The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2001
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,704

    Default Stability for the muddy threshold between paddock and stall

    Reading about arena footing and hogfuel and mud got me to thinking. You all might have some good ideas for a little issue I have in my gelding's paddock. The area right outside his stall door to his paddock is where the rain/snow drips off the roof. Thus, in spring and fall, it's always muddy and deep. I'd like to do something to alleviate that. Installing rain gutters would be great, but I haven't figured out how to effectively do that yet, so I'd at least like to address the footing part of the issue. I did, a couple years ago, add bark chips. They didn't really help all that much. The footing is sand and about 3 feet deep. Should I be adding gravel? Some kind of mesh covered with gravel/sand? I'm open to ideas.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,672

    Default

    How about putting a mat over it that is sloped to redirect the water elsewhere?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,915

    Default

    I would do gravel topped with a mat - that is what I use, and it works well.

    I find wood products keep the soil moist when it would otherwise dry out, and can actually make mud worse in the long run.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    I would do gravel topped with a mat - that is what I use, and it works well.

    I find wood products keep the soil moist when it would otherwise dry out, and can actually make mud worse in the long run.
    BINGO! My choice of solution as well.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Exactly. While it's kind of still mucky, I'd dig out the mud and add gravel liberally. Throw a drain-through mat or two on top and top with screenings or sand. you should be good. That's what I've got in exactly the same type of area (opening of my run-in). I started with solid mats but switched to drain-through because of ice. Also, I put the drain-through mats in upside-down, someone told me to do it that way, there's more traction on the bottom.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
    Posts
    1,086

    Default

    I'd even add large gravel mixed with pea gravel/crushed granite to make it even sturdier.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,307

    Default

    I have a concrete threshhold, but my footing was clay. (Deep, sticky, clay). I also have the same issue with dripping from the edge of the roof, and also have occasional snow piles slide off in this spot. The concrete was easy to pour and has held up well. Horses don't have any issues with it (slipping, etc.) although in one area at the back of the barn it slopes a little and they tend to avoid walking there if they can.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,189

    Default

    I have one particularly wretched area and I put down carpet with stone finings over the top. The carpet stops the mud getting poached.

    edited to say - a large piece of carpet 12 x 12.
    Last edited by Molly Malone; Mar. 21, 2013 at 08:26 AM. Reason: added info



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
    Location
    south eastern US
    Posts
    2,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    I would do gravel topped with a mat - that is what I use, and it works well.

    I find wood products keep the soil moist when it would otherwise dry out, and can actually make mud worse in the long run.
    I've done exactly this at the back side of my barn....gravel, sand then a mat on top = no more mud. My husband had tried to use used shavings from the barn to fill muddy areas but I think I've finally got him educated on the fact that it just doesn't work. The wood shavings/chips hold water when you really want the water to go away.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2001
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,704

    Default

    See, I knew you people would have a great idea. Thank you!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,920

    Default

    Gravel. Lots. But, really, I know you said gutters aren't an option, but that would be the best help. Getting the water off the building and away from it is key. If you board, however, I can see where that wouldn't be possible. I can't imagine building anything here without a drainage plan, which includes gutters, but I know folks do it all the time.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    108

    Default

    If you have clay, lay some landscape fabric down, beneath the gravel, otherwise the clay and gravel will become mixed, and you have the same problem.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,180

    Default

    I apologize for continually harping my own website, but I recently did an addition on mud with some links to good information sources. The one from Kentucky is really good if you want a step by step explanation with really good photos!

    http://thepitchforkchronicles.com/page2.php

    You'll have to scroll down to get to the section on mud.

    I did landscape fabric here with 3/4" stone on top and then mats over that when I re did under the overhangs. I didn't go quite deep enough on the area around the overhangs so some of the fabric is coming up from under the dirt. I plan to add some more stone or recycled asphalt to fix that problem. Digging out the deep muck is important, especially if it is mixed with organic materials.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,252

    Default

    A 6 to 12' roof overhang should eliminate the problem.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKB View Post
    A 6 to 12' roof overhang should eliminate the problem.

    Without gutters, you'll just move the problem out 6 to 12 feet.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,377

    Default Gravel and Mats ~

    Gravel and mats ~ an a complete 're-do' when it dries out ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



Similar Threads

  1. Footing to use outside in/out stall into paddock?
    By Loves to ride in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jul. 30, 2012, 07:27 PM
  2. How to improve a muddy run-in/paddock
    By hoser1 in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Feb. 15, 2011, 04:52 PM
  3. New footing for muddy paddock??
    By Bank of Dad in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 14, 2010, 04:51 PM
  4. Muddy Stall Runs/Paddocks
    By wylde sage in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Oct. 29, 2009, 02:28 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Aug. 12, 2009, 08:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •