my supplements, vitamins, fly spray, linamint, and other supplies that cost money to replace what you took infuriates me.

    Don't be that person.



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2010
    Posts
    247

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    Quote Originally Posted by PonyPenny View Post
    Why is this a big one?
    Regardless of the fact that we obviously pay them to teach us, it is the respectful thing to do to thank the trainer/instructor after they give you a lesson. I was raised to thank any person after they help you. Trainers are there to help us and our horse be successful. It's the polite thing to do to thank them for the time and effort they put into helping us and our horse(s) be successful and reach our goals.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    877

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    I'm guilty of riding a dirty horse all of the time. I have a gray who wallows in mud like a pig and is never clean. I work a demanding job with inflexible hours and i travel constantly. So in order for me to fit riding into my schedule i have to cut down time in some areas. So the horse gets minimum grooming and my tack rarely gets cleaned except weekends. If we had a full service option I'd be all over it but until then, hes gonna get ridden a little bit muddy.
    ************************
    "I can't help but wonder,what would Jimmy Buffett do?"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2008
    Location
    The eastern edge of the eventing wasteland
    Posts
    490

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    Lots of good stuff already posted but I'll play...

    DO be on time and ready for your lesson. This is really for more advanced lessons. That does not mean swinging a leg over precisely when the lesson begins. That means get on and warm up on your own for 10 minutes prior to the lesson to get you and your horse warmed up a little. For those that still need more help, be 10 minutes early. Find out which horse you are riding, go pee, get your helmet on and be ready to go when the lesson starts.

    Whether you are riding a private horse or a school horse, I do expect that horse to be clean and the tack to be properly fitted. It is your job as the rider to make sure the horse is not injured or sick before you get on. I do not posses X-ray vision so I cannot see through boots or under the saddle if the horse has an injury. If you are not sure ASK ME!

    DO be properly attired. No tank tops. No butt cracks. If your horse needs a whip and spurs or any other equipment have them on.

    Please let me know ASAP when you need to cancel. I understand the flat tire on the way to the barn but I get peeved that you are calling me an hour before the lesson to tell me you forgot you have another appointment at that time.

    You are paying me for my professional opinion and for me to share my experience and knowledge with you. I will do my very best to ensure you have a enjoyable, educational and safe lesson. I do expect you to practice what I have taught you when you ride on your own, if you have any desire to advance. Do not complain to me that you or your horse are not progressing if you do not apply yourself. ( BTDT )

    On the opposite side of that coin, I have enough gray hairs and wrinkles, more than I want. Please don't tell me you think you are good enough to jump X high when you can barely do two point.

    If you ask me what I think, then you ask Betty Boarder and Tommy Trainer what they think, don't be surprised if you get conflicting information.

    Communication is a two way street. If you don't get it, tell me. If you are scared, tell me. If you need a break, tell me. Honestly, the last place I look is the riders face. And I have a tough time reading expressions from 20 yards way. While you may think I possess God-like powers over horses, that does not extend to reading human minds.

    When you ask me to ride your horse, please know I will treat that horse as good as my own. I will probably grow to love him/her. That is why I do what I do. I want your horse and you to be and do the very best you can. I will share your joy, applaud and cheer your accomplishments and cry with you when you suffer disappointment and heartache. When I tell you to do something whether you like it or not, I tell you for these reasons. So if that means I think your horse prefers dressage to jumping or I think I should school your horse a little more often for the next couple of weeks or you are not ready to move up or, really, you CAN do that show or maybe it's time for supplements or injections, it is not because I think you have a money tree in your backyard. I am doing it because I believe it is in you & your horses best interests.

    Lastly, while once upon a time I was happy to work around horses for free, and a large part of me still feels like that, this is a business to me. I truly appreciate being paid on time the full amount I am owed. Like you, I do have bills to pay. I too would like to be able to splurge on a book or dinner.
    "You're horse is behind the vertical!"
    "Of course he's behind the vertical, I haven't jumped it yet!"
    - NLK
    "I am a sand dancer... just here for the jumps!" - Schrammo
    www.nshaonline.org


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2009
    Posts
    1,668

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    DO be nice to other trainers and riders at horse shows. Spend a little more time being friendly and helpful and a little less time bad mouthing everyone else. You'll be surprised how far little acts of kindness go.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
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    Mar. 22, 2013
    Posts
    23

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    I agree with grooming your horse well every time you ride, but as someone who has a horse that finds the mud during a drought, I can sympathize with how hard it is to groom a dirty horse and ride when you're pressed for time. I used to ride really early in the morning before work and while I would have loved to make my horse spotless, I also realize the importance of his workout. I needed to make sacrifices where I could and if his rump was caked in mud, so be it. I always made sure to come back later and wash his legs



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
    Posts
    10,385

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbtoo View Post
    using my supplements, vitamins, fly spray, linamint, and other supplies that cost money to replace what you took infuriates me.
    My theory on this? If I have to use some of yours because I ran out, I will replace yours with a full, new one, ASAP. You end up with more than you started with...and it usually means people are happy to lend so of whatever it was.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
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    Feb. 3, 2012
    Posts
    234

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    If you are going to borrow something, that is fine. Just put it back exactly as it was and in the same condition.



  20. #60
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    Mar. 20, 2013
    Location
    Way up North
    Posts
    68

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    If/when you bring people with you to the barn to meet your horse and/or watch you ride, keep an eye on them. Don't let them climb the fence into the paddock of a very protective mare with a new foal, don't let them walk into a horse's stall unless it is yours. With kids, don't let them run up and down the aisle.



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