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  1. #21

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    Thanks Robin. Hubby was just asking that question. We plan to cover the entire floor with mats, put down the screenings, level and tamp, then cover. That is our plan anyway. We thought this a better retrofit than trying to get in concrete, and those rubberized brick pavers are definitely not in the budget (though I drool when I see them!).



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9,930

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    KR- in order to evaluate the limestone screening dust factor in my barn and just off the stalls leading to the sacrifice area where the lots are covered with 6" of screening- I would have to remove the intersecting gravel roads 1/4 mile away, the gravel road in front of the house, the sacrifice dry lot off of the pens, the 150 acre row crop field across the street from the house and the hay fields behind and beside our property. Dust happens in the country be it man made or natural.

    Mostly I wet the mats and aisle screenings down in the summer time because it helps cool the barn with evaporation. I haven't checked it scientifically but it feels 10 degrees cooler after being hosed down and having the fans blowing. Plus, during the drought last year I would hose down the stall mats on the day of a farrier appointment so that the horses hooves had some moisture in them. It made a nice difference for his work and my horses hooves.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2000
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,304

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    This is ours. http://www.flickr.com/photos/59702840@N06/

    We have been in it now for a little more than a year and love it. Built at same time we were building our house. Straight forward center aisle design pole barn. Six stalls, tack room, wash rack, feed room and a hay storage area.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,434

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    Quote Originally Posted by pds View Post
    This is ours. http://www.flickr.com/photos/59702840@N06/

    We have been in it now for a little more than a year and love it. Built at same time we were building our house. Straight forward center aisle design pole barn. Six stalls, tack room, wash rack, feed room and a hay storage area.
    So many neat barns, this one is sure pretty also.
    Thank you for the pictures.



  5. #25

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    KR- in order to evaluate the limestone screening dust factor in my barn and just off the stalls leading to the sacrifice area where the lots are covered with 6" of screening- I would have to remove the intersecting gravel roads 1/4 mile away, the gravel road in front of the house, the sacrifice dry lot off of the pens, the 150 acre row crop field across the street from the house and the hay fields behind and beside our property. Dust happens in the country be it man made or natural.
    SLW -- totally agree. But to the extent I can reduce it, that's my goal. My doctor warns that the barn is the worst place for me, in terms of respiratory health. But my heart can't stand the strain of staying away. So -- I keep trying one "fix" after another.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9,930

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    You will love the screenings KR and you already know that dust just "is" in rural Kansas. I did not understand that the screening issue was respiratory with you, no bueno.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2011
    Posts
    418

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    what kind of flooring is that in the aisleway?

    Quote Originally Posted by SPF10 View Post
    http://s1269.photobucket.com/user/jonshrry/library/Barn

    Our barn isn't very fancy but suits us, just two horses, I really like how it turned out, you can change the look by using different sliders, like ones with windows in them, but that was out of budget for us. As on the other thread only thing I regret is not insulating roof as it is loud in the rain, I will probably fix that at some point. No warmer in summer than anything else usually 5-10 degrees cooler.
    "But I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep." Robert Frost

    Eventing at Midnight Blog
    http://eventingmidnight.blogspot.com/



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,226

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    Quote Originally Posted by ayrabz View Post
    BDJ...that's just an ADORABLE well thought out, very neat and attractive barn! Love what you did in : incorporating the run in on one end. Beautiful looking spot as well. So! Eastern Shore MD (!) take any overnight campers looking to ride the beach?
    Aww, thanks ayrabz! I have to admit that I "stole" the attached run-in idea from a friend who I housesit for - I loved it at her place, so it was something I really wanted to incorporate into my own!
    Would love to have folks over, but we're about an hour to the nearest beach - wouldn't you know it, I live in the only landlocked county on the Shore!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2009
    Location
    Where the blacktop ends-Maryland
    Posts
    410

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cameraine View Post
    what kind of flooring is that in the aisleway?
    Concrete pavers, the mat is recessed but there are pavers under it as well. They have a gritty feel so not slippery at all.
    "They spend 11 months stuggling to live, and 25 years trying to die" my farrier

    "They are dangerous on both ends and crafty in the middle"



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,434

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    Quote Originally Posted by SPF10 View Post
    Concrete pavers, the mat is recessed but there are pavers under it as well. They have a gritty feel so not slippery at all.
    They look very neat.
    Are they just laid on a bed of sand, or concreted in?



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2007
    Posts
    2,155

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    PDS, I love your barn (and porch, and all your photos!) Is your barn a "low profile" one meaning no hay loft? Where do you store your hay?



  12. #32
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2000
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,304

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    Quote Originally Posted by tpup View Post
    PDS, I love your barn (and porch, and all your photos!) Is your barn a "low profile" one meaning no hay loft? Where do you store your hay?
    Thanks!
    The sidewalls are ten feet. The center is open to the top peak (about twenty feet) so no loft. The photo showing a twelve foot by twelve foot open front space is where we keep hay and shavings bags. http://www.flickr.com/photos/5970284...in/photostream We generally buy hay every few weeks. Less in summer when pastures are nice a full.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2009
    Location
    Where the blacktop ends-Maryland
    Posts
    410

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    They look very neat.
    Are they just laid on a bed of sand, or concreted in?
    A layer of stone mechanically tamped, a layer if sand, the pavers, then something called polymeric sand is brushed into cracks, you wet it down and it hardens like a mortar.
    Last edited by SPF10; Mar. 25, 2013 at 07:37 PM.
    "They spend 11 months stuggling to live, and 25 years trying to die" my farrier

    "They are dangerous on both ends and crafty in the middle"



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,434

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    Quote Originally Posted by SPF10 View Post
    A layer of stone mechanically tamped, a layer if sand, the pavers, then something called polymeric sand is brushed into cracks, you wet it down and it hardens like a mortar.
    Thank you, that was very helpful, sure looks great.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

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    Here is ours - not too fancy but very practical and easy to look after. We keep talking about adding a portico or a front porch - something I would like to do

    http://www.prospectequinefarms.com/facility.htm

    Easy to look after is key.



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