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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,898

    Default From at friends at Not Always Right.com - HEAD * DESK


    Sheep Dogs Aren’t Sheepish

    Dog Training | Prince William County, VA, USA | Pets & Animals

    (A client comes into my program with a very energetic Border Collie puppy.)


    Client:
    “My puppy is out of control. We live on a farm and needed a dog for our livestock. This is not what I wanted.”

    Me:
    “Okay, what is your puppy doing?”

    Client:
    “Chasing my goats and chickens all over the place!”

    Me:
    “Well this is a Border Collie, and they do herd. If the drive is not properly honed in to a herd, then a Border Collie will just chase.”

    Client:
    “But, I do not want my dog to chase my animals at all.”

    Me:
    “Then do not put your dog in with the animals.”

    Client:
    “But, I need her to protect my animals.”

    Me:
    “This is not what this breed was developed to do. This is an active, working breed that will chase.”

    Client:
    “But, I need her to lie quietly and just watch the animals.”

    Me:
    “It’s not in her breeding. What research did you do into Border Collies before you got one? Every piece of literature on dogs out there will tell you these are active dogs that will chase.”

    Client:
    “Well, I asked some guy at the local feed store what a good dog for working livestock was. He suggested a few breeds. I saw Babe, so I got a Border Collie.”

    Me:
    “Did you tell the feed store guy the type of job you wanted a dog to do?”

    Client:
    “Work livestock.”

    Me:
    “Work it how? Herding or guarding?”

    (The client just gives me a blank stare.)


    Me:
    “You have no idea the difference between herding and guarding?”

    Client:
    “I thought they were the same.”

    Me:
    “No. Have you had any farm experience?”

    Client:
    “No, we’re from the city. We thought it would be fun to move to this county and buy a small farm. But, now we have coyotes killing our animals.”

    Me:
    “So, you have no idea what you are doing at all?”

    Client:
    “No. It’s not as easy as it looks on TV huh?”

    Me:
    “No…”

    (Luckily, they did learn more about Border Collies. They got into a suitable sport after doing basic work with me, and I guided them to people who could help them get a proper livestock guarding dog.)
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2004
    Location
    north of Atlanta GA
    Posts
    3,751

    Default

    Citiots!
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2006
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,794

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bird4416 View Post
    Citiots!
    At least this one was willing to listen and learn.

    Christa


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 17, 2007
    Location
    Meadowview VA
    Posts
    2,249

    Default

    One of our BCs jumped in a pond once to herd the ducks....



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,607

    Default

    Ya just can't fix "stupid"!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2012
    Location
    Wairarapa New Zealand
    Posts
    403

    Default

    That is funny! My young BC herds our feral chickens to the chicken shed to get fed. She is very good at bringing each and every one separately too . No, she isnt chasing them. She walks them quietly there and goes back for the next one. They have learnt and wait for her
    Still Working_on_it - one day I will get it!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post

    Sheep Dogs Aren’t Sheepish

    Dog Training | Prince William County, VA, USA | Pets & Animals

    (A client comes into my program with a very energetic Border Collie puppy.)


    Client:
    “My puppy is out of control. We live on a farm and needed a dog for our livestock. This is not what I wanted.”

    Me:
    “Okay, what is your puppy doing?”

    Client:
    “Chasing my goats and chickens all over the place!”

    Me:
    “Well this is a Border Collie, and they do herd. If the drive is not properly honed in to a herd, then a Border Collie will just chase.”

    Client:
    “But, I do not want my dog to chase my animals at all.”

    Me:
    “Then do not put your dog in with the animals.”

    Client:
    “But, I need her to protect my animals.”

    Me:
    “This is not what this breed was developed to do. This is an active, working breed that will chase.”

    Client:
    “But, I need her to lie quietly and just watch the animals.”

    Me:
    “It’s not in her breeding. What research did you do into Border Collies before you got one? Every piece of literature on dogs out there will tell you these are active dogs that will chase.”

    Client:
    “Well, I asked some guy at the local feed store what a good dog for working livestock was. He suggested a few breeds. I saw Babe, so I got a Border Collie.”

    Me:
    “Did you tell the feed store guy the type of job you wanted a dog to do?”

    Client:
    “Work livestock.”

    Me:
    “Work it how? Herding or guarding?”

    (The client just gives me a blank stare.)


    Me:
    “You have no idea the difference between herding and guarding?”

    Client:
    “I thought they were the same.”

    Me:
    “No. Have you had any farm experience?”

    Client:
    “No, we’re from the city. We thought it would be fun to move to this county and buy a small farm. But, now we have coyotes killing our animals.”

    Me:
    “So, you have no idea what you are doing at all?”

    Client:
    “No. It’s not as easy as it looks on TV huh?”

    Me:
    “No…”

    (Luckily, they did learn more about Border Collies. They got into a suitable sport after doing basic work with me, and I guided them to people who could help them get a proper livestock guarding dog.)
    These are also the same type of people that buy an Arabian because "they're so pretty," then get upset when their horse outsmarts them and wants to go faster than a trot.
    PA Hi-Ly Visible [PA Hi-Noon (by Magnum Psyche) x Takara Padrona (by *Padron)], 2005 Arabian gelding

    Proud member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    1,921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RaeHughes View Post
    That is funny! My young BC herds our feral chickens to the chicken shed to get fed. She is very good at bringing each and every one separately too . No, she isnt chasing them. She walks them quietly there and goes back for the next one. They have learnt and wait for her

    Cute! My ACD keeps my unruly chickens in their pen while I feed and water... He's pretty cute actually - when I open their pop door he stands next to the ramp and greets each one as they come out and makes sure everybody is where they are supposed to be, then he goes to the gate and makes sure no one escapes Herding breeds can be such a handful and I definitely have to keep on him when it comes to the horses... But I just have the best time watching him "work". He is my first ACD - I always had labs before - and I still find it amazing how naturally ingrained his "job" is.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,607

    Default

    Years ago we adopted a "walk-in" sheltie to our training center. She never bothered the horses, but would round up all the toads she could find, herd them into a pack, move them 100 feet down through the barn and group them in the wash stall!! Toads were well "legged up", but not amused!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    7 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,566

    Default

    I taught my Sheltie to do goose removal when I was at a training center. Since I am not there anymore the command goose has become generic for anything he is allowed to chase. I do occasionally pull over on the side of the road when there are geese in a field so he gets to chase the real thing


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    948

    Default

    These stories of y'alls dogs are the BEST!
    PA Hi-Ly Visible [PA Hi-Noon (by Magnum Psyche) x Takara Padrona (by *Padron)], 2005 Arabian gelding

    Proud member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,952

    Default

    A city person used the phrase "work livestock"? I guess they picked it up and thought it sounded very knowledgeable. Oops. I can't imagine how frustrated the owners were - the dog probably didn't really care - with having images of "dog lying majestically around looking protective" running through their head, and getting "dog as perpetual motion machine" instead. Even when you know what you're getting into, a collie ain't no joke as a young dog. I don't have photos of mine until she was about 4; before that, she never sat still long enough. Collies... Probably worked out better than the reverse would have - can you imagine trying to beg/bully/force a flock-guardian breed to herd? Disaster.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2010
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Sorry I am a city girl born and raised and I know the difference between dogs that herd and dogs that guard.

    But then, I grew up with a World Book Encyclopedia in the house, and the D volume had excellent illustrations of dog breeds by group. (Although I think back then Herding and Working were all together ...)

    Whatever. I am glad these cityfolk came to you and that they were herdable. What livestock guarding dog did they get? Do they still have the BC?
    RoanPonyMare


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
    Posts
    3,404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    Years ago we adopted a "walk-in" sheltie to our training center. She never bothered the horses, but would round up all the toads she could find, herd them into a pack, move them 100 feet down through the barn and group them in the wash stall!! Toads were well "legged up", but not amused!!
    That is highly entertaining! lol How many toads would she round up? And at least she was herding them to water.

    P.
    A Wandering Albertan - NEW Africa travel blog!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    Years ago we adopted a "walk-in" sheltie to our training center. She never bothered the horses, but would round up all the toads she could find, herd them into a pack, move them 100 feet down through the barn and group them in the wash stall!! Toads were well "legged up", but not amused!!
    That's hilarious!!!!!! Poor toads!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    Herding dogs : Give them a job or they will find one on their own LOL.

    I have 2 shelties - they herd each other all over the house. And when I'm visiting a friend with them, they *try* to herd her cats. The cats are not as cooperative as toads.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,566

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roxyllsk View Post
    Herding dogs : Give them a job or they will find one on their own LOL.

    I have 2 shelties - they herd each other all over the house. And when I'm visiting a friend with them, they *try* to herd her cats. The cats are not as cooperative as toads.
    I let my sheltie herd an exercise ball. He loves that.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    3,437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    Years ago we adopted a "walk-in" sheltie to our training center. She never bothered the horses, but would round up all the toads she could find, herd them into a pack, move them 100 feet down through the barn and group them in the wash stall!! Toads were well "legged up", but not amused!!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

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