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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2009
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    Default Impossible fetlock sores :(

    My mare has fetlock sores that I just can't seem to get rid of. I've tried using duct tape, which doesn't seem to stay on more than 8 hours. I've tried the professionals choice bed sore boots, which help some, but only keep the sores from getting worse, they don't allow them to heal.

    I have been able to get rid of them by using standing bandages at night until they healed. But the dime to nickel sized sores always come back and I feel like such a bad owner . I'd just like to find another way to help these without having to go out every night to wrap her.

    Does anybody have any other suggestions for boots she can wear or other treatment methods that have worked for them? She's stalled on matts/shavings and turned out in a snowy paddock right now.
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Default

    Have you tried increasing the depth of her bedding. Some horses can't seem to get up without rolling onto both fetlocks, and grinding them in. The bandages help but the bedding is important.

    You may have to change the type of bedding you use for her.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2009
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    The Frozen Tundra
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    thanks merrygoround, I have increased the bedding and will certainly add more, but she seems to get them in turnout too (she likes to lay down outside too...)
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
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    Where is gets way too cold
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    Default

    I use heavy rubber upturned bell boots. Make sure they are tall enough to cover the area well. If she wears bell boots over her feet, that usually helps prop them up over the fetlocks. If the sores are open when I start, I wipe them clean and slather Neosporin on them every day, otherwise they get scabby and dry and seem to scar more.

    Are you sure she isn't doing this by buckling onto her fetlocks when she sleeps standing up? Several of the horses I've seen with significant fetlock sores have sleep problems (I own one of them now). If you regularly find her down sleeping, or covered in bedding, that's probably not the issue.
    Good luck.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Western Washington
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    Default

    Is she able to get her head through or over something to bang on a solid wall? My mare used to put her head through her window and bang with her front legs.

    I have battled this for about 3 years now. She wears bedsore boots all the time to protect her. It is a royal PITA if the scars open. Any little break and I have to treat it aggressively. Clean, spray with a healing spray, put on a small folded square of paper towel, then wrap with gauze, then vetwrap, then the bedsore boots. Change the bandage every few days or when they slip. Keep this up until the sore is completely closed with skin. A scab is not enough.

    Keep the fronts of her legs clean so there's nothing between her and the booties - mud, shavings, gravel, a frog hair - to abrade the skin.

    Be obsessive about it. If she's a banger, has a window and is stalled at night, close it with a note to please keep it closed.

    I have perhaps a dozen pairs of bedsore boots. Both Professional's Choice and Equipro. The barn staff likes the Equipro and in a way I like them too, because it's nearly impossible to put them on too tight. They're neoprene and easy to clean. But! my mare has developed rubs from the strap if she wears them exclusively for too long.

    I'm sorry to hear this. It's a bummer. My biggest regret is that I didn't get on top of this early on, and now are dealing with scars. The scars are getting smaller, but ... sigh.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
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    851

    Default

    I do the upside down bell boot thing. Seems to work for my mare.



  7. #7
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    Jun. 9, 2009
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    Default

    Thank you for all the tips! I haven't tried bandaging under her bedsore boots or the upside down bell boots. She doesn't wear the heavy Italian rubber ones already, do you do pull ins upside down too or Velcro ones so you can size down?
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
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    Default

    The soft rubber gum bell boots, flipped upside down. They let the sores breathe to heal but protect them when needed. Just flip them down when you ride. Even my vet recommends this strategy!
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
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    Where is gets way too cold
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Twigster View Post
    Thank you for all the tips! I haven't tried bandaging under her bedsore boots or the upside down bell boots. She doesn't wear the heavy Italian rubber ones already, do you do pull ins upside down too or Velcro ones so you can size down?
    I use Velcro ones on the fetlocks so they are easy to take off when I ride.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Location
    California
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    I've actually found that the Davis bell boots work well for this purpose
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
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    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
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    Default

    How about when a horse is turned out, in a wet climate? My older gelding has sleep issues, and buckles onto his fetlocks--I seriously have never seen him lie down at night in his stall..and there is no evidence of him doing it. So...I have bedsore boots and that works great in the dry months/inside, but what do you all do for wet turnout time? I haven't tried the turned up bell boots, but I'm afraid they'd simply get pulled down or fill up with water (not really, but the image made me giggle a bit).

    Also, where do you guys buy your bed sore boots? He's a fine-legged TB, so most "horse size" items are too big.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2004
    Location
    Canada
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    Default

    My old TB mare had that problem years ago. I had to make her bedsore boots back then. I used leather which may have been a better material because they helped. I also used Preparation H to help heal the sores as recommended by a vet. In the end they did clear up. When I think about it I used newborn size disposable diapers as a dressing. It was a number of years ago.
    \"Have a heart that never hardens, a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.\" Charles Dickens



  13. #13
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    Oct. 9, 2008
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    316

    Default

    I've had pretty good luck with washing and drying the legs thoroughly and once they are completely dry putting an small bit of your ointment of choice (I like Tri-care or Corona) over just the sore, enough to moisturize it but not make it goopy. Then cover with cover with a piece of elastikon bandage. Very similar to the duct tape technique but I find the elastikon sticks better.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2013
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    Hopefully at the barn
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    I got rid of my boy's fetlock sores (sort of- it's a work in progress) by deepening the shavings in his stall and smearing on lots of Corona Ointment, but I'm curious to se how other people deal with these.
    Tack Cleaning/All-Things-Tack nut
    ~DQ wanna-be~



  15. #15
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    Mar. 4, 2007
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    Western Washington
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    How about when a horse is turned out, in a wet climate?

    Also, where do you guys buy your bed sore boots? He's a fine-legged TB, so most "horse size" items are too big.
    CC, I don't think our weather north of Seattle is much drier than yours. The bedsore boots get muddy, and do eventually soak through. But I've been surprised at how long they'll stay dry, even in rain. Maybe it's because they're "under" her rainsheet. But she does get a new pair about every day when it's really nasty out.

    Professional Choice changed the sizing and the newer ones are, in fact, big. But the EquiPro is really one size fits all. They might work better for you and other than the fact that my dog loves to chew on them, they seem nearly indestructible.
    https://www.equipro.com/Bedsore_Boots_8FUL.html



  16. #16
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    Jun. 9, 2009
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    Thanks you all! I am going with obsessive cleaning + Zephyrs Garden healing salve and upside down bell boots. Already they look 10x better. The bell boots are really letting the cleaning and healing salve do their magic!
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    809

    Default

    Is it possible to put a sandy spot in the pasture? My mare would get rubs when she was stalled, no matter the depth of bedding...she would shove it all up against the walls, so none would be left in the middle. She also would get the sores when she lived out all the time, from not having a soft enough spot the lay down in.

    I had a huge area of sand put in at my place, and it's been 3 years since she's gotten any kind of rub! She has access to it at night, so she can sleep in the sand.
    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I have a mare on stall rest and found that Wonder Dust works fantastic. I had issues with hock sores. Hock and fetlock sores are tough to heal when they are on the joint like that. Every time my mare would get up, the scab would break open again. The Wonder Dust healed them up by keeping it dried out and therefore allowing it to scab and heal. My vet recommended it and it's working awesome!


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
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    Default

    These are the ONLY thing I will use on my older mare (or any horse) that gets fetlock sores -

    https://www.equipro.com/Bedsore_Boots_8FUL.html

    They're safe. They work. They're easy to put on and off. When I first got them a couple of years ago, I had tried everything else recommended here. My mare had one sore so big and raw that it took several weeks to heal.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Discobold View Post
    These are the ONLY thing I will use on my older mare (or any horse) that gets fetlock sores -

    https://www.equipro.com/Bedsore_Boots_8FUL.html

    They're safe. They work. They're easy to put on and off. When I first got them a couple of years ago, I had tried everything else recommended here. My mare had one sore so big and raw that it took several weeks to heal.
    How long do they last? I use the Davis bedsore boots which look similar to the equipro and cost about the same. The problem is that the Davis bedsore boots wear out pretty fast.



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