The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default Tips/Tricks for Riding Down Center Line

    Hi I am new to dressage and will be showing Training Level this year predominately at breed shows. I've been reading through past threads for tips and tricks to riding a successful training level test and have found a lot of great information.

    However, I haven't found a ton of info on tips/tricks of how to get a really good turn down center line. I know the test reads at A to come down center line however I feel like if I wait till A I'm overshooting where I need to be. Any tips/tricks for this?

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
    Posts
    5,978

    Default

    It's a half of a 10 m circle if you're turning from the inside of the ring. You have to make a corner, not a sharp turn. Have you jumped? LOOK where you're going. Turn your head and shoulders and the horse will follow.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    It's a half of a 10 m circle if you're turning from the inside of the ring. You have to make a corner, not a sharp turn. Have you jumped? LOOK where you're going. Turn your head and shoulders and the horse will follow.
    I have jumped before and I was going the route of looking to make the turn down center line but I was concerned that the turn wasn't happening right at A as written in the test. Is that the appropriate way to ride the test?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
    Posts
    3,282

    Default

    Dont think of the turn as a 90 degree angle, think of it as the 1/2 circle mentioned above. You should have a smooth movement from long side around the ring corner and onto the center line, which you won't really hit for a stride or two from the short side.
    Later, at first or 2nd level, you will actually do two 90 degree turns at the end of the test to get to center line.

    If you have a regulation size arena, sit a cone or some marker just to the outside of the center line, and between the last set of letters; use that marker to get a feel for the flow.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Ok this is making sense. Just to verify should you ride the final corner as deep as the others or is it acceptable to round the whole short end off a little to come down center line?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2001
    Posts
    9,343

    Default

    At training/first level all corners should be ridden like a half circle of 10 m. At your entry, this isn't a big issue. At the end of the test, the centerline is just 2 of these in rapid succession. The other thing to think about is how to keep your centerline straight. Riding the centerline like a lengthening helps this a lot. Depending on fitness levels, this can be tough at the end of your test because your horse may be tired. But if you prepare properly, that last corner and centerline turn can work for you. Make sure you enter that last corner with a lot of energy and maintain it through the 2nd turn. Then allow some release down the centerline. It works like a sling shot.
    I school long side/centerline/long side (with or without a halt at X) a lot to prepare.

    This is one movement where practice really pays off and it is possible to get very high marks if you nail it.
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nhwr View Post
    At training/first level all corners should be ridden like a half circle of 10 m. At your entry, this isn't a big issue. At the end of the test, the centerline is just 2 of these in rapid succession. The other thing to think about is how to keep your centerline straight. Riding the centerline like a lengthening helps this a lot. Depending on fitness levels, this can be tough at the end of your test because your horse may be tired. But if you prepare properly, that last corner and centerline turn can work for you. Make sure you enter that last corner with a lot of energy and maintain it through the 2nd turn. Then allow some release down the centerline. It works like a sling shot.
    I school long side/centerline/long side (with or without a halt at X) a lot to prepare.

    This is one movement where practice really pays off and it is possible to get very high marks if you nail it.

    This makes a lot of sense. I'm possibly riding the corners a bit too deep in general and might be why I'm getting a little stuck trying to make the turn down center line after the final turn at the end of the test. I'll mark off some 10 meter circles at each corner and school those. I definitely don't want to lose points on moves that we are capable of nailing with practice. Thanks everyone!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2003
    Location
    Townsend, MA
    Posts
    1,110

    Default

    Look the judge straight in the eye or a bit above their head and ride actively forward.
    Have you ever ridden a bicycle? If you try to crawl slowly on a bicycle, you will wobble all over the place. Now, if you pedal, you will more easily steer a straight line.
    Granted, horses are not bicycles, but you are better of with activity than too slow.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dotneko View Post
    Look the judge straight in the eye or a bit above their head and ride actively forward.
    Have you ever ridden a bicycle? If you try to crawl slowly on a bicycle, you will wobble all over the place. Now, if you pedal, you will more easily steer a straight line.
    Granted, horses are not bicycles, but you are better of with activity than too slow.
    I like the analogy! Once we are heading down center line it is usually pretty good but we were definitely struggling with where to make the turn to come down center line in relation to A. Thanks for all the great ideas everyone!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,464

    Default

    If you feel like you are drifting past your turn really concentrate on your outside aids to help create a supportive "wall" to balance your horse through the turn. My mare can blow past the turn down center if I get complacent with my outside aids and don't show her exactly where I expect her to turn.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2006
    Location
    North of the Frozen Tundra, but I can see it from my house.
    Posts
    1,296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kwalker024 View Post
    Ok this is making sense. Just to verify should you ride the final corner as deep as the others or is it acceptable to round the whole short end off a little to come down center line?
    Don't worry about "the others". look to the training scale. Practice the 1/2 10 m circle, paying attention to the rhythm and the relaxation. Go as deep as you can, while being true to the rhythm and relaxation.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Carol O View Post
    Don't worry about "the others". look to the training scale. Practice the 1/2 10 m circle, paying attention to the rhythm and the relaxation. Go as deep as you can, while being true to the rhythm and relaxation.
    Great advice! I will definitely start schooling it like that!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,467

    Default

    What Carol said, but plan ahead. Don't wait til you get there to start your turn, keep the center line in the corner of your eye,and go! Go, being the operative word.. It is almost impossible to ride a straight line if your horse is not Forward! At this level a walk stride is permissible, before the halt.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Ride like others have said coming in at A. Also your corners should be ridden as a corner, deeper not a circle. If you are circling at say A then you will use your corners more as a circle shape and not go as deep in. Judges like to see a difference in this but a lot of times they don't at lower levels. Also make sure to keep your horse between your legs. If you know say he will float say right a bit be prepared to get that leg on and beat him to it. Also remember to hold him in-between your legs at the halt and you will keep your leg on for an active halt that is balanced.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
    Posts
    5,978

    Default

    It's training level. If you can make that turn down the centerline, you're doing pretty well. My four year old could barely make that 10 m turn she is was big and not coordinated enough yet. There is no score for corners. There are scores for being balanced into the turn, so just focusing on doing a half of a 10 m circle onto A is doing a good job.

    Don't waste your time trying to do things you can't do and aren't scored on. Use the corners to balance and get control of yourself and your horse. It's a great place to set up for other moves, and, unless you do something dramatically wrong there, you won't be scored on them.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2001
    Location
    Bryan,Texas
    Posts
    2,261

    Default

    10 meter circles will be with you forever, so start practicing them now and forever. And also lots 10 meter 1/2 circles.
    They may be rough to start but they will get better.

    Also ride off the wall (on the inside track)(or in an open field) to develope your straightness--horse between your hands and legs - not wobbling in a straight line. This will help your centerlines. From this exercise you will learn to feel your horse's crookiness and be able to strengthen his weak areas of his body.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,375

    Default

    Max Gahwyler's The Competitive Edge series is full of wonderful advice and strategies. The books refer to old tests, but movements haven't changed.

    (http://www.amazon.com/Max-Gahwyler/e/B001KCLX7G)
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2006
    Posts
    3,505

    Default

    Visualize rail road tracks curving and then straight down the middle.

    Pick a bend youd like and keep it through the turn then slowly straighten instead of ping! THink slowly switching bend but stop in the middle if they are not really for really open straight without help ;D
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,815

    Default

    Remember the corner letters are 6 M from the short side. A 10M circle would touch the long side 1M before the corner letter, and touch the short side halfway to A (or C).
    So, start your turn 1M (about a stride) after the corner letter, touch the short side at the right place, and don't change anything until you are on the center line. Make your outside aids become the "walls" on that open side!

    It really helped me to ride 10m circles in the corners, using a cone to mark the CL where I should hit it - 5M in from the short side.

    To compare this to a 20M circle: A 20M circle hits the long side 10M from the end - that's 4 M beyond the corner letter.
    When riding corners, be sure you don't follow that 20M circle path left by earlier work - go deeper into the corner, but not so deep that you interfere with your rhythm.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    286

    Default

    You said you were a jumper... Ride it like a rollback. I am in a little different position than you since I ride sidesaddle and need the help my hips and torso give me to keep a solid turn and straight line, as I come past F, I look back towards the judge and in the beginning I thought ofmitmlike a rollback. Got me a decent turn and a straight finish. Probably sounds silly to most, but t worked for me



Similar Threads

  1. Tips or tricks to find a go button...
    By nlk in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Feb. 19, 2013, 04:50 PM
  2. Favorite household tips and tricks?
    By Neighland in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Sep. 7, 2012, 07:54 AM
  3. Clipping Tricks & Tips
    By *jumper* in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Nov. 14, 2011, 08:36 PM
  4. First day of first real big kid job - tips and tricks?
    By SaturdayNightLive in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2011, 06:01 PM
  5. Rolex Tips and Tricks
    By Jumpin_Horses in forum Off Course
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jan. 4, 2011, 03:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness