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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    So now I want to know, what is hydrophane made of?

    I use neatsfoot oil, but never really thought about its source. Now that I'm grossed out, I'm wondering if hydrophane, which I also use, is really any better.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    baby unicorn chins


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2005
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    2,596

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    I think the idea is that an animal derived oil is a better fit for an animal derived product than vegetable or mineral derived oils.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Cullowhere?, NC
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    I'm betting that Hydrophane is just a more refined animal-based oil. Probably has some other stuff in it, too, but I bet part is good old neatsfoot. It is a bit lighter oil, though, so there's more to it. Probably the unicorn chins. Or processed olives.

    Oh, yeah, the mold thing. I was raised in sunny CA, in the dark ages when new leather was dryer, and rode mostly western anyway (thicker, less refined leather). Or old Stubben saddles. Went through neatsfoot like crazy. It's taken me several years, living in the humid south, to adapt my leather care to get throught the cold winters but not disappear in a grey cloud in July and August. Still isn't ever foolproof.
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  5. #25
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Ah, so that's why I've never seen an adult unicorn. They get processed long before they grow up!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2001
    Location
    Lexington, KY--GO BIG BLUE!!
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    3,185

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    Lexol conditioner and glycerine is a staple for me for dry tack (useable for every day after cleaning, too).

    I don't like greasy, sticky beeswax products like lederbalsam. The leather may feel nice and supple, but it attracts dirt like a magnet and creates a gunky buildup over time. It's not so bad to use on your saddle before going xc, it provides good grip and waterproofing; but I've learned for every day use, a "lighter" oil product that completely absorbs (or evaporates) is a better alternative.
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
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    2,396

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    The thing I find most interesting about tack cleaning and oiling is that everyone swears by different products and almost everyones tack turns out just fine. I've handled bridles that are cleaned religiously with saddle soap after every ride and I've handled bridles that are wiped down and lightly conditioned with a conditioning balm only as needed. I couldn't tell the difference.

    I do think that some saddles start out "thirsty" and I do not think you are going to ruin the stitching if you go to town with hydroplane, neatsfoot oil, olive oil, etc. My saddle is at least 15 years old and it gets drowned in oil a few times a year. The leather is supple, stitching is tight, and I see no reason why it won't be usable for another 15 years.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    The thing I find most interesting about tack cleaning and oiling is that everyone swears by different products and almost everyones tack turns out just fine.
    You mean there is no consensus on the right way to do things??? OMG.
    Click here before you buy.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    14,888

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    The moral of the story is that the OP needs to post pictures, or some Professional Leather Feeder needs to come over for an intervention.

    IMO, a saddle that has been oiled decently at least once shouldn't squeak. I have met (and fed) some Pessoa saddles that were permanently thirsty. But that's unusual.

    IMO, you can feel an oil's thirst-quenching properties. The heavier, thicker it feels, the more it satisfies the inside of the leather.

    I like pure neatsfoot, but I see how olive oil could be good, too. Hydropane seemed too thin to me. You got the oily shininess on the outside but when you bent the leather later, you didn't get the same suppleness.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Scary thought! Squeaky saddles can have a damaged tree.

    Not want you want to hear with a new saddle!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  11. #31
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    It's not the tree. It's mild squeaking where the stirrup leathers rub against the flaps. Goes away with oil. Has come back after generous oiling #1. The saddle hasn't been ridden in 25 times yet. I do think it's simply thirsty.
    Click here before you buy.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    FYI, folks, brain tissue has fat in it.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Brains are MOSTLY fat.
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #34
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    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
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    Lexol, Zombies' favorite drinks!

    Be prepared for the end of the world, buy some Lexol!!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Brains are MOSTLY fat.
    Not gonna touch that one! Claiming exemption.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Brains are MOSTLY fat.
    So are baby unicorn chins ! PLUS they're majikal !!



  17. #37
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Unicorn chins have a totally inappropriate ration of Omega 4 to Omega 19, for pity's sake! Why do you think the things are almost extinct? All that inflammation--they simply go up in smoke!
    Click here before you buy.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,414

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    Try Flexalan.

    It is made from lanolin.

    It is not made with brains because sheep don't have them.

    Good stuff.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    39,954

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Brains are MOSTLY fat.
    Fat head is true.

    I have always used pure neatsfoot oil on new or dried up old leather, some times Lexol and all and any worked fine.
    Some of my tack is a good 40 years old and still in excellent shape.

    I have heard neatfoot oil can rot the old waxed cotton thread used in stitching before the new kind they have today.
    Don't know if it is true.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
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    2,400

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Brains are MOSTLY fat.
    No wonder I'm such a genius!

    *runs off to gorge on Snickers in the hopes that it will transform me into a Mensa candidate*


    1 members found this post helpful.

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