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  1. #1
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    Default Why horses are feeling the strain of Britain’s obesity crisis




  2. #2
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    Obesity crisis or not, I don't really see how most healthy adult riders can weigh less than 10% the weight of their horse.

    If the average horse weighs a bit over 1000lbs that would mean that the ideal rider for that horse shouldn't weigh over 100lbs (which allows for x number of pounds for the saddle, etc.)

    I'm 5'10 and I don't consider myself to be overweight, but using their system I basically couldn't ride anything but a draft/ draft cross or perhaps a really beefy warmblood. That just doesn't seem correct.
    Last edited by c'est moi; Mar. 24, 2013 at 05:47 PM.


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  3. #3
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    I've been under the impression it was 20%. Any links to the research saying 10%?
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  4. #4
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    As always, who funded the study?

    This was relevant but experienced horse people know it. “There is a discussion which needs to take place in the horse riding community. There needs to be an awareness that some larger riders need to ride bigger horses.”

    The linked article did not mention if they took into account terrain and footing. Using their parameters- I would have no problem putting someone at 20% of a horses weight to go on a level ride in light footing but that would be a no go if it was a vigorous trail ride up and down steep hills with many deep creek crossings. I drove miniature horses in CDE's for a couple years. Terrain and footing were CRITICAL to their individual well being.


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  5. #5
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    I have a friend who weighs right around 40 percent of one of her horses' weight. I cringe and tell her to not ride that horse, ride her other horse, but what do I know??
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by c'est moi View Post
    Obesity crisis or not, I don't really see how a most healthy adult riders can weigh less than 10% the weight of their horse.

    If the average horse weighs a bit over 1000lbs that would mean that the ideal rider for that horse shouldn't weigh over 100lbs, which allows for x number of pounds for the saddle, etc.

    I'm 5'10 and while I don't consider myself to be overweight, using their system I basically couldn't ride anything but a draft/ draft cross or perhaps a really beefy warmblood. That just doesn't seem correct.
    This.


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  7. #7
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    Default

    There's also an article on this in today's Daily Mail:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-problems.html
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by c'est moi View Post
    Obesity crisis or not, I don't really see how a most healthy adult riders can weigh less than 10% the weight of their horse.

    If the average horse weighs a bit over 1000lbs that would mean that the ideal rider for that horse shouldn't weigh over 100lbs, which allows for x number of pounds for the saddle, etc.
    I am wondering the same thing. 10% seems like an awfully small number for some of the smaller, lighter breeds to be ridden by adults.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    I am wondering the same thing. 10% seems like an awfully small number for some of the smaller, lighter breeds to be ridden by adults.
    Me too. . . .so if you have a 900lb arab, only small children could ride it? My daughter is 9 years old and 5'1" and weighs 100lbs, and I'd have to tell her she was too big/fat to ride a 900 lb pony or small horse? ? I myself am 6'1" . . . and that would mean I could ride only a draft or large draft cross. I thought the rule of thumb was 20%. Not 10%


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  10. #10
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    This page http://www.gaitedhorses.net/Articles/HRiderGuide.shtml has a formula to use that basically relies on the horse's bone, but it appears to go well over 10%. The study referenced in the article basically just says that lots of riders are greater than 10% without any data to back up the 10% - just says it's a number figured out by the vets.

    < This is the “optimum” ratio on a set of guidelines worked out by vets. >
    Is this set of guidelines available anywhere?
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  11. #11
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    Over 15% is a welfare issue?

    Better go tell every non-anorexic western and endurance rider that they're abusing their stock. You'd have to be under 90# to use a working saddle and be under 15% on an average size QH. Even with an ultralight endurance saddle, you can't be more than 100#.
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  12. #12
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    Hmmm...I do occasionally see horse/rider combinations that concern me, but 10% is pretty extreme. That would leave most horses waiting around for 100 lb riders!

    I've always heard 20% (rider plus tack) as a rough guideline...then take horse build and rider skill and balance/body control to adjust from there.

    At 5'9", medium boned and quite thin, I'm always around 135-140lbs..I really can't weigh much less without looking like skeleton. According to that article, by the time I add a saddle, I should be looking drafts .


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  13. #13
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    I fall somewhere between 10 and 15% on my 16.3 WB, 1500lb WB. Does that mean I'm abusing the poor boy? Clearly he can't handle my weight

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  14. #14
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    10% is a suspiciously round number and just does not bear scrutiny.

    The largest of my horses is a 17hh draft cross that weighs maybe 1500 lb when in full work and a bit fat. It's uncommon that I see a horse significantly bigger than him except for heavy drafts.

    So essentially nobody over 150 lb should ride? Average size horses are for children. Fit women can ride very large horses, and all men are out of luck.

    Keep in mind that once upon a time most riders were men. Do you think there were many 100 lb men to ride 1000 lb cavalry horses? Maybe they needed to find 50 lb soldiers to allow for 50 lb of equipment?


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  15. #15
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    Seems to be a dearth of research on the topic and nothing I can find that suggests 10%. Most of the info out there seems to be based on one study of 8 horses which supports a 20% limit total.

    http://www.equinews.com/article/hors...bility-studied

    http://www.equisearch.com/horses_car..._carry_062608/



  16. #16
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    I seem to remember a good thread about this on the Endurance board awhile back--at least I think it was there. Might want to search it. The topic has definitely been up before.



  17. #17
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    By these standards jockeys are too heavy! (Assuming the average tb is 1000lb and average jock is 115lb)
    I call BS


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  18. #18
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    another consideration: big difference btn 1000 lb of fit horse or 1000 lbs of pasture puff?


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  19. #19
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    I call BS. Yes some riders need larger horses, but abuse? Get over it. I guess nobody over 120lb should ride.


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  20. #20
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    I remember visiting the Tower of London and seeing King Henry VIII's armour which showed he had a 52" girth. Henry rode many a horse with amour. Think what that must of weighed?



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