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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    41,754

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    If you put 4 small casters on the back, or 4 small solid wheels two on each side on the tall end, just sticking out a bit, you can tip it over and roll it around from place to place, maybe pulling it along with your horse.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post

    I like this block too. Doesnt look too hard to make, and would be really light.

    Thanks everyone for the ideas



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2012
    Posts
    1,897

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    We had a boarder who had a mounting block built with steps up and down and a handrail on the side to help the unsteady get on their horses, but it's useless for that purpose because it's too short. Spacytracy's block is too short also. A useful mounting block needs to be at least 36" high so that a person can swing a leg over without having to put a foot in the stirrup. That's the truly safe way to mount.

    I don't know how you would get both tall enough and portable in the same design.

    ETA Nezzy's looks great. Freedom Rider sells one that is not DIY but it is 32" tall and polyurethans, so possibly portable.
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    41,754

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    Maybe those that impaired should consider riding this kind of horse, that is less apt to dump you?

    http://equicizer.com/

    You can mount that one from any stool safely, it won't move on you.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,112

    Default

    My old trainer was also a braider and she used a small step ladder to braid. She attached a piece of plexiglass to the back of the ladder so a horse couldn't stick a leg through the back of the ladder.

    I have a small wooden ladder in my horse trailer as a mounting block. I wonder if you could add plexiglass to the back and then add rails on the bottom that go from the back legs to the front legs to add a little stability. You would lose the ability to fold it up but it would still be lightweight and easy to move.

    Our barn has one of the plastic mounting blocks but it is a tall three step. One of the women is 5'2 and has a 17.3H Fresian sport horse. Yes, he really is 17.3. He is HUGE. It just stays in the corner of the ring so it doesn't need to be moved but is light enough to move id you wanted to.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2012
    Posts
    1,897

    Default This is why you need a tall mounting block

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaW06WHbHaU

    I was looking at the runaway trotter video and this video was linked to it. Nothing bad happens because the rider manages to quickly get her foot out of the stirrup, but this is what I meant by needing to be up high enough to throw a leg over without putting a foot in the left stirrup first. I can see why the OP's friend wants one too.
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    41,754

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    I just had surgery on one arm and was trying to get on a horse, carefully, from a mounting block and the silly old reining schoolmaster, standing there so nicely, decided to take a step over as I was half over.
    I had to pull myself up hard with my good arm and pulled the rotary cuff half off that arm.
    Two years later, I needed surgery for that, as it didn't want to heal on it's own.

    No joking matter to have trouble getting on, especially if you are not limber any more.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,359

    Default

    We have the same ladder as CVpeg. It's our second one. The first lasted many years. It was run over by a truck. LOL ... It is made by Rubbermaid. Lowe's Home sells it at significantly less cost. I doubt one can build a better mounting block for under $20 with new materials.

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_140459-315-F...tep&facetInfo=



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    39

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    Those ladders are just not tall enough though. And the ones Ive seen here in New Zealand are not made strong enough!

    But I like them - have to get one myself



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,510

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    I guess best solution is to just get yourself familiar with a circular saw and screwdriver. If you don't have power tools, SOMEone in your network has them.
    It will be pretty easy to build a sturdy square frame out of 2x4s. Then cut/attach squares out of plywood as the platform and sides. That way you can build something at the height you need.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,819

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    Get some cement blocks. They cost about a dollar. 12 on the first layer, then 9, then 6.
    Alternately, steps for a mobile home are often used around here.

    I have a three step plastic mounting block. It cost about $75, but is oh so worth it. Very safe.

    Ladders are NOT safe.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,497

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    As an "aged" rider with an old, healed broken leg and two crappy shoulders from years in the horse training business...I ONLY mount off a block...mine are 30" tall and placed about 3.5 feet from a solid wall or fence. The wall will teach a horse to stay straight and at that height I can just swing my leg over even my 17 hand TB. I also never put a foot in the stirrup until I'm in the saddle...a got dragged years ago when using a step stool, the young horse spun his hip away from me and I fell backwards, hanging my foot in the stirrup. Not pretty!!
    As a spin off option...I am a foxhunter and after breaking my leg six years ago I agonized over how to get on my big horses away from home and in some very rural places. The two step mounting block we used in the trailer (solid wood back) was not going to work because I had no strength in my left leg. I laid in bed for 7 weeks pondering and came up with a great solution I'll share. We have a 2+1 custom trailer with a right front ramp. After unloading the horses, I put my two step mounting block UNDER the ramp, about half way out so the 4 foot ramp angles upward. I step on the running board of the trailer, step on the ramp, walk to the end and swing over onto the saddle. Works perfectly. Then last fall, I found a piece of PVC pipe, just the right length and now use that in place of the step stool. The pipe fits right over the door latch, so it doesn't slip out of place and is much easier to place than the stool. This would also work with a rear ramp. Much safer than a little ladder or stool when there are things to distract your horse.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I like the idea of the trailer door, will have to remember that when we go away from home.
    As HungarianHippo said, I think my best option will be to build one for her.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    930

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by up-at-5 View Post
    If you can find some old milk crates to use, the are great! You can set them up as big as you like. We bound ours together with zip ties. I'd take a pic, but it's buried in the snow out in the riding ring. I even ran ours over with the tractor once, and it held together!
    Please, please, please do not suggest milk crates. When we have to order new ones because people 'borrow' them, we have to order 5,000 at a time, at $5.00 apiece. Adds up quickly, folks! Go to Home Depot or Lowe's and buy the ones they sell!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    286

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    Best mounting block I used was at an old barn, it was a set of the fiberglass steps with attached hand rail that are sold (and found at the local recycling dump) for mobile homes and such. Nice wide solid steps and a 3x3 flat top about 4' off the ground. Not portable but great for the corner of an arena. If you google mobile home porch steps you should come up,with photos.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Awesome thank you.

    I went to our local hardware store and seen a nice set of solid plastic steps, littl step ladder really. Just not sure if it would be high enough. Have to measure the one out in the arena first!



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,760

    Cool Better than having to 'homemake' Try this one ~ tall inexpensive but GREAT !

    I found this one ... HOME DEPOT !

    Werner 150B aluminum step stool ~ IT"S GREAT

    It is $40.00 and light to cary from place to place `

    24" tall with a great step pad that is traction safe whether one is mounting from

    barefeet

    tennis shoes

    or riding boots

    I have used it since my total hip replacement ... it puts my little foot very near the stirrup ~

    google it sorry tech challenged can supply link ~

    I highly recommend it !
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Wish we had a home Depot here!



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,760

    Default ** Just order one through you're local hardware store ~ It's a great stool !

    Quote Originally Posted by T-RaceR View Post
    Wish we had a home Depot here!

    ** Just order one through your local hardware store ~ or better yet online order

    It's really a great stool / mounting block !

    I take with me when trying out new horses ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,642

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    My friend has the same problem. She is 67 with a bad back and has a 17h mare. I am much shorter and my horse is 15.2, but after breaking my hip there is no mounting from the ground. Initially( a couple of years ago), we purchased a 3 step as the only 4 step we could find was listed in England. The steps were fairly pricey then add on international shipping, yikes. Any way, we are moving to a new farm and the owner does not have a decent mounting block at the farm(only a two step). My friend searched online and found a place in Fla that had a 4 step listed, so she purchased it. She figured by the time she found someone to make one, then materials it was worth the cost.



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