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  1. #1
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    Default Different "styles" of Quarterhorse?

    Ran across an add for a 2007 quarterhorse mare -- to me though, she just doesn't look much like a quarterhorse. Looks more like a Thoroughbred or Standardbred cross to me, but I don't have much experience with Quarterhorses. She just doesn't seem to have that stereotypical QH rump. Not criticizing the horse or the ad, just curious.

    Picture #1
    Picture #2
    Picture #3



  2. #2
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    Sep. 29, 2009
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    Default

    *Totally* looks like a QH to me. Even with no papers, or the guess this breed, QH hands down.


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  3. #3
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    Just looks like a QH little muscling and not-so-great conformation to me. Plus it is possible to breed a horse that has a large percentage of TB blood but is still registrable as a quarter horse.
    "Winter's a good time to stay in and cuddle,
    but put me in summer and I'll be a... happy snowman!!!"

    Trolls be trollin'! -DH



  4. #4
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    Quarter horses are called the most versatile breed for a reason.
    You can find all kinds of them, from the overly beefy, big halter ones, to the little very quick cutting lines, to the lanky wp greyhound slinkers, to the fast racers and those also come in different lines, depending on the distance they may run.

    There is probably a qh for every one out there, if you look long enough, that has been bred just right for what you want to do.
    Specialization hit the qhs about 30+ years ago and so the differences between lines just got bigger.

    In a way, differences are your genetic insurance that you won't end in a gene bottleneck, permitting outcrossing thru lines and then you get your committee type horses, that look a bit like different horses put together in one, until you again stabilize those lines into the one look and performance you want.

    You probably have there one of those crossed any which way horses, that produced the expected mismatch of parts, but may be just right for what you want to do.
    I have one such horse right now, way inbred Doc Bar, that someone tried then to outcross and he, well, being a first cross, looks the part and moves like it too.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks. Like I said, more curiosity than anything else. Interesting that large % TB can still be registered as a quarter horse - something else I did not know.



  6. #6
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    Oct. 9, 2007
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    Default

    I thought Quarter Horses were a closed breeding book.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by skykingismybaby1 View Post
    I thought Quarter Horses were a closed breeding book.
    No, you can add registered TB's to the mix and if you prove them, get any kind of performance records as per the rule book, you can get permanent papers on those horses and their offspring.

    The one horse I have has "appendix" papers, because he is part TB but no one proved their cross, being ranch horses and so he can't be used for breeding, but still can be used for any other a regularly registered qh can be, shown or raced.



  8. #8
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skykingismybaby1 View Post
    I thought Quarter Horses were a closed breeding book.
    Not entirely. Appendix QHs (TBxQH crosses) can "earn" their way into the main book by getting a Registry of Merit, mostly performance based.

    So in addition to that TB blood getting in, the QH is just NOT an old breed. My guy, a ranch-bred sort and one who nobody denies is a QH just looking at him, has TB blood as soon as five generations back.

    I imagine the racing-bred QH's have even more TB blood.



  9. #9
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    Default

    OP, you might be thinking of the "foundation Quarter horse" "type".

    If you do a google image search for "foundation quarter horse", I think you'll see the stereotypical "style" that you're thinking of.



  10. #10
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    Mar. 4, 2007
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    Default

    Here's a link to my first horse. She was a racing-bred QH, not stocky at all. Lots of TB in her background, including Man O War.

    http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/dancin+fan



  11. #11
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    Mar. 20, 2013
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    CT
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    Default

    As the owner of a registered QH who is in fact nearly 1/4 TB, my guess is that this one also has a good amount of TB in her. But as has been said, there are different types of QHs, though that is largely influenced by the amount of TB blood.



  12. #12
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    Quarter Horses are all over the map in type -- from looking, moving and jumping like warmbloods or fancier-than-GRP ponies to the downhill bulldog.


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  13. #13
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    Here is a picture of a foundation bred mare, a daughter of Poco Dell, that was also not the little, chunky and rough traveling, "bulldog type" original qhs some think the foundation horses were supposed to be, which so many were not:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	122 
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ID:	37845  


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwoodsRider View Post
    Thanks. Like I said, more curiosity than anything else. Interesting that large % TB can still be registered as a quarter horse - something else I did not know.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    No, you can add registered TB's to the mix and if you prove them, get any kind of performance records as per the rule book, you can get permanent papers on those horses and their offspring.
    Yep
    The most I have seen was 15/16 TB registered as an appendix QH. That is a whole lot of one breed to be registered as the other. Many of the foundation sires were TB so I believe that is the one breed allowed on the books as long as they race QH and TB on the same tracks (Rarely the same race.) I don't see the QH books being closed to TB blood.
    The Denver Broncos went to visit an orphanage. "It's so sad looking into their faces so devoid of hope." Sara aged 6



  15. #15
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    Default

    My first thought when I saw the pictures in the OP was Appendix QH.



  16. #16
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    Isn't it true that Quarter horse lineage can be traced back to include the Godolphin Arabian?

    If we go back in lineage far enough, we end up with wild horses roaming ice age europe being hunted by Neanderthals.

    Go back in time even further and all modern horses will likely share the same common ancestor.

    Go back in time even further, and humans and horses will both share a common ancestor.

    Go back in time to the beginning of life on this planet, and there is evidence that all life evolved from a common ancestor.

    If you want pursue lineage as a basis for breed, then one might classify all horses and people as breeds of bacteria.

    Thus I'd suggest that the classification of any breed is subjective to the rules of those individuals who are making the classification.

    If the selection of rules are made arbitrarily, then one could hypothetically create a set of rules that would allow a very wide range of different horse "types" to be classified as Quarter Horses.

    I think it's up to each individual to decide if any horse meets with their own expectations for what qualifies it as being of any particular breed. Especially if they intend on purchasing a horse of a type that meets with those expectations.


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  17. #17
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    Default

    There's a huge amount of TB influence in the breed. There is also a line of QH that has some Percheron influence. There is so much variation in the breed today--what people look for in a QH depends on what they plan to do with it.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryisBlaisin' View Post
    There's a huge amount of TB influence in the breed. There is also a line of QH that has some Percheron influence. There is so much variation in the breed today--what people look for in a QH depends on what they plan to do with it.
    I suspect that for some folks, the word Quarter Horse is more symbolic than it is representative.



  19. #19
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    Remember that 'all' quarter horses originated via thoroughbreds in colonial America. As did standarbreds and saddlebreds. Julie Campbell's 'The Horse in Virginia' has an excellent explanation of this.

    In the 60s, I showed a qh stud in pleasure and halter for a friend. That horse, while the 'in' style of well muscled 'bulldog' appearance, was in fact 7/8 TB- went back to War Admiral 3 different ways.

    My appendix qh gelding is 16 hands and flatter in musculature, tending toward the 'tb' look. My mare is 14 hands, 'round' but not overly bulldoggy, slightly downhill, bred for cutting and very catlike in her movement as a result. Both horses can be traced back through Diomed to the Darley and Godolphin Arabians and Byerly Turk.



  20. #20
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    Oct. 26, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Quarter horses are called the most versatile breed for a reason.
    Yes, the reason being that many of them aren't straight-quarter horses.

    A registered QH can be up to 15/16 TB because a TB/QH cross can win its way into the main stud book. My mare is 3/4 TB but is a full QH on paper. The only thing that is actually QH-ish about her is a big cheek (on her face, not her butt ) and a shortish head profile (if that makes sense). Otherwise, she's a TB right down to her attitude.
    "And now . . .off to violin-land, where all is sweetness and delicacy and harmony and there are no red-headed clients to vex us with their conundrums."



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