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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    517

    Default Becoming a TD?

    I've had a lot of downtime recently in my riding career, and I've been thinking about how much I always enjoy volunteering at events and being around eventers - sometimes much more so than riding at events! I've just made plans to spend my 30th birthday weekend volunteering at an event and sleeping in my truck, that's how much I enjoy it.

    I've been thinking more and more about training to be a TD. I have no great ambitions, just a curiosity and a love of the organizing/nitpicky parts of events. Has anyone ever been a TD or gone through the training? What was the experience like? Was it worth it? What are the benefits/drawbacks (beyond the obvious contributing/having people complain to you a lot)?The USEA website doesn't give much information on the process, so I'm hoping there are some people out there who can chime in.
    life + horses
    beljoeor.blogspot.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
    Posts
    5,653

    Default

    Officials are licensed by the USEF, so the information is on their site. This is the manual http://usef.org/documents/licensedOf...nformation.pdf

    Basically, you are meant to have ridden or trained at least two horses at the preliminary level or above and have spent some time in some capacity as part of organizing a horse trials in order to apply for the program. Then you do some independent study stuff (essentially volunteering with sign off by already licensed officials). Once you have done that, you submit an application and take a weekend course. You then do your apprenticeships, which include 2 SJ and 4 with a TD (for the TD license). Then you apply to take the final exam and get letters of recommendation from 15 licensed officials. People have done it in less than a year. Because I was also actively competing and have a 60 hour a week day job, I took just under two years from taking the weekend course to being a licensed 'r' TD. On these boards, Janet, canterlope, msghook, and several others are TDs.

    Of my own volition, in addition to the required work, I took the course designers course twice with two different designers and did my own "apprenticeships" with course controllers including FlightCheck and msghook as I thought understanding their roles would be very important to being a TD.
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    4,127

    Default

    You can also look into becoming a level 1 steward and working you way up...maybe a little less expensive ....it all does take time and some $$$ to do thought...Bestbof luck



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,596

    Default

    You are needed!

    The average age of our officials is getting older and older without much young blood coming in. If this is something you are interested I would strongly encourage you to pursue it and discuss the possibilities before you determine you aren't qualified.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,865

    Default

    Janet just became a TD. You might want to talk to her.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2002
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,057

    Default

    This might (should?) be a separate thread but I've been trying to start a method to convert USDF L Graduates (not allowed to call them judges) over to an equivalent for USEA. I don't see why anyone who's already gone through all the hoops should have to do a one weekend, very expensive, dressage course. We should be able to offer some sort of stadium & XC course locally to provide the officials needed to encourage more low level events.
    Brock
    Brock n. (Anglo-Saxon) badger as in Brockenhurst, Brocklebank etc www.area35.us



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    517

    Default

    I may be out, then - I've never taken a horse prelim and don't have any prospects of doing so in the future. Shoot. I will look into being a steward, though, maybe?

    scubed, thank you for the link to the manual. I didn't see the document links off to the side on the USEA website. I'll start reading and send an email to the USEA and see if there are any other ways I can pursue this.
    life + horses
    beljoeor.blogspot.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,905

    Default

    Kerlin, you have the option for a waiver:
    [SIZE=1]To have ridden two horses that have completed four or more horse trials at the Preliminary Level or higher. Waivers may be granted to this requirement for those who have trained two or more horses or coached two or more riders that have completed four or more horse trials at the Preliminary Level or higher.
    Have been an active member of an organizing committee, if possible as the director or secretary, and worked as a scorer, timer or fence judge.

    The waiver is there for those who have trained others to the Prelim level. It indicates you have a working knowledge of what is required to compete at that level.
    If you are interested in becoming a TD, do work/volunteer at as many HT's as possible. Reach out to the TD at a "local" competition to see if you can shadown him/her. I have done this with several folks interested in becoming a TD. Not to mention I shadowed a few before I entered the program.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



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