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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2006
    Posts
    255

    Default Dot to dot?

    Sorry but I couldn't get anything to come up on search for dot to dot.
    Have a saddle on trial that is almost perfect in every way but I am a bit worried that it may be too narrow. There isn't anyone remotely close as far a saddle fitters so I am on my own.
    It is 4 " dot to dot. Is that narrow or Med?
    Looks pretty good on the horse but I worry that it will be too tight in the shoulder area.
    I am thinking that I should send it back and look for one that is a 4.5 because that would be a more common or versatile width.....is that right?
    It is a CWD, integrated panel. Love it just worried the width may limit its use or resale value later.....
    Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    904

    Default

    "Dot to dot" may be a worthwhile way to measure saddles - if all manufacturers put the "dots" in the same place.

    It is meaningless.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2001
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    You might be better off posting the information found under the saddle flap that describes the saddle. I think it would be more precise that "dot-to-dot". There are CWD reps who post on here, and they can probably tell you exactly what the saddle is (narrow, wide, ect.).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2006
    Posts
    255

    Default

    I am going to call CWD. Interestingly it was CWD themselves who have saddles described in dot to do measurements....



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    2,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dodedo View Post
    I am going to call CWD. Interestingly it was CWD themselves who have saddles described in dot to do measurements....
    Because for their saddle that is a sandard of measurement like with any quality brand. But, they are not standard between saddles! A medium cwd might be 4", while a medium devecoux may be 4.5". Both are the most common size tree, but measure different between dots.

    Look under the flap. Read of those numbers/letters. This serial number will tell you the tree size, flap forwardness, length and other details.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    904

    Default

    On CWD's used saddle website they use "dot to dot" on every brand. Note the County, Stackhouse, Stubben, Collegiate, etc don't even HAVE "dots".

    So where are they measuring those ones?

    It simply isn't a reliable way to determine the tree size. At all.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dodedo View Post
    Have a saddle on trial that is almost perfect in every way but I am a bit worried that it may be too narrow.
    Looks pretty good on the horse but I worry that it will be too tight in the shoulder area.
    It is a CWD, integrated panel. Love it just worried the width may limit its use or resale value later.....
    Thoughts?
    I found this to be an issue with CWD (OK with a lot of saddles ) - if the saddle is a good fit for you & horse seems to love it, you might ask CWD about "scooping out" the panels to increase shoulder room ...
    (they can also widen the tree, within limits)

    The idea of "dot to dot" is the width at the tree points, obviously the saddle manufacturer has a good idea of tree point angles & location.

    CWD should be able to assess fit of the saddle based upon photos & video & conformation photos & wither/back tracings.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2004
    Location
    Sandgate, VT
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Tree width is determined before the saddle is assembled; either measured in cms between the tree point, or based on the angle of the pommel opening/arch (BETA says, for example, that a med. tree measures 84° - 94.9°, and a wide between 95° and 104.9°). Measuring dot-to-dot, as others have said, doesn't tell you much. However, many saddles stamp seat size and tree width on the near-side sweat flap; if it's not there, you can contact the saddle co. with the serial no., and they should be able to tell you what the saddle was when it was made. However, keep in mind that most trees can be adjusted wider or narrower by about 1 width, so unless you know for sure no adjustments have been made, the info may not be totally accurate.



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